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Full text of "Sub turri = Under the tower : the yearbook of Boston College"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2011 with funding from 
Boston College Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/subturriundertow1987bost 



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Go placidly, 

amid the noise and the haste, 

and remennber 

the peooe there oan be 

in Silenoe, 



2 / Opening 




Opening / 3 



Enjoy your oohievemonts 
OS well OS your plans, 

Keep interested in your oo reer 
however hunnble; 
it is a real possession 
in the changing fortunes 
of Tinne, 



4 / Opening 




Opening / 5 



Never be cynical about love, 
for in the face of all aridity 

and disenchantment 

it is OS perennial as the gross, 



6 / Opening 



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Opening / 7 



Take kindly 

the counsel of the years 
gracefully surrendering 
the things of youth. 



8 / Opening 




Opening / 9 



You are a child of the universe, 

no less 

than the trees and the stars. 



10 / Opening 




Steve Fitzpatrick 



Opening / 11 



You have a right to be here and, 

whether it is clear to you, 

no doubt 

the universe is unfolding 

OS it should, 



12 / Opening 




Opening / 13 



Therefore, 

be at peace with God, 

whatever you oonoeive him to be, 

Whatever your labors 
and aspirations 
in the noisy oonfusion of life, 
keep peace with your soul, 



14 / Opening 




opening / 15 



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BOSTON COLLEGE 



Boston College 



Boston College in Chestnut Hill, 
Massachusetts was founded by 
the Jesuits in 1863. It has since 
become the fourth largest 
private university in New England with a 
total enrollment of more than 14,000. BC is 
today comprised of eleven schools, 
colleges, and institutes and offers thirteen 
degrees. 

Students from various parts of the United 
States and other countries comprise the 
student body. All come to BC to broaden 
their horizons academically, socially, and 
spiritually in the Jesuit tradition. There is 
something special about Boston College, 
something behind the "Insh-Catholic" 
classification which attracts students from 
diverse backgrounds and blends them 
into one community. It is the tradition of 
"Ever to Excel" which unites these students 
and makes them proud to be a part of BC. 




38 / B.C. 




B.C. / 39 




Campus life at BC was sometimes 
hectic, but students usually found 
some way of having fun. Times in 
the dorm usually were spent try- 
ing to get out of studying. After a hard day 
at the books, one usually looked forward to 
eating, sleeping, and talking to your 
friends about nothing at all. The dorm was 
the ultimate as an endless source of diver- 
sion. 

Of course if all your friends were at 
O'Neill, you could just go down to one of 
the dining halls. Each class had their own 
special place for eating, talking, and 
scoping. Whether you were in Stuart, 
Eagles' Nest or the Rat there was almost al- 
ways someone to talk to or just look at for a 
while. 

If the weather was warm you could 
usually find dozens of students on the Dust- 
bowl. Talk about a scoping site! You could 
sit for hours on the Dustbowl and watch 
fellow students trudge to the class you 
were supposed to be in. That is, unless you 
saw your professor walking through the 
Dustbowl too. 

You could surrender to O'Neill, intent on 
studying until you saw someone you knew 
in the lobby. If one remained on the third 
floor, one could accomplish the feat of 
going to the library without cracking a 
book. Basically, anyone could find a 
place on campus to forget why you were 
going to college. 




40 / B.C. 





B.C. / 41 




42 / B.C. 



Aside from attending classes dur- 
ing the week and going to 
parties on weekends, students 
at BC can broaden thieir in- 
terests considerably by becoming in- 
volved in extracurricular activities. At BC it 
is difficult to find an excuse for nonin- 
volvement since there is something for 
everyone. A brief tour through the bottom 
floor of McElroy provides the student with 
an excellent overview of what is offered: 
UGBC, MASSPIRG, Gold Key Society, The 
Heights and WZBC to name just a few. 

Although many of these activities 
demand a considerable amount of time 
from the students involved, the benefits are 
numerous. Many activities are excellent 
training grounds for future careers, whether 
they be in government, the media or 
public service. Even if students do not ex- 
pect to pursue careers in these fields, their 
involvement at BC will undoubtedly lead 
to a more complete "college experience." 




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Boston College has an excellent 
reputation as far as academics is 
concerned. But BC also is known 
for its consistently successful 
sports teams. BC Football is an integral part 
of campus life during the fall. Basketball 
and hockey also help the students make it 
through those exhausting winter months. Of 
course, these are not the only three sports 
BC has to offer. Other intercollegiate sports 
include men's and women's tennis, men's 
and women's rugby, volleyball, wrestling, 
golf and track. 

Even though BC is known primarily for its 
outstanding interscholastic sports 
competition, its athletic tradition has 
something to offer even the non-varsity 
jock. The William Flynn Recreation 
Complex provides a place for individuals 
to pursue their own athletic interests. You 
can get together with a friend to play 
racquetball or tennis, or find a few more to 
have a pick-up game of hoops. There is 
also the intramural aspect of BC sports, 
where one could enjoy competitive but 
less serious athletic activity. There is also 
the always popular although "illegal" hall 
sports, as well as mud and snow football, 
volleyball in the Mods, or softball. BC 
students surely know how to have fun as 
well as study. 





B.C. / 45 




46 / B.C. 




Although students at Be _,: 
College have diverse interests 
and goals, there is one part of 
life at BC that all have in 
common: classes. A joy to some, a mere 
chore to others, the courses offered at BC 
are as diverse as the students themselves. 
From the standard Intro Calculus and Biol- 
ogy to the more unusual Physics for the 
Curious and Deviance and Social Control, 
there is, indeed, something for everyone. 
Attending these classes is another 
subject entirely, Most students arrive on 
campus each semester with very good in- 
tentions and lofty aspirations. "This semes- 
ter I'm shooting for a 4.0," is commonly 
uttered by the more ambitious during the 
first week of classes. As time wears on and 
reality sets in, however, the standards 
become lower until, during finals week, 
students realize that sitting on the Dustbowl 
and sleeping in O'Neill do not an A-student 
make. "I hope I pass," is more commonly 
heard at this time. 

Even though some students at BC occa- 
sionally lose sight of their goals, most real- 
ize that they come to BC to learn, and treat 
their classes accordingly. Despite occa- 
sional thoughts of "why on earth did I sign 
up for this course," most students will 
graduate from BC with a great deal more 
knowledge than what they arnve with 
freshman year. 



B.C./47 





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CURRENT EVENTS 



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1986-1987 



Page 1 



Lady Liberty Celebrates 100th! 

July 4th Spectacle 

Ignites New 

York Harbor 

New York The nuiions symbol 
of hope and promise was weakening 
at the seams. Bolts were missing and 
copper iinics strained from construc- 
tional errors that were made one 
hundred years previously when the 
statue was brought across the Atlan- 
tic from France. After two years of 
tedious reconstruction and conser- 
vation techniques, the nation's Lady 
Liberty was given a S75 million 
make over. 

Visitors to New York may have 
been dismayed during the past two 
years while the statue was engulfed 
by scaffolding. Liberty was encaged. 
The results, however proved worth- 
while. All of the funding used in the 
renovation was raised from individ- 
ual donations as well as endowments 
from large corporations. Chrysler's 
Lee lacoca headed the committee in 
charge of the fund raising. 

On the 4th of July, thirty-three 
naval vessels and twenty-t\yo tall 
ships sailed into New York Harbor 
escorted by a 40.000 boat flotilla. 
Later in the evening the statue was 
surrounded by a 28 minute show of 
pyrotechnics. The entire event was 
broadcast to the nation. 

One of the nation's proudest 
assets has been rejuvenated by the 
people it has inspired. Lee lacoca 
remembers the day his grandfather 
first took him to see the statue. By 
helping to renovate Liberty he is 
able to share America's pride with 
future generations. 

Lady Liberty surrounded by N.Y.C. sky- 
line and a pyrotechnic July 4tb fanfare. 






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Page 2 








Reagan Contemplates rough waters ahead. 




Oliver North at Senate Committee hearing. 

The Summit that Didn't 



The October Reykjavik meeting 
had the potential of producing the 
most sweeping arms control agree- 
ment in the history of the nuclear 
age. Its proposals included a large 
slash in the number of long-range 
nuclear missiles in the arsenals of 
the superpowers, and would even- 
tually eliminate them altogether. 
The outcome, however, fell short of 
expectations. After two intense days 
of negotiation, Mikhail Gorbachev 



would not relent in his insistence 
that Reagan's highly questionable 
Strategic Defense Initiative, a 
proposed space-based shield against 
ballistic missiles, be confined to 
"laboratory research." Reagan was 
equally adamant that the U.S. retain 
the right not only to conduct scien- 
tific research on new Star Wars 
weapons, but also to develop and 
test them as well. 
The Reykjavik summit was 



Rough Waters 
For Reagan 



Late in 1986, the Reagan 
administration was suddenly shaken 
by the disclosure that it had been 
covertly selling arms to Iran in an 
attempt to win freedom for 
American hostages in Lebanon. 

The controversy has since 
become a full-blown scandal when it 
was revealed that money made in the 
dealings with Iran was being diverted to 
Nicaraguan contras. 

This disclosure has caused end- 
less problems for the smooth sailing 
of Reagan's presidency. Instead of 
finishing off strongly, Reagan has 
become entangled in the Watergate 
of the 80's known popularly as 
"Contra-gate." 

As soon as Reagan had first 
revealed that the U.S. had condoned 
at least one shipment of arms by 
Israel to Iran, there was unleashed 
confusion and doubt. Reagan was 
not able to immediately restore his 
credibility. A week after his initial 
news conference, an ABC Newspoll 
showed not only that 59% of the 
public did not believe Reagan's 
answers, but also that his overall rat- 
ing had fallen 10 points in the past 
two months to 57%. 

Unlike in the past, fancy footwork 
has not been able to resurrect 
Reagan's credibility. The Iranian 
connection is a sore spot with the 
American public, and as more evi- 



prolonged another day with the hope 
of the agreement of historic propor- 
tions in sight. Eventually the 
optimism began to fade. To the 
Soviets, every element of the deal 
hinged on the curtailment of Star 
Wars. When that proved impossi- 
ble, there was nothing left to do but 
offer a grim handshake and go 
home. Plans for the next full-scale 
summit in the U.S. were also can- 
celled. 



dence is revealed concerning the 
diversion of funds to the contras, 
Reagan's popularity wanes even 
further. 

According to the latest sce- 
nario, the Administration's 
weapons deal with Iran was a 
straightforward arms-for- 
hostages swap. Reagan's claim 
that the transactions were an 
overture to moderate factions in 
the Iranian government was no 
more than a rationale concocted 
by CIA Director William Casey. 
Lieutenant Colonel Oliver North 
was instrumental in persuading 
the President to proceed. North's 
boss, former National Security 
Advisor John Poindexter, was 
aware that Iran arms profits were 
being diverted to Nicaraguan 
contras. Casey, too, knew of the 
diversion weeks before he 
claimed he was told. He was 
"surprised" to learn last No- 
vember of the contra connection. 

These were some of the dis- 
closures in a Senate Intelligence 
Committee draft report based on 
the four weeks of hearings. The 
preliminary investigation found 
no evidence linking the President 
to the illegal rerouting of money 
to the contras. A majority of 
Americans polled disapproved of 
the way he has handled the crisis. 




.\n unrelenting Gorbachev arrives in 
Reykjavik. 




Page 3 



Corazon Aquino 

An Unlikely Winner Becomes 
The Heart Of A Nation 



On a platform of faith, hope 
and charity, Corazon Aquino, 
housewife and widow of Benigno 
Aquino, defeated President 
Ferdinand Marcos in a hastily 
called February election. Origi- 
nally hesitant to run for the 
office, one million petitions were 
signed to convince her that she 
would have the popular support 
she needed. 

Marcos intended for the elec- 
tion to consolidate his weakening 
power and convince the United 
States of his popularity. In a 
gross misuse of political power, 
ballots were ripped in plain view 
and voters were intimidated at 
gunpoint. When both the defense 



minister and deputy chief of the 
armed forces publicly denounced 
Marcos and supported Aquino the 
revolution had begun. 

Although at first a stalemate, the 
revolution took a drastic turn when 
civilians were able to disarm the 
combat veterans with a showing of 
faith and acts of kindness. In doing 
so many Marcos' loyalists began to 
defect. Soon after, Marcos found 
himself on an airplane to Hawaii. 
Corazon Aquino then stepped into 
Phillipino government she has since 
been able to consolidate her control. 
Aquino has also been successful in 
repleting the diminishing hard- 
currency reserves from $200 million 
to $2 billion. 





In her first ten months as 
president, Aquino has already begun 
to freshen up the office with an hon- 
esty and humility rarely seen in 
political circles. Along with this 
honesty she still remains faithful to 
the human rights activists who 
supported her and her husband. 

Aquino's major strength is her 
Catholicism which she visibly 
turns to again and again in times of 



decision and strife. Her piety is not 
passive, however. "Faith." Aquino 
says, "is not simply a patience 
which passively suffers until the 
storm has past. Rather, it is a spirit 
which bears things with resignation, 
yes, but above all with a serene 
hope." With this faith, Aquino is 
able to focus the serene hope of a 
country and in doing so is dedicated 
to rejuvenating an oppressed people. 



Royal Weddings 



A Year of 

Fabulous 

Celebrations 

1986 has proved that even in the 
midst of a high divorce rate the 
world still enjoys a lavish wedding. 

Although Charles and Diana's 
wedding might go down as the wed- 
ding of the century, Sarah and An- 
drew gave the world a great fanfare 
in the royal style, without the pomp 
and circumstance. Their freshness 
and vitality were equalled in other 
summer weddings. 

Carolyn Kennedy, the girl all of 
America watched grow up, married 
New York business man Edwin 



Schlossberg in Hyannis Port, 
Massachusetts in mid-July. The 
wedding was a glorious haven for all 
of the avid Kennedy watchers. 

Within a weeks time, another 
member of the Kennedy family. 
Maria Shriver, married Arnold 
Schwarzenegger. Besides the entire 
Kennedy clan the guest list also in- 
cluded some of Schwarzenegger's 
co-stars, including the incomparable 
Grace Jones. 

Other famous weddings included 
Tatum O'Neal and "super-brat" 
John McEnroe, Heather Locklear 
and Motley Cm member Tommy 
Lee, and last but certainly not least, 
Zsa-Zsa tied the knot for the eighth 
time. 



A Nation Says No To Drugs 



Only twenty-four hours after he 
was recruited by the World 
Champion Boston Celtics, Len 
Bias, the basketball superstar from 
the University of Maryland was 
pronounced dead on June 19, 1986. 
An autopsy revealed that Bias died 
of heart failure as a direct result of 
cocaine intake. 

In retrospect, the Len Bias 
tragedy held unforseen repercus- 
sions. Before the tragedy, Ameri- 
cans seemed to have a relaxed atti- 
tude toward cocaine. It was conside- 
red a social drug for the upper- 
middle class and most claimed that it 
was safe, that it could cause no 
permanent damage. 

Yet this one man, Len Bias, who 
had so much to live for, his death 
triggered an outcry against cocaine ' s 




A series of Drug Related 
Deaths Causes A Nation Concern 



omnipresence in our society. The 
word "Crack,"" a very pure and 
potent form of cocaine, became a 
household word, streaked across 
headlines and news reports. 

Soon, the country was in the 
middle of a drug war. President 
Reagan and the First Lady decla- 
red war on drugs, especially in 
the youth circles. Great contro- 
versy arose with the onslaught of 
' 'drug testing" ' employees to find 
traces of drugs in their systems. 
"Say No To Drugs"" became a 
national slogan. Television and 
film celebrities endorsed com- 
mercials commenting on the evils 
of drugs and drug usage. 

The "Say No To Drugs"" 
campaign focuses in on the youth, 
reminding him or her that he or 
she is an individual should not 
be pushed into doing something 
just because the crowd is. The 
commercials were done with the 
hope that they will give people a 
feeling of control over their lives 
as well as encourage children to 
say no to more than drugs. 

Can this campaign succeed? 
After all these years of substance 
abuse, is it possible to re-educate 
the masses and form a drug-free 
society? It will certainly be an up- 
hill battle. However, this cam- 
paign is making one step in the 
right direction: It is educating the 
children. 

Gone are the days when adults 
whispered of subjects considered 
beyond the grasp of children. The 
drug campaign is aiming itself at 
the children, hoping to educate 
them before peer pressure rears 
its head. Maybe the "Say No To 
Drugs"" campaign can succeed with 
the children. We can always hope. 



Len Bias, llniversity of Maryland 
basketball star, victim of the killer 
drug Crack, pictured in the capsules at 
left. 





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Tragedy and Triumph 

Aviation 



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1986 proved to be an un- 
forgettable year in aviation his- 
tory . It was a year that began with 
tragedy and ended with triumph. 

In our technological age of 
moon landings and satellites, it 
once seemed absurd to even think 
that the shuttle could malfunction 
to such a degree that all astro- 
nauts aboard would perish. In- 
deed, shuttle takeoff s had be- 
come routine, televised not live 
but on tape on the six o'clock 
news. America had become com- 
placent, sure of itself, secure. 

The shuttle tragedy came as a 
slap in the face, especially to 
younger adults who grew from 
children to adults during the 
space age. Never could such a 
tragedy conceivably happen. Yet 
it did, and people may never feel 
so one hundred percent secure 
any longer. 

Christa McCauliffe's death 
made that slap in the face so 
much more powerful. An ordi- 
nary citizen, Christa McCauliffe 



America 
watches as a 

reassurance of 
hope arrives 

triumphantly. 



was one of us, and her tragic death 
hit too close to home. It pulled the 
rug from under our feet. 

Yet, now one full year later, 
though we grimace at the anniver- 
sary of the explosion, we remember 
the astronauts with respect. We 
haven't lost our courage. We have 
regained our hope. And with the 
renewed hope, almost as a symbol. 
Voyager flew into our lives. 

It seems ironic that a year that 
began with such an aviation tragedy 
could end in aviation triumph. Pilots 
Dick Rutan and Jeanna Yeager spent 
nine cramped days in a small, oddly 
shaped, lightweight aircraft. Their 
goal: The first non-stop flight 
around the world. And what do you 
know, they succeeded. 

Voyager left Edwards Airforce 
Base carrying 7000 pounds of fuel. 
Special attachments were made to 
the plane to be sure that it didn't stop 
anywhere along its, course to refuel. 
No need to worry, for after nine 
cramped days in the air. Voyager 
returned in triumph! 




Extra-ordinary citizens symbolize the 
spirit of the nation. Christa McCauliffe 
and the co-pilots of the Voyager; Dicl( 
Rutan and Jeanna Yeager. 





Audrey n arrives at Box Office 



Just in time for Christmas cheer, 
"Little Shop of Horrors" came to 
devour the film world with its man- 
eating plant, the Audrey II. 

Starring Rick Moranis, Ellen 
Green and a zany supporting cast in- 
cluding Bill Murray, Jim Belushi, 
and Steve Martin, "Little Shop" 
drew praises from critics and 
audiences alike. 

"Little Shop of Horrors" was 
adapted from the Broadway musical 
that got its start in Greenwich Vil- 
lage. The play, in turn, was adapted 
from the ■60"s cult film that starred a 



very young Jack Nicholson. 

Critics Siskel and Ebert agree that 
"Little Shop of Horrors" might 
become the biggest cult film since 
' ' Rocky Horror Picture Show . ' ' The 
film's brand of gruesome "black 
humor" and psychedelic sets surely 
bring back "Rocky Horror" memories. 

The reasons for the success of this 
film, however, goes beyond its 
outrageous qualities. "Little Shop" 
contains strong performances from 
the entire cast as well as special ef- 
fects that bring the freshness and 
vitality of Broadway to the screen. 





Actress Marlee Matlin in a scene from the hit 
Children of a Lesser God. Matlin is nominated for 
Best Actress 



A great year for Sigourney Weaver 



Sigourney Weaver is no new- 
comer. Since her 1980 hit, 
"Alien," Weaver has enjoyed a 
stable and very successful film 
career. 

Starring, in 1981. with William 
Hurt in "Eyewitness," Weaver fol- 
lowed that performance playing op- 
posite Mel Gibson in the critically 
acclaimed "The Year of Living 
Dangerously." 

Weaver enjoyed her greatest com- 
mercial success in the blockbuster 
comedy "Ghostbusters," one of the 
all-time greatest money-makers. 
Portraying a Manhattan classical 



musician possessed by a three- 
thousand year old ghost. Weaver 
traded wit with the ever-witty Bill 
Murray. 

Despite "Ghostbusters" incredi- 
ble success, 1986 proved to be the 
greatest year for Sigourney 
Weaver's already thriving career. 
She scored big in the sci-fi/horror/ 
action thriller, "Aliens." 

Portraying Ripley, arguably the 
most courageous and enduring hero- 
ine in film history. Weaver stole the 
summer spotlight to the delight, and 
terror, of millions of wide-eyed 
filmgoers. 



Beautiful yet obviously strong- 
willed, Ripley faced an unyielding 
army of murderous aliens. This was 
certainly an enviable role for 
Weaver. She performed her tough- 
talking heroics with bravado yet 
brought a sensitive humanity to this 
very inhumane film with her moth- 
erly relationship with young Newt. 

"Aliens" success has been attri- 
buted to its spectacular effects, its 
deft direction, and its heart-stopping 
scares. And Sigourney Weaver 
brought it all together, earning 
herself a well-deserved Oscar nomi- 
nation. 



Deaf Actress 
Earns Oscar 
Nomination 

Marlee Matlin, just turned 21, 
has intelligence, talent, and sex 
appeal. She also happens to be al- 
most completely deaf. Rather 
than try to communicate vocally, 
she prefers to speak using sign 
language and reading lips. 

So how did this young, head- 
strong woman end up in one of 
the years most successful films, 
garnering an Oscar nomination 
for Best Actress? 

At eighteen months, Matlin 
developed a severe case of 
roseola, an illness that usually 
strikes children and is usually 
accompanied by a high fever. 
Soon after her illness, Matlin was 
diagnosed as being deaf. 

Never one to be easily conquered, 
Matlin began acting at the age of 
eight at summer camp. During 
her college years, she landed a 
secondary role in Children of a 
Lesser God when the play was re- 
vived in Chicago. She soon 
found herself in New York City 
where she met Hurt. Sparks ig- 
nited instantly. Matlin was soon 
hired as the film's leading lady. 

With this kind of detemiina- 
tion and an Oscar nomination for 
her debut performance. Matlin is 
certain to be more than the star of 
the moment. With her drive, she 
can write her own ticket. 



The 1986-87 film season offered a 
sweet table of somewhat bizarre and 
controversial films. "Aliens," 
directed by James Cameron, intro- 
duced the country to one of the most 
horrifying summers in recent film 
history. A sequel to the 1980 sci-fi 
film "Alien," "Aliens" returned 
starring Sigourney Weaver in the 
role that earned her an Oscar nomi- 
nation. Although critics usually 
groan at the mention of the word 
"sequel," they raved over the 
compelling and suspenseful thriller 
of a murderous, mucous- 
membraned mother and her metallic 
spawn. 




A Sensational 
Shocking year in film 



Scenes from Children of a Lesser God with William Hurt and Marlee Matlin; 
Blue Velvet's incomparable Isabella Roselini; and Platoon's war-weary grunts 
Charlie Sheen, Tom Berenger, and William Dafoe. 



Following close on the heels of 
"Aliens" was "Blue Velvet," 
surely the most controversial film of 
the year and, possibly, the decade. 
At once humorous, chilling, violent, 
and intense, "Blue Velvet" drew 
praise from courageous critics and 
long lines at the box office. 
Although some praised the film with 
endless accolades, others offered 
only damnation and curses. No 
viewer left "Blue Velvet" with feel- 
ings of indifference, however. 

Closing out this very original year 
was "Platoon," Oliver Stone's 
vivid and shattering excursion into 
the horrors of Vietnam. Labeled not 
only as the best picture of 1986, 
"Platoon" also was hailed by critics 
as the definitive Vietnam film. 

As we go to press in mid- 
February, the Oscar nominations 
proved superfluous for both 
"Aliens" and "Platoon," while 
shunning "Blue Velvet" with only a 
"Best Director" nomination. 
"Platoon" led the race with eight 
nominations, including two for 
"Best Supporting Actor." It looks 
as if Sergeant Bums and Elias will 
be in combat once again, this time 
offscreen. 

''Aliens," always full of 
surprises, garnered seven nomi- 
nations including a "Best Actress" 
nomination for Sigourney Weaver, 
the first actress in recent memory to 
be nominated for work in a horror 
film. 



Best of Broadway Hits the Big Screen 



A charming and provocative year 
in film, 1986 was remarkable for its 
translation of great Broadway plays 
to the cinema screen. 

"Night Mother," Marsha Nor- 
man's shattering play concerning 
the rights of the suicidal, was 
delivered to the screen with 
memorable performances by Sissy 



Spacek and Anne Bancroft. 

William Hurt, returning from his 
Oscar-winning performance in 
"Kiss of the Spiderwoman," star- 
red in "Children of a Lesser God," 
adapted form the Tony award- 
winning play of the same name. 
Both Hurt and his co-star, Marlee 
Matlin, were nominated for Oscars. 



By far the most successful screen 
adaptation was that of Beth 
Henley's Pulitzer Prize-winning 
"Crimes of the Heart." Starring 
Sissy Spacek, Diane Keaton, and 
Jessica Lange, "Crimes" provided 
for and intelligent, comical, and 
refreshingly witty film experience. 

Perhaps this remarkable year will 



be a beginning of frequent film 
adaptations of major Broadway and 
off-Broadway plays. Broadway has 
always been on the cutting edge of 
writing and directing, and the big 
screen would be smart to present 
these works of fresh talent to 
audiences on its wide scale. 



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The Fabulous Faces of 1986 



Old Faces 
New Faces 
Computerized 
Face 



The beauty, the charm, the heart- 
throb, the unique. These were the 
faces that glittered and flitted across 
the television and movie screens of 
America in 1986-87. Americans 
felt as if they actually shared the 
triumphs and heartaches of Cybil 
and Bruce, Tom Cruise and Kelly 
McGillis, and even Vanna and Pat. 
Each new episode, commercial, 
and movie brought fame and super- 
stardom to these mere mortals . . . 
or were they? 

Splashed across the front of 
every major fashion magazine, 
Cybil Sheppard was the wholesome 
cover-girl of the seventies. With the 
eighties came the pitfall of obscu- 
rity that faces beautiful models 
whom time ages. Memorable for 
her acting talents early in the seven- 
ties, Sheppard returned, deter- 
mined to display her talent for act- 
ing that went beyond a beautiful 
face. 

The television series "Moon- 
lighting" was the scene for Shep- 
pard's major comeback. Playing 
Maddy Hayes opposite sexy new- 
comer Bruce Willis, she helped to 
form a combination that generated 
chemistry not seen since the Tracy- 
Hepburn era. 

Blond bombshell are words aptly 
describing the glamourous Vanna 
White. Dubbed brainless by critics 
who suggest that only on television 
could a person achieve such a 
following for doing so little, Vanna 
is nonetheless adored and yes, 
idolized by millions of Americans 
young and old. She receives twice 
as much fan mail as co-host Pat 
Sajek. Where lies the Vanna mys- 
tique? Perhaps the answer is not in 




Hot Faces of 86: An actress moonlights; Cybil Sheppard. A Top Gun soars; Tom Cruise. A computerized host with software; Max 
Headroom. A silent letter-turner; Vanna White. 



the face and figure, but in the 
woman herself. Her bubbly, 
sincere, enthusiasm has provided 
the spark to the Wheel of Fortune 
success, raising it above the insipid 
blandness of the typical gameshow 
to one of the highest rated money 
making shows on the air. 

Growing up. Matt Frewer could 
never have imagined that his claim 
to fame would come from being the 
world's first computer-generated 
TV host. His voice and face have 
been altered by heavy makeup and 
postproduction special effects and 



as Max Headroom the young man 
from England has developed a near 
cult following by mesmerized 
viewers on both sides of the 
Atlantic. 

When a young Tom Cruise burst 
onto the scene in the movie Risky 
Business, he set female hearts rac- 
ing. The unaffected boyish grin and 
dark good looks made him a natural 
teen heartthrob. Since then. Cruise 
has worked hard to separate himself 
from the "Bratpack" and establish 
himself as a serious respected actor. 
"Top Gun" released in May 1986 



was the smash flick of the summer. 
Following with the Color of Money 
and playing opposite veteran Paul 
Newman, Cruise earned credit for 
his craft as a legitimate talent, while 
his charm and looks have strength- 
ened his niche in the hearts of film- 
goers. 

1986 made superstars as it saw 
some of Hollywood's greats play 
the famous final scene. But for the 
beautiful, talented, and unique, it 
was skies the limit for fame and 
fortune. 




Page 9 




Hollywood 
Bids Farewell 



Although 1986 was indeed a very 
good year for the entertainment in- 
dustry, Hollywood and its millions 
of fans mourned the passing of many 
legendary performers. 

Cary Grant had appeared in 72 
films before his death at age 82. He 
was famous for his suave and 
debonair charm and his angular, 
handsome face. Some of his most 
memorable films include "His Girl 
Friday," with Rosalind Russell, 
and, of course, "North By North- 
west," Alfred Hitchcock's classic 
tale of spies, mistaken identity, and 
murder. 

February 6, 1987 marked the 
death of Liberace, the flambuoyant 
pianist/entertainer. Liberace, al- 
ways a showpiece himself with his 
furs, diamond rings, and gaudy 
costumes, enjoyed a long and stable 
career. 

It was rumoured that Liberace 
was suffering from the immune 
deficiency disease AIDS, but his 



Ray Bolger-83 — The last survivor of that 
immortal quartet that danced down the 
yellow-brick road, Bolger succumbed to 
cancer but will always be remembered as 
everyone's favorite friend, the scarecrow. 



doctors, upon his death, named the 
cause of death as emphysema. 
anemia, and heart disease. 

Ray Bolger. the last ot fhe 
Wizard of Oz quartet died at age 83 
of cancer. Although Bolger was al- 
most universally recognized as 
"The Scarecrow" from The Wizard 
of Oz. he was also fondly remem- 
bered for his role in •"Uncle 
Charley," which provided him with 
his signature tune. "Once In Love 
With Amy." 

Ted Knight also succumbed to 
cancer. He was 67. Knight is most 
fondly remembered as his screen 
persona Ted Baxter from "The 
Mju7 Tyler Moore Show." After 
"Mary," Knight went on to make 
movies and returned to television 
with his own series. "Too Close For 
Comfort." 

The Entertainment world has also 
mourned the deaths of Kate Smith, 
the patriotic singer. Benny Good- 
man, the King of Swing, and also 
the legendary tough guy. James 
Cagney. Scores of generations will 
miss these great talents, but we were 
fortunate to have them with us as 
long as we did. 




Liberace-67 — The Hambuoyant and disarmingly gaudy Cary Grant-82 — Perhaps Hollywood's most famous Ted Knight-62 — Best known for his role of the conceited 
entertainer enjoyed an enduring career, earning the leading man, Grant was always handsome and charming goof, Ted Baxter, on "The Mary Tyler Moore Show," 
affection and respect of three generations. in seventy-two films. Knight died on August 26, 1986 of cancer. 



A Surprising 
Turn of Events 



Mets stage incredible 
comeback over Red Sox 



It had been 68 years, but it was 
well worth the wait. The Red Sox, 
pride of New England were no longer 
going to be known as the choke 
artists. Two outs in the bottom of the 
tenth, no one on base, and the Red 
Sox up 5-3, on a Dave Henderson 
homer and a Marty Barrett single, 
victory seemed inevitable. In fact 
the NBC cameras were planning the 
various angles in which to shoot the 
celebration. 

But it all turned sour. Gary Carter 
ripped a single to left field. Kevin 
Mitchell followed with a bloop 
single to center and the Red Sox 
clubhouse began to show signs of 
nervousness. Nerves turned to panic 
as Ray Knight singled home Carter 
to close the gap to one. Bob Stanley 
came into douse the rally, but he 
couldn't succeed. Stanley's two-two 
fastball sailed past Gedman and the 
game was tied. Mookie Wilson then 
hit a routine grounder which skipped 




through Bill Buckner's legs and the 
most incredible comeback in World 
Series history had occurred: 6-5 
Mets. 

Well, the Red Sox still had Game 
7 to make up for their failures. A 3-0 
lead into the sixth seemed safe, but a 
Ray Knight homer keyed yet another 
explosive Mets comeback. New 
York took home the series 8-5. 





Mets leap in joyous triumph over Boston Red Sox to win the 1986 World Series. The Mets won on their home field in New York. 
Above left, Red Sox pitcher Wade Boggs sits in stunned silence as Mets celebrate their win. 

Debbie Thomas: Champion skater, 
champion student 



Debi Thomas is no ordinary 
figure skater. Her goal may be to 
become the Olympic Champion, 
but she says, "I want to be an 
orthopedic surgeon." 

In 1986 Thomas, at the age of 
nineteen, dethroned Tiffany Chin 
as the U.S. women's Figure Skat- 
ing Champion and then won the 
World Championships in Switzer- 
land. 

Thomas is also attending college 
at Stanford University in Palo 



Alto, California, which makes her 
skating prestige that much more 
special. 

Debi Thomas is a special thrill 
for all American skating 
supporters. Her energetic style and 
hard work have made her a favorite 
of the United States skating fans. 

Yet Thomas never let the lights 
the music or the applause take her 
away from reality. Watching her 
skate, one can't help but wonder 
how she can possibly manage her 



time between the demanding skat- 
ing schedule and her equally 
demanding college schedule. 

She'll immediately remind you 
that she enjoys being on the go. 
She comments that she is that 
much more stimulated by the greater 
challenge that school presents. 

It may be Medical school or the 
1988 Olympics, but Debbie 
Thomas is definitely going places. 



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64 / Football 



The Return Of The 

I EAGLE 




Football / 65 




66 / Men's Football 




Men's Football / 67 




Right Mike Power scans for a 

pass 

Opposite Jim Turner, Up. Up, 

and over 






68 / Football 



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Halloran 

Leads Team 

To Perfect 

Ending 

It was a season to cherish, a page in a lifetime to 
(ofever keep a bookmart< on. It had tseen that good, it 
wos a season of comebacks, and of redemption, of 
tieartaches and aching parts. 

After a roogh 1-3 start the Eagles wrote their own 
history, running off eight straight win en route to a 9-3 
record. 

"We never talked about It much, but we all had the 
same feeling," said senior Kelvin IVIarlin. "We wanted 
to make our own history." 

They hod tDeen the team that had been given up 
on, with a quarterback that undesen/edly felt much of 
the anguish But what the 1986 Boston College Eagles 
did was of storybook proportions, complete with the 
game winning drive In the waning moments in the last 
gome. 

There were no indications that this was BC's year 
after it failed to put the ball in the endzone and came 
up on the short end, 11-9, It was a day fifth-year quar- 
tertxick Shawn Halloran would just as soon forget as 
he was unmercifully booed by peers and alumni 
alike. It was not one of the Boston College commu- 
nity's prouder moments. 

The BC football world was calling for Halloran's 
head, or someone else's body on the field, but 
Bicknell remained adamant. 

"I'll know when it's time," he told the inquisitive press. 
"I'll say it again. This is a team game. If we find out that 
he (Halloran) is not executing, then we'll make a 
change. I'll never make a change to take pressure off 
the kid, but isn't that a sad state of affairs that it would 
even be possible?" 

It was possible, because for over a year (including 
the 1985 4-8 season) it was Halloran who continually 
shouldered much of the blame for the team's 
performance on the field. The following Monday, 
after looking at game film, Bicknell called sopho- 
more fvlike Power into his office and told him he would 
start against California. It was a decision that 
surprised most, a decision Halloran took with class 
and understanding. 

So it would be the Flutie-like Power, with the reputa- 
tion for making things happen, who would be calling 
the signals. 

And things did happen. Power had a 40-yard 
scramble early in the second half that set up Brian 
Lowe's second field goal. Earlier, only fourteen 
seconds into the game. Power connected on a pair 
of third down plays, scrambling 14 years on one, and 
finding Kelvin Martin for another, setting up a Jim Bell 
3-Yard touchdown. In the end, it was Mart< Kamphaus, 
who replaced the ailing Power (out for the year with o 
fractured foot suffered on the 40-yard spring), who 
drove them 52 yards for the clinching touchdown, BC 
came away with a methodical 21-15 decision. 

With a balanced record, the Eagles played host to 
Penn State, who eventually would win the 1986 Na- 
tional Championship, at Sullivan Stadium. They had 
not beaten Penn State since 1983, when the Nittany 
Lions were coming off their national championship in 
1982. Kamphaus would face his Moeller High (Cincin- 
nottl) predecessor Penn State quarterback John Shaf- 
fer. 

Eariy on, things refused to turn in the Eagle's favor, 
and with 1:05 left in the second quarter, Kamphaus 
(damaged ligament in thumb) was forced to leave 
the gome after making the tackle on Pete Gifto- 
poulos, who intercepted him. Enter Halloran. Enter 




offensive continuity. Halloran immediately sent a 19- 
yard right sideline pass to Darren Flutie, then a 10-yard 
left sideline pass to Flutie. Suddenly BC was at the 
Penn State 29-yard line with 0:48 left in the half. But a 
Troy Stradford 7-yard screen pass turned into a 
fumble. But Halloran made his mart<. He was moving 
the offense. 

Early in the second half Halloran found Flutie for a 
44-yard bomb that gave BC six points and its first 
passing touchdown to date. But it was all not enough, 
as Penn State flew home 26-14 winners. 

BC took the next week off to take a look at itself and 
rest some injuries. They flew halfway across the 
country to play Texas's third professional football 
team, SMU, a team on probation. 

With just over ten minutes to go, it appeared that 
the Eagle offense was on probation, as it found itself 
down 31-14. Then Martin made things happen. On a 
fourth and five he found Martin for a 32-yard touch- 
down. Then Martin returned a punt 85 yards for a 
touchdown, followed by Martin's two-point pass con- 
version. But when it counted, the defense simply 
couldn't stop Mustang running back Jeff Atkins (129 
yards, 3 touchdowns, 39 yards on the final drive) , who 
carried six of SMU's final ten plays, nor the clock. BC 
fell short again, 31-29. 

In Brendan Byrd Stadium, they did what they had to 
do. And so did fifth year seniors Stradforn and 
Halloran. For it was Halloran who, in his finest colle- 
giate performance to date, tallied 26 of 36 passes for 
401 yards and no interceptions, while Stradford ran 
90-yards off-tackle to make it 23-7 with 5:36 left in the 
third quarter. 

But Maryland scored 10 unanswered points, to 
make it 23-17, all of which made Halloran's 46-yard 
touchdown pass to Martin with 2:07 left all the more 



crucial. 

"Big? Oh, this is very, very big." fifth-year senior 
offensive guard Steve Trapilo, who bolstered the 
protection of Halloran, who was not sacked once, 
said. "But the biggest thing about it is that, for a 
change, we did things right." And. for a change, 
came away with a 30-25 win. 

Stradford came through with a stellar performance 
(26 carries for 171 yards), as BC scored 41 straight 
points that sent Louisville and Howard Schnellenber- 
ger, home reeling, 41-7. The win gave BC its first back- 
to-back since the Cotton Bowl year in 1985 ended at 
five. 

"It's the first time in a long time that I've gotten the 
ball 26 times Stradford said, after coming within 46 
yards of breaking Mike Esposito's BC career rushing 
record of 2,759 yards. "I felt good out there." 

But instead, the record would have to wait for the 
trip to Morgantown, and West Virginia, a team that 
hurled a cruel blow at BC when it shut them down in 
the second half 1984, seriously hindering the Eagle's 
chances for a national championship by beating 
them, 21-20. a team that finally fell in 1986, 19-10. 

It was a day when the starting tailback (Stradford) 
broke the BC career rushing record of 2,759 (set by 
Mike Esposito from 1972-74) by running for 96 yards, a 
day when a former soccer goalie (walk-on Brian 
Lowe) set a school record with four field goals, includ- - 
ing a pairof 41-yarders, a day when a defensive end's 
wife (fifth-year senior Rick Nickeson's wife Kelly) had a 
baby girt, a day when a freshman (Ed Duron) came 
up with pertiaps the game's biggest ploy when he 
picked off West Virginia quarterback Ben Reed's third 
quarter 12-yard pass in the endzone. In the fourth 
quarter, BC drove 68-yards, capped by a Jon Bronner 
1-yard plunge, to put the game away. 



70 / Football 




The game that was on everyone's mind was Army, 
who embarrassed the Eagles with 503 yards rushing 
from the wishbone (the most ever gained on BC) and 
a 45-14 whipping the year before, 

"No one had to tell us not to let up in this game," 
said fifth-year defensive tackle John Bosa. "It was an 
important win for us. I guess we had a debt to pay 
from last year." 

Senior Tyrone Taylor came through with a 59-yard 
kickoff return that set up the Eagle offense at Army's 
35. Stradford and Army's Jim Brock traded fumbles, 
and with 4;43 left, Halloran patiently found senior 
tight-end Peter Casparriello for an 8-yard touchdown 
pass for BC's final tally and re-opened door for a pos- 
sible bowl bid, 

The idea became more than just a passing thought 
when Bosa sacked a fake Temple field goal attempt 
from BC's three yard line with 3:33. Bosa recovered his 
forced fumble, and the Eagles hung on to win their 
fifth straight, 38-29. 

The Syracuse game would be the last at Alumni for 
the seniors for the first game testing the bowl waters. 

"It was tough to imagine a bowl game a few weeks 
ago when we were just trying to get a win," Stradford 
said after he eclipsed the 1,000 yard mark (with 31 
carries for 184 yards) and BC had taken a decisive 
27-9 win over the Orangemen. "But we turned around 
in our fifth game. That's when we started playing for 
pride." 

Stradford's only score, a 29-yard run, iced the 
game with 1 :34 left on this icy day. BC could now think 
of the warm climate of Tampa because later that 
week, the Hall of Fame bowl extended Its bid. 

But business first. BC had to think about Holy Cross 
and its 10-0 record, and it had to listen, again, of talk 
of David versus Goliath. 



"There's a perception that we're supposed to," 
BIcknell said. "I feel like we're supposed to win. But I 
know that It's possible that we won't." 

It may, for a spilt moment, have seemed possible, 
after Holy Cross got off to a quick start and a 14-0 lead. 
But sooner than one could say "Gordle Lockbaum," 
Halloran, who won the O'Melia Award as the game's 
MVP, led the Tampa-bound team to a 35-14 advan- 
tage, Halloran connected on 13 of 14 passes. 172 
yards passing and three touchdowns. 

"Shawn Is the biggest reason for our turnaround this 
year (and for BC's 56-26 win)," Flutle said, "For the 
longest time, "the only ones that stood by him were his 
teammates and his family. Everyone else Is long 
overdue." 

And so It was on to Florida, the Hall of Fame bowl, 
and a date with Georgia. 

The Eagles took a 20-7 halftlme lead and were in 
total control. 

But Georgia came up with a field goal and on 80- 
yard interception return that made BC's heart beat a 
little quicker. With 2:54 left In the third quarter Georgia 
got the ball back and proceeded to eat the clock. 
Quarterback James Jackson and fullback Keith Hen- 
derson churned out a 6:03 drive that was capped by 
a 5-yard Jackson scurry which gave Georgia a 24-20 
lead. When the Eagles got the ball back, 2:38 
remained and BC found Itself on Its own 25-yard line. 



Left: Coach BIcknell celebrates Bowl win 

with players. 

Above: Sheer happiness. 

Halloran found Casparriello for 14 yards on a third 
and long, then with just over a minute to play, con- 
nected with Tom Waddle for a 35-yard bomb that 
appeared to give the Eagles the go-ahead score. But 
It was called back after Waddle was ruled to have 
stepped out of the endzone. It seemed the end. 

But BC got another chance after John Brantley was 
called for holding Martin, BC had a first down at 
Georgia's 1 7 yard line and one more chance to make 
it all come true. The next play was an overthrow of 
Martin. The next a 12-yard completion to the 4- 
yardline by Stradford. Then with 0:32 left, the next was 
history. Halloran etched his name In BC Bowl history by 
connecting on a 6-yard pass to Martin. Final score: 
27-24. 

It had all come true. 

"I think I saw some tears in his eyes, and he 
deserved them," Stradford said. "Shawn went through 
an awful lot here — a lot more than most people 
could handle — and when It came to an end, he took 
us down the field and he was our leader. 

He lead BC to the perfect ending. Yes he did. 



Football / 71 



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Booters 



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After a successful campaign in '85, the 
Eagles of '86 were out to prove thiat last 
year's upset over George Mason, ttieir 
play-off berth), and this year's number 
seven preseason ranking were not flukes. 
Picking up right where they left off, BC 
opened up with a solid record of 8-4-1 and 
a rank of thirteenth in the regular season 
polls. This early success showed that the 
women's soccer team was well on its way 
to fulfilling the preseason prophecies and 
expectations. 

Under the guidance of enthusiastic third 



year coach Susanna Kaplan, the '85 
squad was able to vault itself into position 
of national prominence. With the success 
of the team also came the all-important 
success in recruiting. 

Although the BC booters did not receive 
the local attention and support they 
deserved, they made a significant impact 
on opponents across the country. A tough 
2-1 overtime loss to number two ranked 
George Mason opened a few eyes and 
reinforced the fact that the '86 Eagles were 
for real. 



Led by senior standouts Sue Hughey, 
Martha McNamara and All-American 
Maria Montuori, ttie Eagles were able to get 
back on track after a sluggish start offen- 
sively. This stability came just in time for cru- 
cial battles against UConn and UMass. 
With a positive attitude, great defense, 
and a revived offense, BC potientty awaited 
the playoffs. 



■ Vinnie Ruggiero • 



74 / Women's Soccer 




Above: Head's up. 

Left: Betsy Ready's spirit of determination. 

Left page: Maura on the offensive attack. 



Women's Soccer / 75 



er Than Expected 





Men's Soccer / 77 



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MDOve: That's using your hea^ 
Right: Lining up for a score 




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V- 





78 / Men's Soccer 



1986 was supposed to be just another 
rebuilding year for the Boston College 
men's soccer program, but to the delight 
of the fans and the coaching staff, the 
Eagle booters played a very exciting and 
highly competitive brand of soccer. 

Tenth year head coach Ben Brewster en- 
tered the '86 season with great ex- 
pectations and a contagious enthusiasm 
for the game. His six years of professional 
experience gained him the respect and 
dedication of his players. The '86 Eagles 
learned to accept Brewster's rigorous 
coaching style and emerged from all the 



hard work with a "let's get down and dirty" 
attitude. 

Anchored by a strong defensive corps 
led by senior Dave Suvak and netminder 
Eric Hasbun, BC headed toward a spot in 
the Big East Tournament as well as the 
NCAA's. The Eagles developed a very 
diversified and powerful offensive attack 
to complement their feisty defense. Eric 
Brown, Eric Wise, and David Sullivan were 
just a few of the players that comprised the 
BC scoring attack which was vital to their 
successful campaign. 

Earlier in the season. Coach Brewster 



realized his 100th career victory in grand 
fashion with a stunning 2-1 overtime upset 
over national powertiouse UConn. With a 
late season record of 7-7-3, the Eagles 
tried to shake off a hard fought 2-2 tie with 
Alabama A&M and a tough loss to a very 
talented Syracuse squad. 

The '86 season catapulted BC from the 
"locally known" category to the billing of 
"national competitor." With a brief stay in 
the top twenty, BC was on the verge of 
something big. 



■ Vtnnw Hu\i\;tcri> 




Men's Soccer / 79 



Inherit the 
Wind 

The Boston College sailing program ended its fall season with a 
strong showing in the Schetl trophy at MIT, This showing typified the 
Eagles' season: solid middle of the pack finishes, occasionally better 
but rarely worse. This is attributed to captains Keith Longson and Steven 
Regine as well as advisor Chris Wilson, all of whom put in a great deal 
of time in the program. 

The team consisted of thirty men and women competing on the 
varsity, junior varsity, and freshman levels. Types of boats used were 
the singlehanded, doublehanded, and sloops. Singles are twelve 
feet long, doubles are thirteen-fourteen feet and sloops are twenty 
six-forty feet. 

With only two years under its belt, the Eagle crew earned im- 
mediate respect from established powers such as Brown, Harvard, 
and Navy. According to Regine, "The team may be young but is look- 
ing for some experienced freshmen to carry on the continued im- 
provement of the program." 



■ Robert Coyne • 




80 / Sailing 



All photos by Mike Dorsi 




Sailing / 81 




Up to Par 



The Boston College men's golf team 
enjoyed a hiighily successful foil season, 
playing very well in thie seven tournaments 
and one match; in whiichi thiey participated. 

Thie highlighits of their tournament run 
included on impressive third place finish in 
the Big East tournament and a first place 
finish in the ECAC Northern Division 
Qualifier. In theirone match, atri-match, the 
Eagles defeated both M.I.T. and Bentley. 

The team was led by senior co-captains 
Mike Hayes and Shawn Hester. These two 



were the backbone of the squad and were 
keys to the productive fall campaign. 

Coach Eddie Carrol was pleased with his 
team's performance. "We had a very 
successful fall. We have a good strong 
team." Carrol acknowledges that BC relies 
heavily upon seniors, but he also feels that 
the younger players lended a hand. "There 
was a good new group of players this year, 
fine golfers trying out for the first time. We 
have some young kids who can play." 

^^^^— ^-^^— Thomas Kenney ——^^^^^—^^ 



/9 



82 / Men's Golf 




Above: Dan Lynch putting for birdie. 

Right; Mike Hayes lines up a shot. 

Left page: Fordie Pitts contemplating his next move. 



Men's Golf / 83 




84 / Women's Tennis 



Eagles Dominate 



The 1986-87 Women's Tennis team was 
the strongest in Boston Coliege history. The 
fall season brought with it the Big East 
Championship, a fifth-piace finish in the 
ECAC's, and a legitimate chance to finish 
as one of the top teams in the East. 

The team started their season with six 
straight victories over Big East and Ivy 
League opponents. The only two losses 
came on a southern trip against top- 
twenty contenders Duke and University of 
North Carolina. 

Co-captains Christina Callahan, Katie 
Molumphy, and Julie Walsh graduated 
with many accomplishments. Callahan 
clinched this year's Big East Team Champi- 
onship and doubles title with junior 



doubles partner, Heidi Kunichaka in an ex- 
citing third set tiebreaker, saving three 
match points. Molumphy graduated with 
a record of 100-39, 3 Big East Titles, and the 
distinction of being the first BC player to 
receive an invitation to play in the NCAA 
Championship. Walsh compiled a 61-25 
record and succeeded in clinching the Big 
East team title in her freshman year. 

Juniors Amy Richardson and Lisa 
Rosamilia both had strong performances 
ail season. The addition of sophomore 
Christie Wood at the number three singles 
spot and returnee Bert Hanna at the 
number five spot strengthened the singles 
line-up. 



Left: Katie tiits a powerful foretiand. 
Left Page: Amy prepares tier return 
of shot. 




Women's Tennis / 85 



''.''\^, i^t-''.,Vl*i-^a!Ji3ft:dDAt/..-' >iiy p-'i-iSXi- lotf ^ 



The 1986-87 Men's Tennis team entered 
the Fall season with a youthful squad, one 
which had only two returning upperclass- 
men from last year's 13-2 team. Seniors 
Stephen Griffin and Brian Bortnick both 
had much experience and success in Big 
East competition, Head coach Mike McDon- 
ald felt this was his youngest team in many 
years and commented, "I was cautiously 
optimistic about the upcoming season." 

The regular season proved to be a 
successful one as BC registered a 5-1 
record. This included convincing 9-1 
victories over both MIT and Tufts. The Eagles 
defeated rival Boston Universit/ 6-3 and 
Brandeis 6-3 but suffered its lone setback in 
a close 5-4 defeat at the hands of 
Dartmouth. 

The Big East Tournament was an event in 
which BC continued to perform well. This 
yearthe team captured its sixth straighttitle, 
the seventh in the last eight years. BC was 
led by Griffin who captured the singles title. 
Teammate Brian Bortwick won the doubles 
championshipto add to his incredible list of 
titles. Bortnick won seven individual 
championships in the last four years, a feat 
not accomplished in any other sport. 

The team also partcipated in the ECAC 
tournament, earning victories over 
Pennsylvania and University of Richmond 
while finishing eleventh. McDonald cited 
tough draws as compounding the team's 
difficulties. 

"I am very pleased at the progress that 
has been made since Labor Day," 
commented Coach McDonald. 
Sophomore Michael Franchi played an 
important role at the number two seed in 
singles, while Steven Singalove moved up 
from number four to three. Mike DeLuca, a 
sophomore, reached the Big Eastfinals, but 
sprained his ankle and was unable to 
compete. The four freshmen on the team 
showed great promise, especially Jim 
Santoro who started on varsity in his first year. 



i:>&i1»Afl.»ain^JI 



John P. Young 



A Stroke of Genius 




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ilen's Tennis / 86 



Geoff Why 





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Above: Following through on a wmn 
riffin returns a backhand down the in 



87 / Men's Tennis 




88 / Women's Rugby 



Up for Grabs! 



BC Women's Rugby enjoyed another 
winning season for the fall of '86. The team 
had a record turn-out this year, with over 
one hundred girls in the first few weeks of 
practice. As the season progressed the ros- 
ter tapered down to forty loyal Ruggettes, 
consisting mainly of freshmen. These and 
other newcomers led the team on to vic- 
tory against schools such as Princeton, 
Brown, Providence, Williams, and Bryant, 
and impressive accomplishment for such 
a young team. 

The starting line-up was comprised of 
many talented backs and forwards. In front 
were IVl.E. Chambers, Meg Lowney, Meg 
Cussak, Maureen O'Connor and Jen 



Trujillo. Backs included Ellen Herlihy, Leslie 
Engles, Julie Doherty, Dawn Mitchell and 
Cathy Nowok. The Eagles' success was 
attributed to the time and effort of Coach 
Ken Daly as well. 

The only big disappointment this season 
was BC's loss to Harvard on a cold, rainy 
afternoon, also known as "the Mud Bowl," 
With such a talented and young group of 
athletes, however, it is only a matter of time 
before the Crimson bows to the Eagles. In 
conclusion, "no one can forget a BC 
Ruggette." 



■ Mario Brehio • 



Opposite: Tripping up 
the competition. 
Below: Locl<ed in a 
stnjggle. 



Geoff Why 



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(90 /Men's Rugby 



Geoff Why 




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Men's Rugby Plays to Win 



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Under the guidance of Coach Ken Daly, 
the 1986-87 BC mgby football club had its 
most successful season to date. Impressive 
victories over perennial pov^/ers Boston 
University, Holy Cross and Harvard as well as 
wins against Babson and Framingham 
State were just a few of the highlights of the 
club's winning season. All four squads 
played well throughout the year, 

Daly felt that this year's club was one of 



the best he had to work with in his sixteen 
years of coaching. The outstanding back 



leadership of Captain Vinny Rella plus the 
marauding forward play by Captain Jim 
Roth helped bring about the Eagles' 
success. 

Seniors comprised the heart and soul of 
this team. Their determination to win 
provided BC with the opportunity to be one 
of the top seeds in the New England 
Championships. 

^ 'Jon Magsino 



Geoff Why 




Men's Rugby / 91 



Set Spike, Dig 



The most important thing to remember 
about the 1986-87 women's varsity vol- 
leyball team is that it was a very young 
team. It consisted of one senior, four 
juniors, five sophomores, and two freshmen. 
Second year coach Gary Gildea led the 
team to an 1 1 -22 season , the best the Eagles 
have had since competing at the Division 1 
level. They finished sixth in the Big East, 
which was another high point for BC. 

Despite the team's improvement from 
previous years, the Eagles did not meet 
Gildea's expections. However, it was a very 



profitable rebuilding yearforBC. More than 
anything, this season proved to the players 
that they were able to compete against 
any Division 1 team. 

The line-up consisted of juniors Midge 
Connolly and Karen Ramsey, sophomores 
Ellen McCarthy, Eileen Hoban, and Rita 
Bettino, and freshman Terri Shanahan. 
Senior co-captain Cheryl Carozza shared 
Bettino 's starting position early in the sea- 
son. Carozza often came off the bench to 
add some flair to the offense. Midge Con- 
nolly, co-captain and last year's MVP was 



still recovering frc*n knee surgery, but was 
still able to provide help when needed. 

Without a doubt this year's powerhiouse 
was Shanahan, a walk-on. She led the 
team in three major areas, digs, service 
aces and kill percentage. Throughout the 
season, Shanahan and McCarthy, another 
extremely strong player, never left the line- 
up and powered BC to their best season 
ever. 



•Judy A. Esposito • 




92 / Women's Vollciy 




94 / Women's Field Hockey 



sticks of Success 






Women's Field Hocke ' 1 95 




Above: Eagles take to ttie field 

Right: Midfielder Beth Keating on the attack 

Right Page: Poised for action. 



96 / Women's Field Hockey 




The Boston College women's field hockey 
team faced a questionable 1986-87 
season, due to the loss of five starters and 
the addition of nine freshmen. Their season 
began with a two-week trip to Holland, This 
not only fostered team comraderie, but 
also allowed the team to obtain valuable 
game experience at an international level. 

The squad achieved an impressive 11 -7-2 
record. At the beginning of the season BC 
was confronted with a losing record, butthe 
team's will and determination shone 
through. This quality of perseverance was 



apparent in their come-from-behind vic- 
tory over Old Dominion. This was actually 
the biggest emotional victory of the season 
for BC and was definitely a turning point for 
the Eagles, 

Coach Morett attributed the success of 
the young team to the leadership provided 
by the three seniors Theresa DeGirolamo, 
Cathy O'Brien, and Laura Ashe. The group's 
accomplishments were a result also of its 
athletic talent and persistent drive for 
perfection. 

Becauseof sports politics, BC was denied 



a very much deserved bid for the NCAA 
Championships. This resulted in an abrupt 
close to the season, but left these women 
with the determination to prove the ques- 
tioning minds wrong, once and for ail. " 

Cathy O'Brien best sums up the season: 
"The final outcome was frustrating for oil of 
us — an NCAA bid would have definitely 
made this a storybook season, All we can 
do now is keep in mind what we accom- 
plished and look ahead." 



■ Melissa Pan and Darren Spongier • 



Women's Field Hockey / 97 




Above: Therese 
Doucette hot on the 
heels of her 

Georgetown opponent. 
Right page above: 
Running at BC is not 
your typical stroll 
through the woods. 
Below: Look at that 
determination, and the 
race has not even 
started I 



Harriers Win New Englands 

Women's Cross Country has been nothing less than a success story at the Heights in 
recent years. After having won the Big East title three years in a row and having en- 
joyed a four-year reign as New England Champs, the 1 986 squad was faced with high 
expectations of carrying on the legacy. 

The team cruised through the regular season schedule with many victories and 
outstanding performances, but there was a stretch when the runners suffered a string 
of close defeats. Not only had the Eagles used the post-season meets as redemption, 
but they also used the meets as a chance to showcase the talent of the team . 1 986 was 
no different. 

At the Big East Championship BC's drive for four in a row came to a screeching halt 
when they were narrowly outpointed by Villanova for the number one spot. Despite 
tremendous efforts by Allison Quelch, Jennifer Weekes, Virginia Connoras and sopho- 
more Gina Braz, the quintet was obviously disappointed. 

Next in line were the New Englands. It was at this meet that the women let their legs 
do the talking as they raced away with the championship for a fifth consecutive year. 
With little time to partake in their fruits of victory, the Eagles headed to Lehigh to try for a 
third consecutive NCAA tourney berth. Paced by senior Connors, who placed 
thirteenth overall, the Eagles were able to finish fourth in the East and second in N.E. 



■ Vinnie Ruggiero • 



98 / Women's Cross Country 




Women's Cross Country / 99 



The Year of the 
Comeback 




100 / Men's Cross Country 



Could senior co-captains Joe Rocha 
and Paul Plissey stay healthy after injuries 
sidelined them in '85? Could a relatively 
young and untested group of runners han- 
dle the pressuresof competition against the 
likes of Big East giants Villanova, Provi- 
dence and Georgetov>/n? These were just a 
levj of the questions concerning the fate of 
the 1986 BC men's cross country team. 

The Eagles responded to these uncer- 
tainties with a very successful campaign 
that more than justified their preseason rank 
of ninth in Nevj England. After a feeling-out 
period, the harriers kicked up their heels, 
put things into high gear and finished the 
year with a bang. 

Joe Rocha emerged as the inspirational 
leader of the team. Seniors David Brode 
and Paul Plissey, sophomore George Grant 
and freshman standout Matt Burkinshaw 
provided Rocha with a fine supporting cast. 
With) Vne National Cross Country and Greater 
Boston collegiate titles under his belt, 
Rocha let BC into the Big East and New 
England Championships with great ex- 
pectations of pulling off a major upset. Un- 
fortunately, the power of their Big East 
opponents was beyond their control and 
BC had to settle for an impressive but un- 
satisfying fourth place in both meets. 

The next test for the Eagles came when 
they traveled to Pennsylvania forthe NCAA 
Qualifiers Meet. Coming off the fourth 
place showing in the NE's the team now 
realized that they hadashot at being oneof 
the top three to qualify for the NCAA's. 
Once again, despite all five runners plac- 
ing in one of the top spots, the Eagles 
finished a heartbreaking fourth, only eigh- 
teen points away from an NCAA berth. 

The Eagles ended their season with a 
ninth place finish in the East. Coach Jack 
McDonald was pleased with the outcome 
of the '86 season, although many believed 
that Joe Rocha and Company deserved a 
better fate. 



■ Vinnie Ruggiero • 




, Above; BC harrrer;. 
on Way to passing • 
,. , Pitt opfbonenJ 
te,ft: Cmon Joe, 
yocf. only HCive half 
p mile to go'. 



Men's Cross Country / 101 




A New Era 



First year coach Rod Buttry brought his 
hard work ethic to a wrestling program that 
needed a change in style coupled with a 
renewed enthusiasm for the sport. One of 
Buttry's main goals at the start of the. 1986- 
87 season was to "make a name" for the 
Boston College wrestling program, but 
more importantly, he wanted his men to be 
recognized and appreciated by the BC 
community. 

Senior co-captains John Zogby and 
Tom Giacchetto played major roles in 
blending together experience and youth. 
A rash of untimely injuries to key personnel 
forced the Eagles to press as many as eight 
freshmen into immediate tournament ac- 
tion. There still were times, though, when BC 
was unable to field wrestlers at each 
weight class, thus making early season 



close losses harder to bear. Once the year 
began, the freshmen started producing 
key wins, and the experience of upper- 
classmen Bill Gallucci, Bob Radochia, 
Zogby and Giacchetto was able to carry 
the grapplers to a respectable .500 mark. 
With. a good showing in the Catholic 
tournament held at Notre Dame in early 
February (despite the loss of Giacchetto to 
a shoulder injury], a more confident team 
returned home to soundly defeat UMass/ 
Boston. Not only was momentum a prime 
factor in turning a slow start into a late sea- 
son surge, but with the New England 
Tourney waiting in the wings, BC had a 
good shot at sending a few wrestlers to the 
NCAA tournament in Maryland. 



' Vinnie Ruggiero 



102 / Men's Wrestling 



f (' '» 




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Left: Pinning the opponent. 
Below: Down for the count, 




Men's Wrestling / 103 



Right: Struggling for the rebound. 
Right page; An easy two points. 




Hoopsters Perform 



The 1986-87 Women's Hoop team 
enjoyed one of their strongest seasons ever. 
The Eagles were "fired up" under 
seven-year coach Margot Plotzke, one of 
the top mentors in the country. Plotzke 
accumulated an 86-74 record over six 
years at the Heights and was named Big 
East Coach of the Year for the 1 984-85 sea- 
son. 

Plotzke could not complain about lack of 



talent this season. The Eagles had a very 
active offense backed by senior center 
Kathy Sweet and point guard Ann Odoy. 
Sweet gained recognition in the preseason 
as a Big East All-Star and earned the honor 
by leading her team in scoring and 
rebounds. Odoy, who led BC in assists, 
dazzled fans with her ball-handling 
abilities, 
Highlights of the season included a 77-48 



win over the Hoyas of Georgetown and a 
Christmas break trip to California to play 
against Dayton, Rice, and Cal/Berkeley in 
the Golden Bear Classic. The Eagles lost 
some real heartbreakers in regular Big East 
play but looked forward to the Big East 
Tournament to prove their poise and power 
in post-season play. 



• Nancy Baran • 



104 / Women's Basketball 



^#-,^ 




Women's Basketball / 105 



Above: On llic rebound. 

Rit:hl; Shooiing lor an easy Iwo points. 

Riiilit pa!;o: Looking lo dish olT Ihe pass. 



106 / Women's Basketball 




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Women's Basketball / 1d7 



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108 / Men's Basketball 




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Above: Tyrone Scott blocks out opponent for 

rebound. 
Right page: Ted Kelley looks for inside pass. 



« 





Eagles Rebuild 



When Jim O'Brien came home to BC on 
March 26, 1986, he came home to an 
empty house, Former BC mentor Gary 
Williams had pacl<ed up and gone to 
greener yards in Ohio, and had left the 
cupboards bare. All that was left for the ex 
— St. Bonaventure coach was a group of 
veterans who weren't quite sure they 
wanted to be at BC. 

But after heart-to-heart talks with the 
Boston College Hail of Famer (O'Brien had 
1,273 career points), peri meter shooter Skip 
Barry and 6'8" shot blocker Tyrone Scott 
decided to stay, and only Russ Doherty 
wanted out, 

And so it was. "Morale was pretty low," 
O'Brien said at the season's outset. "I knew 
we were short on time, but I didn't think I'd 
have to spend it trying to get the players 
back that were already here." 

What the 36-year old O'Brien knew he 
had to do, however, was get players to 
replace those already lost to graduation: 
leading rebounder (5.5 rpg) and scorer 



(18.1 ppg) Roger McCready, four-year 
starter Dominic Pressley (12.2 ppg] and 
backup center Trevor Gordon. Enter junior 
college transfer John Heath and freshman 
Reggie Pruitt. Enter unknown quanttties. 

And it didn't help much when the Eagles 
learned that senior forward Troy Bowers 
would miss the first part of the season due to 
a knee operation, and that Steve Benton 
wouldn't be academically eligible untti 
January. 

All of which added up to a season of low 
expectations. In years past the Eagles 
could always count on at least a few 
games aided by the fan support, but fan 
support proved weak after Big East 
Commissioner Dave Gavitt announced 
that all sixteen Big East Games were to be 
played at the Boston Garden, whose 
seating capacity was 14,890. No long 
would BC play host in cozy Roberts Center. 

But as in years past, the Eagles always 
possessed the element of surprise and with 
Big East Freshman of the Year Dana Barros 



bock to run the offense and witti ttie new 
three-point rule, no one was really sure what 
lay ahead. During his freshman campaign, 
Barros, the only returning exp>erienced ball 
handler, averaged 13.7 points per game in 
35 minutes. 

Also back was the heady Ted Kelley, the 
fifth-year senior who hadn't seen much 
playing time but who was known for being 
a gym rat. Shooting guard Jamie Benton 
was also back, as was Bowers, who 
continually showed flashes of brilliance. 

Boston College accumulated the usual 

total of walkover games, although these 

games proved to be more than in the past. 

BC beat Siena, 66-56, was upset by the 

University of New Hampshire, 51 -49, then ran 

off five straight wins over Harvard (87-86), 

Fairfield, Utica (72-60), University of Maine 

(76-59), and Holy Cross (71-62) before 

losing to SMU, 62-49, and Georgia Tech, 

65-62, in overtime at the Japan Bowl. 

>. The Eagles came back to the States and 

i pulled out an overtime thriller against 

o Lafayette, 90-84. And then it was time; time 

o for the Big East, and all of it parody. 

There were bright spots in all of the BC 
efforts; brightspots that shoneradiantlyfora 
half, then started to fade three-quarters into 
the game, then were all but dimmed by 
game's end. The Eagles were sending the 
message out: If you beat us, you will have to 
earn it. 

They took Villanova to the final three 
minutes, but fell 66-58; took St. John's to the 
final ten seconds, behind Barros' 29 points, 
including seven three-pointers, before a 
delay-of-game was called, settling the 
game at 62-58, St. John's; had a pine point - 
lead on Syracuse with 13:36, but failed to W 
hang on, losing, 76-64. That following S 
weekend, the Eagles lost another moral ■ 
victory in Providence, 81-71, prompttng ^ 
Barros to say, "We need a win. Soon." 

The Eagles got it three days later when 
they upstaged Seton Hall in East Rutherford, 
79-75, sparked by the 30-point, 5-re- 
bounds, 4-assist, no-turnover-effort of 
Barros. But the following week, BC ran into 
an athletic Pittsburgh club, as fell, 80-62. 

Inshort, theeffort was there, italways was, 
but the manpower simply wasn't. And that 
alone was the difference. 

Sean Hennessey 



Men's Basketball / 109 



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110 / Men's Basketball 




Inset: Skip Barry eyeing the basket. 
Left: Ted Keliey scores two more. 
Above: Dana Barros takes a jump stiot. 



Men's Basketball / 111 




112 / Men's Basketball 




Geoff Why 



\ 



Tyrone Scott; Anticipates, Reacts, 
Rebounds. 



Men's Basketball / 113 



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Above: Striving toward victory. 

Right: Coming up for air. 

Right page: Linda Gailus prepares for takeoff. 




114 / Women's Swimming 




striving 

For 
Success 



The Boston College women's swinnming 
team for the 1986-87 season was loaded 
with talent, The women combined hard 
work and motivation to produce what is 
known as a successful season. 

The women rolled to a 7-2 record with 
only three contests left: UConn, formidable 
West Point, and Springfield College, The 
Lady Eagles' only disappointment this sea- 
son had been a disastrous loss to unde- 
feated Harvard, 176-91, and a nail-biting 
142-124 loss to Green Line rivals Boston 
University. 

Coach Tom Groden's squad was made 
up of many talented young ladies who 
possessed the desire for victory. Some of 
the key swimmers were Eagle captain Tare 
McKenna, Mary Lebeau, Molly Schweizer, 
Kristen Murphy, Cathy Lukas, Kim Hanson, 
Kelly Donovan and diver Linda Gailius. 

With a strong finish the Lady Eagles 
could produce one of their best seasons in 
history. 



Women's Swimming / 115 




On your nnari<, Get set. Go, 



116 / Women's Swimming 




Women's Swimming / 117 



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118 / Women's Swimming 



One Stroke Ahead 




After a 155-160 drubbing at the hands of 
the powerful University of Massachusetts, 
the 1987 BC men's swimming team's sea- 
son did not appear promising, But coach 
Tom Groden and his squad did not panic 
as they reeled off four straight victories over 
WPI, Georgetown, Springfield, and Rice. 

The Eagles next suffered a closely fought 
defeat to UR1 123-94 but still maintained a 
4-2 record. As before BC once again wove 



together three straight victories over Bab- 
son, Providence and the University of New 
Hampshire. 

With three meets left Boston College had 
an impressive 7-2 record, second only to 
UMass in the NEISA. The Eagles still had to 
face Northeastern, Central Connecticut 
State, and UConn. 

Some of the more prominent members 
of the team included Alan Johnson, 



Roberto Ayala, Aaron Thompson, F.T. 
Moloney, Tony Ryan and Greg Greene. 
The diving team was anchored by Dave 
Osborne. 

The Eagle swimmers headed into the 
homestretch of their season with a great 
record, hoping to improve upon the start. 



Men's Swimming / 119 



Great Expectations 



For the BC Men's Water Polo team, the 
1986-87 season pronnised to be as 
successful as the previous one in which the 
team reigned as Division II Nev\/ England 
Water Polo Association Champions. 
However, the Eagles decided on a more 
difficult route to pursue their goal, asking 
the BC Athletic Department and NCAA 
during the summer to grant the squad 
varsity status. 

The competition in Division I was fierce, 
including traditional Boston area 
powerhouse Harvard, a well-coached MIT 



squad, UMASS, Yale, and nationally 
ranked Brown. A crucial element from last 
year's success. Grant Levy, was lost to 
ineligibility. Another obstacle was the 
team's failure to find a full-time coach. 
However, these were overcome by 
outstanding contributions on the part of 
individual members. Senior captains 
Roberto Ayala and Tony Ryan provided the 
enthusiasm and skill to bring BC through its 
demanding schedule. Returning senior Jon 
Blood added a hot hand and junior 
captain Randy Teteak doubled as both 



coach and pldyer. Other members 
contributing to theteam'ssuccess included 
Ed Burns, John Arascada and Rich 
MacDonell. 

Becoming a varsity team has begun a 
new era in Boston College's water polo 
history, but the spirit and dedication which 
marked the success of the club has not 
been lost in transition. 



■ Thomas Boyle • 




120 / Men's Water Polo 




















Men's Water Polo / 121 




Looking Ahead 



Despite the lack of a home rink, the BC 
women's ice hockey team was still able to 
compete this year. Although only a club the 
team traveled around New England to play 
against nationally ranked varsity squads 
such as Northeastern, Providence, and 
Harvard, as well as other club teams. The 
team's schedule also included the ninth 
annual Women's Beanpot. 



Thomas O'Malley, a current Boston 
College student, and BC alum Michael 
Santos both coached the team for the 
second year. They brought hockey 
knowledge as well as enthusiasm to the 
Eagles. 

The main goal of the 1986-87 season was 
to rebuild the team. There were several 
newcomers on the ice who needed to learn 



the fundamentals of hockey. Their skills 
improved quickly and they were able to 
add these to the experience of the returning 
players, who included seniors Regan Tuerff , 
Emily Higgins, and co-captains Tara 
Cassidy and Sue Hughey. 



■ Sue Hughey and Kris Johanson • 



122 / Women's Hockey 




Women's Hockey / 123 



Above: Len Ceglarski, the 

winnlngest coach. 

Right: Danny Shea faces off. 

Right page: Danny Shea follows 

the puck into the net. 




124 / Men's Hockey 




Team Strength 



They were the university's wanderers. 
Without a home rink, the 1986-87 Boston 
College hockey team was subject to 
playing ali of its games on the road. 
Undaunted the Eagles roiled to yet another 
successful season under the NCAA's 
winningest coach Len Cegiarski. Ceglarski 
passed the late John Maclnnes of 
Michigan Tech when BC beat the clock 
and Harvard, 7-6, in the consolation game 
of the Beanpot Tournament. 

Seniors who proved invaluable were tri- 
captains Kevin Stevens, John IVlcLean and 



Shaun Real. 

The team's strength was its tremendous 
depth. Each class had a hand in the team's 
success. Hustling Dan Shea and Ken Hodge 
continued to provide the spark that the 
Eagles needed while fellow juniors John 
Devereaux, Mike Gervasi and Chris 
Stapleton added support. 

Sophomore Craig Janney lived up to 
expectations by pacing the team in 
scoring. Tim Sweeney added key goals. 
Defensively, David Liftman split the 
goaltending chores with Real. David 



Buckley and Paul Marshall provided depth 
at the blueline. 

Probably no other class had more of an 
impactthan the freshmen. Greg Brown and 
Brian Leetch hod an immediate effect on 
the Eagle defense, while Steve Scheifele 
contributed to the offense. 

The future looks bright. With the advent of 
the new arena for Boston College, the 
program will continue to grow and prosper 
in the upcoming seasons. 



• Ken Cam • 



Men's Hockey / 125 



Above: Blocking 

the shoT 

Right page: 

Fending off The 

oppxDnents. 




126 / Men's Hockey 




Both photos by Steve Fitzpatrick 



Men's Hockey / 127 




128 / Men's Hockey 




Men's Hockey / 129 




130 / Women's Indoor Track 




Another Winning 
Season 



The blustery winter of 1986-87 was 
warmed up in the Boston Coilege Recre- 
ational Complex by the BC indoor women's 
track team. This edition of Jack 
McDonald's squad had the potential to be 
one of the best in New England. 

One of the major highlights of the season 
was the fact that BC sent one relay of the 
women's team to the Millrose Games at 
New York's Madison Square Garden. It was 
only the second time that the women had 
been invited to the games. They fared well 
by placing fourth in the competitive 



women's mile. 

One of the key victories of the season for 
the Eagles was a 61-55 drubbing of cross- 
town rival Northeastern. It was just another 
step toward a strong finish for the Lady 
Harriers. 

Some of the key members of the 1986-87 
squad were Bev Luken (55m, 200yd 
sprints), Jenny Weeks (1000yd run], 
Michelle Voipe (mile, 200yd sprint), 
Therese Doucette (1000yd run), and Alison 
Quelch (mile). 



Women's Indoor Track / 131 



o\ 



Top: Up and beyond. 

Bottom; Toeing the line. 

Right page: Psyched up for the big race. 





132 / Men's Indoor Track 




On the Right Track 



Aftera successful outdoor campaign the 
men's track team took care of business 
indoors during tine winter montlis. Coactn 
Jack McDonald siiowcased anottier 
extremely talented squad in 1987. The return 
of All-America and multi-talented senior 
co-captain Ray Hawkins ensured that 1987 
was going to be another productive and 
exciting season for the Eagles. Hawkins 
dominated the long jump and triple jump 
scene the previous season, capturing both 
the New England and Big East 
Championships. During 1987, Hawkins 
performed leaps such as 25'5", a personal 



best, inthe long jump, thus gaining national 
attention and copping All-America honors. 
While junior standout Rob Davis and 
Hawkins anchored most of the sprinting 
chores, another versatile athlete by the 
nameof Ken Moody wassweepingthehigh 
jump competition. After an incredible 
freshman year. Ken continued to stun 
crowds with 7'0" leaps. Not only did Moody 
participate in the high jump with senior 
co-captain Jim Maniscald, but he also 
provided BC with a one-two punch in the 
triple jump. In the long distance 
department the Eagles were paced by 



senior transfer Tom Carleo, who qualified 
for the C4A mile. Joe Rocha returned to 
anchor the distance medley and provided 
BC with a big emotional boost. 

In 1987 BC participated in the prestigious 
MillroseGames. Itwos here that BCfoced its 
toughest competition from national 
powerhouses. In February Boston College 
took part in the Greater Boston Champion- 
ships. As a team BC finished third, a mere 
two points behind Harvard. 



• Vinnie Ruggiero • 



Men's Indoor Track / 133 



Right: Attacking the 

course. 

Right page: Cutting the 

comers. 




134 / Skiing 




Downhill Edge 



Since the formation of the National 
Collegiate Sl<i Association in 1979, the 
Boston College sl<i team has been among 
the leaders in collegiate ski racing. 

This past year was no exception. 

Bill Toof, the Eagles' head coach, has 
built up a well respected program in his 17 
years at the Heights and when BC began 
skiing as a varsity squad, just 10 years ago, 
his training techniques and ski background 
helped him produce a top notch alpine 
team with no mountains. 

Toof has attracted some of the best talent 
i n the country to Chestnut H i 1 1 and once they 
get to BC, they produce. 

This year's team had two women skiers 
coming off of All-America seasons, Brenda 
Cunningham and Delores Poodts. Christi 
Hamilton and Ingrid Van Zon are both two 
verytalented skiers whojust finished up their 
senior seasons wearing maroon and gold. 

This was also the year of freshman 
sensation Pam Mercer who attacked every 
slope she skied since her first race as an 



Eagle. 

The men's unit featured only one All 
America this season and he was among the 
most well-known skiers in the country. 
George Abdow won the Slalom and 
finished second in the Giant Slalom at the 
National Championships in 1986. Still this 
men'ssquad relied on the strong leadership 
of IVlatt Quinn. 

Quinn was the captain of the men's 
squad but meant a great deal to the ladies 
as well. 

"He is one of the most outstanding 
individuals anyone ever come into contact 
with,"saidToof."He'smeantagreatdealto 
the team's spirit." 

The concept of team spirit is the mainstay 
year-in and year-out with the Boston 
College ski team. The other concept thotis^. 
also consistent throughout the years is the_J 
concept of winning. 



- John Valente • 



Skiing / 135 




w . & 



136 / Coach Jim O'Brien 




Coach Jim O'Brien / 137 






Is'/--;;; 




■t « . 




■^^■.f: 



t>-^^ 



FOOTWORKS 



The Boston College Dance Ensemble 
was founded in 1980 by students wishing 
to develop the talents and skills of 
dancers within the B.C. community. The 
Dance Ensemble strives to provide the 
individual members, which now number 
forty, with a creative means of self- 
expression by offering both technical in- 
struction in various forms of dance — 
ballet, jazz and modern — and by work- 
ing to build members' skills in choreog- 
raphy. 



The Dance Ensemble is one of Boston 
College's completely student-run 



organizations founded by the university. 
The members of the Dance Ensemble 
manage their own budget, handle their 
own publicity, and design their own 
costumes and lighting. In addition, a 
large portion of the choreography is 
done by the students. This year's officers 
included Melinda Joseph, Director; 
Rowena Tinio, Assistant Director; Megan 
Carroll, Publicity Director; Ellen Roggen- 
sack. Budget Director. 

Joanne Palumho 





All photos by Geoff Why 



140 / Dance Ensemble 







,'i<J,"Mt'^'"t».'^.'i.-:-' 



Dance Ensemble / 141 




The Gasson, Ignatian, and Barat 
Scholars were students matriculating at 
Boston College who hiad achieved a truly 
superior secondary school record (Gasson 
Scholars] and had also graduated from a 
Jesuit secondary school (Ignatian 
Scholars] or a secondary school con- 
ducted by the Society of the Sacred Heart 
(Barat Scholars.] 

PI Mu Epsllon Fraternity was a non 
secret organization whose purpose was 
the promotion of scholarly activity in Math- 
ematics among students. It accomplished 
this by electing members according to 
their proficiency in mathematics and en- 
gaging in activities designed to promote 
the mathematical and scholarly develop- 



ment of its members. 

Sigma Theta Tau was founded in 1922 
for nurses. The Alpha Chi chapter at BC 
was organized to recognize under- 
graduate and graduate nursing students 
who reflect the qualities of excellence in 
scholarship and leadership in the profes- 
sion. 

The School of Management Honors 
Program was the first program of its kind 
established in a collegiate school of busi- 
ness. The program was designed to ex- 
pand the education of talented students 
as they trained to be the business and 
community leaders of tomorrow. 

Alpha Sigma Nu, The Brotherhiood of 
Honor Students, was the National Jesuit 



Honor Society. Members consisted of 
juniors tand seniors from the five under- 
graduate schools and the four graduate 
schools of the university. Qualification for 
membership was determined by scholar- 
ship, loyalty, and service both in and 
outside the B.C. community. 

Alpha Epsllon Delta was a national 
honor society for students preparing for 
careers in medicine, dentistry, and the al- 
lied medical fields. Members were invited 
to apply for election into the society on the 
basis of academic performance and 
participation in activities. 

Alpha Kappa Delta was a National 
Sociology Honor Society which sponsored 
departmental speakers and other activi- 



142 / Honor Societies 



Honorable Societies 




Geoff Why 



ties. Any student with ten credits in Sociol- 
ogy, a. B average, and a total GPA of 3.00 
or better could qualify as a member 

The B.C. Beta Gamma Sigma chapter 
was the only scholarship honor society in 
the field of commerce and business 
recognized by the American Association 
of Collegiate Schools of Business. Member- 
ship was considered the highest scholastic 
honor for a student in commerce and busi- 
ness. 

Dolbro Slovo was the B.C. Chapter 
of the National Slavic Honor Society. 
Founded in 1963, this society was designed 
to encourage scholarly pursuits in Slavic 
studies. IVlembership qualifications in- 
cluded three years of Slavic studies main- 



taining a B -I- average and an overall GPA 
of 3.00. 

Omicron Delta Epsilon was the In- 
ternational Honor Society for Economics 
majors. The society was founded in 1915. To 
qualify for membership, one must have 
been an Economics major for at least two 
years, have a GPA in Economics of at least 
3.3 and a 3.0 overall. 

Phi Aipha Theta was a History Interna- 
tional Honor Society. It was the largest 
accredited honor society in the associa- 
tion of college. Members were elected on 
the basis of excellence in the study of his- 
tory. 

Plii Beta Kappa was a national honor 
society whose members are chosen 



primarily on the basis of demonstrated 
academic excellence. Only under- 
graduate students in the College of Arts 
and Sciences are eligible for membership 
and election in by invitation only. 

The Order of the Cross and Crown is 
the honor society of the college of Arts and 
Sciences for seniors who, while achieving 
an average of at least A - , have es- 
tablished records of unusual service and 
leadership on the campus. Especially dis- 
tinguished members of the Order are 
designated as Chief Marshal and 
Marshals. 



Honor Societies / 143 



ON 
THE 
AIR 




WZBC is the student-operated radio sta- 
tion of Boston College. Its membership is 
open to ail undergraduate and graduate 
students. 

WZBC is located at 90.3 MHz, with an 
outputpower of 1000 watts and a broad- 
casting radius of approximately 50 miles. 
WZBC-FM offers extensive local and na- 
tional news and sports coverage, along 
with cultural, entertainment, educational 
and informational public affairs program- 



ming. 

Under the guidance of General Man- 
ager, Diarx3 Kelley, ttie radio staff organized 
a selective and diverse program 
schedule. Block programming was used 
on weekends, specifying definite, equal 
time for musical and informative listening. 
Musically, WZBC-FM is designed to be an 
alternative music source, with program- 
ming that includes rock, folk, jazz and free- 
form progressive music. WZBC-AM is a 



carrier current which broadcasts to the 
Eagle's Nest. It is at this station that 
beginners in radio gain experience in 
radio announcing. 

WZBC maintains 16 operating depart- 
ments which encompass ever/thing from 
on-the-air announcing (news and sports- 
casing, interviewing), to production, 
business, public relations and sales. All of 
these departments are staffed by Boston 
College students. 



■ Joanne Palumbol • 



144 / ZBC 




ZBC/145 



Pursuit of Excellence 



The Economics Association was a 

student organization open to all under- 
graduate economics majors and thiose in- 
terested in economics. The Association 
provided a ctiannel of communication 
between the Economics Department and 
students. 

The Finance Academy was a student- 
faculty forum designed for thiose interested 
in finance. It provided students withi an 
opportunity to expand thieir grasp of thie 
field of finance and become closer to the 
faculty through joint endeavors and close, 
informal communication. 

Open to all undergraduate students 
who possessed an interest in mar1<eting, 
the Marl(eting Academy gave students 
the opportunity to learn about the business 
world outside the classroom and to meet 
the marketing faculty on a one to one 
basis. 

The Math Society was an organization 
of students interested in mathematics. It 
was open to all, regardless of major. It 
sponsored many social and academic 
events for students and faculty. The Society 
was formed by students who wanted more 
out of mathematics than what was offered 
solely in the classroom. 

The Poiiticai Science Association 
was sponsored by the Political Science 
Department and members concerned 
themselves with academic quality at B.C. 
The association had several committees 
with specific duties to perform. 



The Beilarmine Law Academy was 

named for Saint Robert Beilarmine, S. J. a 
famous Jesuit Cardinal. It was one of the 
oldest organizations on the Boston College 
Campus. The aim of the Academy was to 
introduce students to various areas of the 
law in order to acquaint them with the 
numerous possibilities for lawyers in con- 
temporary society. 

The Computer Science Academy 
was an organization consisting of students 
and faculty who were interested in the role 
of computers in society today. This year's 
officers were, Philip Cooper, Presidents; 
John Hatem, Vice President; Ann Hostans, 
Treasurer; and Joyce Kimbell, Secretary. 

The Accounting Academy was a 



unified group committed to sponsoring 
events for the benefit of accounting 
students and those interested in business. 
These events were designed to inform 
members interested in careers in account- 
ing. 

The Mendel Club was an organization 
comprised of future health care profes- 
sicKXils. One of its rfiain goals was to provide 
active participation in the many different 
health fields. The Mendel Club also provi- 
ded information pertaining to health 
careers. 

The Biology Association worked very 
closely with the fvlendel Club. Together 
they co-sponsored events which enriched 
biology and health related majors. 




146 / Academic Clubs 



Geoff Why 




Academic Clubs / 147 




FLEABAG the 13th 

Fleabaggers commit spontaneous improvisation 



My Mother's Fleabag is Boston College's 
improvisational comedy troupe. This year's 
cast consisted of Jackie Brogan, Michael 
Dempsey, Patrick Emerton, Andrea 
Flanagan, Lauren Hallal, Ronald Jones, 
Tom McCarthy, Kathleen O'Donnell, Peter 
Regis-Cevetta, and Nancy Walls. It was 
produced by Doug Hopper. 

Every semester "Fleabag" put on four 
shows which were a combination of Monty 
Python, Saturday Night Live, and Rome at 



the height of its decadence. Written imate- 
rial and improvs were combined to pro- 
duce a show that attracted sold-out audi- 



ences each performance. 

But the cast did not limit its energy to the 
stage. They werealwaysavailableforchar- 
ity works around the world. Mother Teresa 
had nothing but praise for the "Fleabag- 
gers" who helped to build clinics through 
India every year. And Bob Geldof admits 
that Live Aid would never have gotten off 
the ground without My Mother's Fleabag as 
the headline act. 

— ^^^-^^^^^ Patrick Emerton ^—^^^—^^^^ 
^— ^^^^-^^-^^— A FleahuKRfr ^— ^■^^— ^^^^-^ 



148 / Fleabag 



STUDENT 
GOVERNMENT 

Each year, UGBC, through its many 
committees and hundreds ot student 
members, offered academic and social 
programming to enhance student life and 
to contribute to student input in university 
affairs. It served as a liaison between the 
students and the administration, as well as 
the rest of the Boston College Community. 

The School of Management Senate 
represented the SOM student body. It 
planned academic, social and career 
related events for students and represen- 
ted the student body on many 
committees, including the UGBC Senate 
and the SOlVl Educational Policy 
Committee. 

The Boston College School of Nursing 
Senate was a constituent of the 
IVlassachusetts State Senate Nurse's 
Association and the National Student 
Nurse's Association. The purpose of the 
Senate was to assume responsibility for 
contributing to nursing education in order 
to provide for the highest quality health 
care. 

The Arts and Sciences Coalition of 
Caucuses was established to unite all 
areas of academic concern for the 
College of Arts and Sciences. This 
representative body aimed to increase 
communication within the Boston College 
Community and to provide leadership for 
all A & S students. 




The School of Education Senate was 

the body that officially represented SOE 
undergraduate students by keeping the 
lines of communication open between 
students, faculty and the administration. 
The Senate was comprised of six elected 
senators from each class who elected four 
officers. 



The College Republicans were 
formed to fulfill the primary objective of 
promoting the principles of the Repub- 
lican Party among the students of Boston 
College. Members were involved in aiding 
Republican candidates in their bids for el- 
ection. 



150 / UGBC 




All photos by Mike Antrobus 



UGBC / 151 



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The Cinema Society was a student- 
Rjn organization for those interested in 
special film programs. Ttie society 
screened films ttiat were not frequently 
seen, including classical, foreign, 
avant-garde and contemporary films. It 
was founded in 1983 withi the goal of 
presenting quality films. 

Murray House located at 292 Ham- 
mond St, was the Commuter Center, It 
was a place were commuters could 
meet and socialize outside the class- 
room. It featured lectures, films, and 
Thursday night spaghetti dinners. 

O'Conneli House served the B. C. 
community as the Student Union since 
the fall of 1972. In 1987, it was used for 
many different student-oriented activi- 
ties such as Sunday Night Movies and, 
most memorable Fleabag shows. 

The Programming Committee, 
directed by the Vice President for 
programming, scheduled and 
programmed all social and cultural 
events on campus such as prominent 
lectures, popular concerts. Orientation 
and Homecoming. 

The Coalition for the Performing 
and Visual Arts was composed of 
representatives from the Dramatics 
Society, The University Chorale, The 
Dance Ensemble, and other performing 
art related groups. The group was 
formed to increase cultural awareness 
on campus. 

The B. C. Filmboard presented 
weekly, contemporary movies at 
McGuinn and Newton Campus. 
Members worked long hours to ensure 
that the films would be presented prop- 
erly. 

The Observer was established in 
1982 as an independent campus 
newspaper. It provided an alternative 
viewpoint on current topics pertinent to 
Boston College. While The Observer was 
principally a conservative publication, 
it did not have any affiliation with any 
particular political party. 

Stylus was established in 1882 as a 
literary magazine. The goal of this pub- 
lication was to cultivate literary excel- 
lence by stimulating interest in writing for 
publication. Any student from the univer- 
sity was invited to submit short stories, 
poetry, essays, artwork and photog- 
raphy for the three yearly issues of Stylus. 



Publications 

and 
Programming 





stylus, the campus literary 
magazine 



154 / Programming 




Programming / 155 



AndTfe 




Played On . . . 



The BC "Screaming Eagles" Marching 
Band was one of the largest ex- 
tracurricular groups on campus. The 
Band consisted of over 175 members in- 
cluding managers, twirlers and the color- 
guard. The director of the Band was Peter 
C, Siragusa and the band's faculty 
advisor was Fr. Joseph A. Glavin. 
Aside from halftime performances, the 
band also travelled to West Point as a 
Pep Band and appeared in various local 
parades including the Allston/Brighton 
Celebration day Parade. 



156 / Band 





Band / 157 



Propping for the Future 



The Future Female Executives was established 
March 18, 1975, The organization was particularly 
concerned with the experience of women in the 
School of Management and how it is shaped by the 
roles and interactions of men and women in the 
faculty and administration. The organization hosted 
speakers from various fields to speck about their work. 
They also featured small discussion groups on different 
topics of interest, (President: Patricia A, Summers) 
The Fulton Debate Society has been o vibrant 
force in campus life since its formation in the 1870's, 
Members of the Fulton Society are primarily interested 
in developing skills in advocacy, argumentation, and 
persuasion. The Fulton Society sponsored an exten- 
sive calendar of activities in competitive speech, with 
events in both individual and NDT Debate, (President: 
Mike Jonas) 

The Investment Club was designed to give in- 
terested students the opportunity to develop invest- 
ment skills. Students gained experience by using the 
club's S17,000 fund to buy and sell stocks, and man- 
age the club's actual portfolio. Also, the club spon- 
sored speakers from the investment field. 

Founded in 1958, the Paraprofessional Leader 
Group was an organization that had a dual purpose. 
It strove to serve the Boston College community, and 
to provide selected students with leadership training. 
The group was composed of students who demon- 
strated leadership skills and potential, and who were 
committed to assisting those who desired to develop 
these same skills. 

Personnel/human resource management was an 
expanding field both at Boston College as well as in 
the professional world. The aim of the Personnel 
Management Association was to facilitate com- 
munication between Boston College students and 
human resource professionals. The Personnel Manag- 
ement Association hoped to act as a forum for 
research and application of human resource man- 
agement in the professional world. 

The Transfer Center kept an extensive, up-to- 
date collection of undergraduate and graduate 
catalogues, and a file of educational opportunities. 
The staff encouraged those interested in transferring, 
and transfers to Boston College to visit the office. Volun- 
teers were welcome to assist in staffing thie office as well. 
The Transfer Center was extremely useful in answering 
questions concerning various aspects of life at B,C, 

All Boston College undergraduate students were 
within the jurisdiction of the Student Judicial Board. 
The board was composed of twenty-eight regular 
members and four chairpersons whose job was to 
hear and decide upon cases concerning campus 
regulations. Cases were submitted to the board from 
fact finding meetings by the Assistant Dean, The 
auttxxity of the Student Judicial Board was delegated 
from ttie Dean of Students, Decisions which could be 
reached within the board were "guilty" or "not gulity," 

158 / Preprofessional 



CAREER RESOURCELIBR 



JRCELIB^lIPf 





Mon Cii/iciK 



Placcmcnr 





Preprofessional / 159 




m 




overs and the Shakers 



The Boston College Cheerleading 
squad sought to promote school spirit and 
enthusiasm at pep rallies and athletic 
events. Cheerleaders practiced three 
days a weel<, cheered at football and 
basketball games, and maintained a 
specified academic standard. Each year 
before the beginning of school, the 
cheerleaders traveled to Virginia Tech- 
nological University to attend a summer 
training camp. 

The club has a strong organizational 
foundation and developed into one of the 
most active student groups on campus. 



160 / Cheerieaders 








Cheerleaders / 161 



Below; The Woman's 
Resource Center 

provides advice and 

support for today's 

woman. 

Righit: The Transfer 

Center provides 

orientation for transfer 

students. 

Opposite: The Gold Key 

society — an important 

service group at BC. 





162 / Service 



In the Name of Service 



Masspirg was the largest consumer 
and environmental advocacy group in 
Nevi/ England. Among Masspirg's 
achievements v»/ere the passage of the 
Bottle Bill. Students involved in Masspirg 
could learn skills in research, lobbying, 
and public organization. More impor- 
tantly, students were given the opportunity 
to see how they could make a difference 
OS citizens. 

With over 800 participants, the Student 
Admissions Program was one of the 
largest student volunteer organizations on 
campus. The students had the advantage 
of personal understanding and en- 
thusiasm that let the prospective applicant 
feel more at ease. 

The Transfer Center kept an extensive, 
up-to-date collection of undergraduate 
and graduate catalogues, and a file of 
educational opportunities. The staff en- 



couraged those interested in transferring 
and transfers to Boston College to visit the 
office. The Transfer Center was extremely 
useful in answering questions concerning 
various aspects of life at B.C. 

Ttie Environmentai Action Center of 
Boston Coiiege consisted of a group of 
people who loved nature and wanted to 
work for the earth. The club had a three- 
pronged thrust: Education , Appreciation, 
and Conservatism. All activities were open 
to anyone on campus. Co-Chairpersons 
were Ernest Greembles and Robert 
Sanazen. 

The Gold Key Society was o service 
organization that gave the students the 
opportunity to serve the Boston College 
community. Along with service,the Key 
stressed the importance of friendship and 
community wittiin the organization, as well 
as at B.C. 



f 




Amnesty international was a 

world-wide non-partisan organization 
working for the release of persons 
detained anywhere because of their 
beliefs, color, sex, ethnic origin, lan- 
guage, or religious creed, provided 
they have not used or advocated vio- 
lence. The Boston College group wrote 
letters on behalf of these prisoners of 
conscience, and conducted cam- 
paigns on campus, spotlighting human 
rights abuses in various parts of the 
world. 

The Pro-Life Coalition was a group 
uniting students and faculty from various 
backgrounds who were concerned with 
the rights of the unborn. The purpose of 
the group was to educate the B.C. 
community on the abortion issue by 
providing information leading to a 
heightened awareness concerning the 
phenomenon of abortion. 

The Boston Coiiege Womens' 
Center est. in 1973, was a warm, 
comfortable place on campus where 
women were encouraged to talk about, 
learn about, and explore the many 
possibilities open to women in today's 
changing world. It was a place for all 
women on campus, of all backgrounds 
and beliefs, to gather, learn, and grow 
together. 

The Office of the Dean of Student 
Development was established in 1986 
after the dissolving of Ospar. The office 
oversaw and provided information and 
guidance for all the clubs and organi- 
zations on campus. 



Service / 163 




Patrick J. Emerton 



The open sewers, the 

ramshackle dwellings, and 

the haunting eyes ot the 

Haitian children. 



■■ 


?/•• ■■ 4.-^ 


1 


6a^. 


Wxi^j 




164 / Ham 



True Empathy Results in 
Understanding 




Editor's nnie: Seventeen seniors, accompanied by Fr. Braunreulher. 
sjtcni ilic week of January .<-! I visiiinff the island of Haiti. Much of their 
lime was spent servinfi at two homes run by Mother Theresa' s Mis- 
sionaries of Charity: J'he Home for Abandoned and Malnourished 
Children and the Home for the Destitute and Dyin^. They found 
themselves feedin^i children, chanf^in.i^ diapers and i;ivinf> hack ruhs. 
Despite their efforts to provide comfort, the lari;e number of people suf- 
fering^ from luherculosis. mcdnourishmeni and nef'lecl .seemed over- 
whelming. 

Thefollowinf^ article was written In I'atrick l-.mertun. one oj the volun- 
teers. The article appeared in ihc tebruarv 9 issue of The Heights. 

No one can ever know exactly what goes on in another per- 
son's mind. Objects and events perceived through the senses 
remain as unique images in the mind of he who experiences. It is 
only through adequate communication that we, as humans, 
may try to understand the feelings of another. But even the best 
human communication will always fall short of true insight into 
what someone else "feels." 

How was your trip to Haiti? 

Well ... let me try to explain with this parable: upon entering 
the ward of the Home of the Destitute and Dying in Haiti, the first 
thing that strikes you is a sense of incompetence in attempting to 
help these terminally ill people, to putting an end to their suffer- 
ing. They are so many and I am just one. Your options are two: 
you may stand and stare or you can act. Our man took the latter 
of the two choices, and one took the former. 

The man who acted approached fhe bed of a woman who 
was visibly suffering. By taking patience in overcoming the 
language barrier, he could understand that she had not been 
able to go to sleep. 

She explained, "I am so tired, but I cannot sleep because 
these flies keep landing on my eyelids." 

The man began to wave his hand over her face in order to 
keep the flies off of her eyes. She smiled and began to settle into 
a comfortable rest. After forty minutes of continuous waving, the 
man noticed that the woman was peacefully sleeping. He 
walked out of the ward to get some air. 

When he returned, he asked a nurse, "What is that lady suffer- 
ing from?" 

She looked at where he was pointing and replied, "That lady 
over there is not suffering from anything. She has just died." 

Will I ever know what Haitians feel? No, I will not. Can I ever let 
you know what I went through in Haiti? No, I cannot. I can, how- 
ever, try, through communication, to let you know that the 
Haitians have more strength and love than any other people I 
have met. 

When people have no material possessions to value, they 
become experts in people. It was only through the love from the 
people of Haiti that I could begin to understand their suffering. 

If a hand reaches out to me for help, ! may be able to pick that 
person up. But if a million hands reach out at the same time. I'm 
afraid that I do not have that kind of strength. The only place 
where you can find that strength is inside yourself. And if as little 
as one hundred people find that strength within themselves, 
then, maybe that one hundred people can lift a million. 

To return to the parable: The man who acted could under- 
stand that if he did not bear the woman's burden, her suff'ering 
would never have ended. 

And the man who watched could only cry. 

^^-^^—^—^^•^^^•^—^^^ Patrick J. Emenon -^-^^■^^^^^^^^^^— ^^^— 

Haiti / 165 




Thursday Night at the Rat 



Have you ever danced to "Party Train" 
while ankle deep in flat beer? Well, if not, 
you have not lived . . . or have not partied 
at Lyons Hall which transforms from a day- 
time cafeteria into the "Rat" on Thursday 
nights. 

The "Rat" was the gathering ground for 



seniors who needed a break after a long 
week of studying. Or, it was a gathering 
ground for seniors who just needed 
another beer after a long week of drinking 
beer. Thursday was, of course, the start of 
the weekend, and what better way to 
begin but at the "Rat?" The "Rat" encour- 



aged seniors to talk and laugh and party in 
a controlled environment which remains 
festive. 

The "Rat" also served as a cultural cen- 
ter for fine arts such as airband, chug con- 
tests, and the art of the pickup. Oh well, 
what are Thursday nights for? 



166 / Rot 




Rat / 167 



UPS 
Slli€WirilyHIE! 

The Boston College Dramatics Society 
could always be counted upon to provide 
quality cultural entertainment on the B.C. 
campus, but this was certainly a banner 
year. There was literally something for 

— everyone in the 1986-87 Drama Season at 

the Robsham Theatre. The Drama Society 
showed its many facets, from serious 
drama to sly comedy. 

Shakespearean devotees relished the 
lavish production of "The Tempest" while 
, others were quite moved by the right-to- 
die play, "Whose Life is it. Anyway?" 

Second semester opened with the wry 
comedy "Cactus Flower" and closed 
amid fetes and fireworks with the spectac- 
ular "West Side Story. " It was truly a diversi- 
fied and impressive year for the Drama 
Society. 



^ 



H 



«f> 



'^' 




168 / Drama 




Drama / 169 




170 / Tempest 





<^^^ 



THE TEMPEST ■ 




';*,:7*-J'3t'^a5': 



Tempest/ 171 



172 / Performing Groups 




Performing With Style 



The purpose of the Campus Crusade for Christ 

at Boston College wos to shore the reality and 
relevancy of a vital personal relationship with Jesus 
Christ with those who were interested, and to help es- 
tablish those who have begun such a relationship. The 
two objectives of assisting interested individuals either 
in (1) beginning, or (2) deepening their relationship 
with God were accomplished through a variety of 
programs and activities. These activities included 
small group Bible studies, weel<lv large group fellow- 
ship meeting, and campus-wide lectures and films. 
(President Ruth Yang) 

The Charismatic Prayer Group was composed 
of B.C. Students who believed that group prayer 
within a community added an exiting dimension to 
religious experience. The group met every Tuesday at 
7:30 PM in St. Joseph's Chapel. Each semester they 
sponsor a mini course entitled The Life in The Spirit 
Seminar which introduces students to the Charismatic 
Prayer Renewal in a relaxed setting. 

Boston Coiiege Children's Theatre: offers a 
unique form of creative, improvisational drama within 
the university. This year, the nine-member group is 
performing a children's participation play called 
Marmalade Gumdrops, by Carol Laucl<, at loca- 
tions such as Boston Public Library, Children's 
Museum, Cambridge Public Library, and Children's 
Hospital. They are also worl<ing with the Society for 
Young Victims to write and produce an educational 
play for local elementary schools, teaching kids how 
to recognize and react to dangerous situations. 



(President: Carolyn Dever, Vice-President: Kate 
Sonano, Treasurer: Paul Vasington, and Natalie 
Brostrom, Mark Dever, Elizabeth Dunn, Dee Peters, 
Susie Sonneborn, and Cindy Swank. 

The Fine Arts Union is a student organization incor- 
porating both studio and art history majors, as well as 
other majors who are concerned with creating a rec- 
ognition of the fine arts on the Boston College campus 
and in the community. The Union organized student 
art shows, a lecture series, trips to art galleries and 
museums in Boston and New York, art sales, and 
student art shows. 

The Boston Coiiege Jazz Band was a seventeen 
piece ensemble which included saxophones, trom- 
bones, trumpets, a rhythm section and vocalists. The 
band was comprised of students from all different 
classes and majors. The one thing that all the 
members had in common was the desire to play jazz. 
Different styles of music ranging from big band, 
swing, to jazz rock and pop, were performed. The 
band's schedule consisted of weekly meetings to 
prepare for both on and off campus functions. It 
performed for events held in O'Connell House, the 
Theatre, and on the Dustbowl. 

The Liturgy Arts Group was an organization that 
was formed to replace the Student Ministry of Boston 
College. The Group is a student run organization that 
works closely with the University Chaplaincy to encour- 
age personal gtovAh and faith development through 
participation in the weekly student liturgy. The Liturgy 
Arts Group had several folk music groups that played 



at masses on campus; instruments included guitar, 
banjo, flute, trumpet, and percussion Students in Ihe 
Lecture Group were trained in reading ttie Scripture 
at weekly moss. Students in the Eucharist Group were 
trained as lay ministers wtK> helped distribute ttie 
Eucharist at weekly mass. 

The Musical Guild's purpose was to provide o 
cultural dimension to B.C. ttirough ttie art of music. 
Student, Faculty, and staff were welcome to become 
active participants of ttie Guild. The Musical Guild 
sponsored a variety of musical events. This year, all 
performed by highly acclaimed musicians, the music 
series was excellent, with acclaimed pianists such as 
Vladimir Zaitzev and Monica Zakuc The Guild was 
also heavily involved in the start-up of the Walttxjm 
Philharmonic. This new and promising orchestra pro- 
vided for those of the Waltham community as well as 
the B.C. community the chance to join this orchestra. 
The Guild also sponsored the performance of the 
Boston Philharmonic in conjunction withi thie Conser- 
vatory Chorus, under the direction of Benjamin Zarder 
at Boston College. All events were free. 

The Voices of ImanI was Boston College's Gospel 
Choir which provided many enjoyable performances 
at the University as well as surrounding communities. 
Over the course of the year, the Choir sponsored 
various activities and pertormances on and off 
campus. The performances were aimed to celebrate 
the viability, potency and also the beauty of Gospel 
music. 




Performing Groups / 173 



TAKE ONE 

Student-directed drama adds spice to 

season. 



The 1986-87 Second Season boasted a 
wealth of entertaining, moving, and 
thought provoking piays, all of which 
were directed by students. All of the 
Second Season productions were 
preformed in the Bonn Studio Theatre, 
which was put to great use by the talen- 
ted student directors, 

"Consider Yourself On Broadway," 
directed by Junior Tak Virivan, brought 
the studio to musical life with its review of 
over twenty famous Broadway hits 
against a backdrop of memorable show 
logos. Considering that the mainstage 
presents only one musical per year. 



"Consider Yourself ..." was am entertain- 
ing change of pace. 

Second semester closed with "To 
Gillian On Her 37th Birthday," directed by 
Senior Paul Daigneault. Written by B.C. 
alumnus Michael Brady, "To Gillian . . ." 
was a moving, emotional play that 
charmed two evenings of appreciative 
audiences with its fine acting and profes- 
sional set. 

The B.C. theatre-going community 
looked forward to more quality produc- 
tions presented with the utmost in professi- 
onalism from earnest student directors. 



^'i«»Aaffir->:^fft 



1 74 / Second Season 








''KU 



y-^'^r:: 



•f 



if'- <* 



^i 





Far left and top in blue: Paula Hannaway 
and Jose Calleja from "Consider Yourself on 
Broadway" directed by junior Tak Virivan. 
Middle, bottom and above: Kattiy 
Fitzmourice, Dan Parley, Kerry Dowling, and 
Nick Scandalios from "To Gillian on her 37th 
Birthday" directed by senior Paul Daigneault. 



>^:\ii:*-,<3 






ki^}^ 



The Armenian Club of Boston College was open 
to all whio were interested in Armenian culture, includ- 
ing: language, literature, \he arts, and religion; as well 
as the social, educational and recreational concerns 
of its members ard ttie community. Activities included 
lectures on Armenian tieritage and culture, an inter- 
club social , and an evening in commemoration of Ar- 
menian Martyrs Day. (President: Sylvie Khiorenian) 

The Asian Student Club of Boston College strove 
to broaden ttie horizons of the B.C. Community by pro- 
viding valuable insights associated with the complex 
and intriguing diversification of Asian culture. It sought 
to achieve a unified, supportive network of partici- 
pants who share a common interest reflecting Asian 
awareness. Each year they engage in an assortment 
of activities which include: Cultural Night, socials, lec- 
tures, movies, foodstands, and sporting events. (Presi- 
dent: Christine Yu) 

The Black Student Forum was formed in 
September, 1970 as an outgrowth of the Black Talent 
Program. It was an organization committed to current 
African issues and the African population here at 
Boston College. The Forum provided a social , cultural 
and political medium directed at the black student 
population. 7 (President: J.R. Clark) 

The Chess Club provided an opportunity for 
players of all levels to play the game, both informally 
and in serious tournament competition. The club met 
every week. They had a team in the Boston MET 
league, monthly tournaments open to the general 
public, and the B.C. Open, a major toumoment that 
grows in reputation each year. Instruction was avail- 
able at all levels, beginner to advanced. (President: 
Edward Feldman) 

The German Academy at Boston College was an 
organization whose purpose was to foster interest in 
the German language and culture through lectures, 
films, social activities and other events. 

Le Cercle Francals was interested in promoting 
the study of French culture and the aspects of French 
life. They accomplished this by holding various lec- 
tures, and sponsoring cultural activities, films, and 
trips. 

As a result of growing interest of many enthusiastic 
members, the Hellenic Society was able to expand 
its annual agenda. Members were exposed to a 
broad spectrum of Greek lifestyle and tradition 
through celebrations, social and educational pro- 
grams and religious commemorations. Other events 
were ethnic holidays, such as OXI Day and Greek In- 
dependence Day, community service projects and 
parties with Hellenic organization from their universi- 
ties. 

The Organization of International Student 
Affairs — O.I.S.A. was the club for international 
students at B.C. The goal of the organization was to 
promote intercultural awareness, to introduce the dif- 
ferent cultures represented, and to form a bond 
between American and International students at B.C.; 
and with other schools in Boston. O.I.S.A. was founded 
in 1982; four years later, they have a total of 256 
members representing 35 different countries. The 
board, composed of eight members is elected every 
year. The club sponsored a wide variety of social 
events, such as international movies, fundraisers for 
countries in emergencies, pot luck suppers, talent 
shows, and ski trips. O.I.S.A. organized the Boston 
College delegation for the Harvard National Model 
U.N., attended leadership workshops, and promoted 
college courses of international interest like the In- 
ternational Business course. 

Although O.L.A., Organization of Latin Ameri- 
cans was a Hispanic organization, its main objective 
was unity among the B.C. Community. It provided the 

176 / Culture 



community with an awareness of the richness, 
beauty, and diversity of the many cultures which 
comprise the Hispanic heritage. One of the primary 
objectives of O.L.A. was to assist its members in 
adapting to a new environment. O.L.A. sponsored 
concerts, dances, films, and lectures aimed at im- 
parting a knowledge and appreciation of the con- 
tributions from Latin American countries to the other 
world cultures. 

The Irish Society was founded in the spring of 1981 
to preserve, promote, and protect the traditional cul- 
ture of the Irish. The Society plans such activities as Irish 
singing and dancing, as well as traditional Gaelic 
football and hurling. The Society met in small groups 
for socials where new members were inducted 
through the exchange of Irish traditions. An Irish radio 
show airs on WZBC under the auspices of the Society. 
Several times during the year the Society hosts special 
events open to the public for the celebration of Irish 
culture. 

The Middle Eastern Club was an organization of 
Middle Eastern and American students who all have 
a keen interest in the Middle East. Their main objective 
was to enlighten to Boston College Community with 
regard to the region. Their functions were mainly cul- 
tural, although they were active in the educational, 
social and athletic spheres as well. Their newsletter. 
The Bulletin reported on the interests, opinions, and 
activities of the club and individual members. 

The NAACP — founded in 1909, is the nation's 



oldest and largest civil rights organization. The Associ- 
ation was generally known through the activities of its 
national leadership and staff. The NAACP was the full- 
time advocate for the interests of blacks and other 
minorities, for the down trodden and neglected in our 
society. For most black communities in America, the 
Association was the most reliable and trusting voice 
airing their grievances, articulating their hopes and 
expressing their frustrations — whether it be to a local 
employer or to the President of the United States. In 
terms of Boston College, the NAACP is an intracultural 
organization that was designed to spur individual 
motivation by rewarding academic achievement 
awards such as the Roy Wilkins Scholarship. The 
NAACP tried to promote racial harmony between all 
races not just the minority groups. Their goal was to 
bring racial awareness and harmony to Boston 
College. 

The Slavic and Eastern Circle was a service and 
advising organization as well as a student caucus for 
all undergraduate and special students majoring in 
Linguistics, Russian, Slavic Studies or Asian Studies. 
The year's agenda included a number of social 
events, lectures, films, as well as the more serious busi- 
ness of assisting in course evaluation, program plan- 
ning, and providing tutorial assistance for high school 
and college students experiencing difficulties with 
courses in the various areas of study represented by 
the Circle. 




Preserving Culture 




178 / Chorale 





The internationally renowned University 
Chorale of Boston College has an impres- 
sive one hundred-fifty mixed-voice 
membership. Its unique makeup of under- 
graduates,, graduate students, faculty, 
staff and Jesuits is the result of a highly 
competitive audition process. Throughout 
the rehearsals, they strive to achieve the 
level of perfection demanded by their 
director. Dr. C. Alexander Peloquin. Dr. 
Peloquin has been the Composer-in- 
Residence and an educator in music study 
at Boston College for the past 32 years. The 



Chorale's repertoire primarily consists of 
classical and contemporary liturgical 
music. The members of the 1986-1987 Ex- 
ecutive Board included: Jacqueline S. 
Gradisar, President; John J. Werner, 
Treasurer; Sean M, Carney, Director of 
Public Relations; Maryellen Enriquez, 
Director of Social Affairs; Partrick J. Kuras, 
Director of Concert Organization; David 
Connelly, Music Librarian; Claire Tevnan, 
Men's Secretary; Jennifer McMahon, 
Women's Secretary. 



Chorale / 179 




PERSPECTIVES 



;'W-^li$ 




During the four years that have passed by us so 
quickly, our perceptions of Boston College have 
undergone drastic changes. When we were fresh- 
men, the campus seemed unconquerable, a vast 
maze of converging pathways and looming buildings. 

But as we made our niche, followed our schedules, sought 
out our friends, the campus became merely a backdrop 
rather than a main character. Now, as seniors complacent in 
our established B.C. identities, we may take this vast maze for 
granted, forget how we marveled at its wealth of diverse 
opportunities. 

The following eight people hail from different areas of 
campus interest. They have achieved success at Boston 
College, working for the University and allowing the University 
to work for them. Together and individually, they represent in- 
volvement, achievement, and leadership. Maybe their 
perspectives of campus will remind us of the wide scope of 
Boston College, the vast but conquerable maze that it truly is. 



182 / Perspectives 




Perspectives / 183 




184 / Perspectives 



Jill alpeR 



Jill Alper was the President of the Undergruduaie Guvenimcni oj Boston College. UGBC. Alonfi with numerous other efforts, she 
spearheaded the ' 'Sign It' ' campaign and was both enthusiastic and successful in initial attempts to provide a working social gathering 
policy at B.C. 



Fall arrived and there we were. The leaves 
turned color and so began the 123rd year of 
Boston College history. As members of the BC 
community, we all wrote a piece of that history. 
As UGBC president, I felt lucky to represent such a 
tremendous student body at an institution which has 
certainly been changing at a phenomenal rate in re- 
cent years. Playing the role of mediator between stu- 
dents, faculty, administrators, and Trustees, certainly 
presented an opportunity for me to gain my own, some- 
what unique, perspective of Boston College. 

Easily, you could be proud of the accomplishments of 
your roommates and friends. I saw 
students who worked very hard at 
their studies, usually complained 
about them, but actually did very 
well! BC students are extremely 
career oriented, but I think to some 
extent, pursue a less pragmatic 
education for a more classical 
one. Calling a BC student sociable 
and friendly has got to be one of 
the understatements of the 
century! Even if BC students aren't 
wholly immersed in an ex- 
tracurricular activity (although 
many are], almost all of them will 
become involved in a campus 
group or event in some way. 
Certainly BC students felt em- 
powered to make change. 

BC administrators are hard- 
working, dedicated and they care 
a great deal about students and their concerns. 
Students would be a lot more satisfied with BC and its 
"growing pains" if the University spoke more often about 
its projects, goals, and philosophies in relation to issues 
and services. In a sense it was hard for me and UGBC to 
be more out spoken about some controversial issues for 
fear of having administrators shut their doors in our faces 
at the cost of an effective working relationship that is es- 
sential to get things done. To a certain degree, we were 
forced to engage in the University's unwritten policy of 
"quiet diplomacy." On the whole, even though 
representing student concern can place UGBC in a 
tenuous position with administrators, I feel that UGBC 
and the administration have worked together in the last 
three years more than ever before. 




BC's phenomenal growth is epitomized by its recent 
activities which are aimed at meeting the demands of a 
larger, residence-based, geographically diversified, 
and more intelligent student body than the Jesuits of 
1863 had ever dreamed. In the future it will be important 
for BC to continue to improve the quality of its academic 
standards in order to keep is increasingly intelligent 
freshman classes stimulated and challenged. A more in- 
formal but stimulating academic environment will occur 
only when the University begins to offer incentives and 
recognition to faculty members to get involved in life 
outside the classroom. My friends and I laugh to think 
that we might not gain admission 
to BC these days! 

The area of student life also ex- 
hibits the magnificent amount of 
growth that is taking place in the 
University. The change in the 
Massachusetts drinking age to 21 
brought attention to the need for 
improved facilities and services 
that BC has been working to 
address. The off-campus housing 
problem with our neighbors will not 
be resolved for years unless the 
University can provide adequate 
housing facilities for a greater 
number of students, in the coming 
years I hope there will be more 
faculty in residence who can build 
on the community that already ex- 
ists. Hopefully the reorganization of 
the Dean's office will meet the in- 
creasing interest in extracurricular activities. Finally, at 
the request of UGBC and students, a group of faculty, 
administrators, and students just finished a "Goals for the 
90's" statement which maps out the next ten years of 
student life to meet these and other needs. If these goals 
are pursued, I can't even imagine how great it will be to 
attend this school! 

For the most part I believe that the majority of the 
students think that BC is already great! A unique BC es- 
prit de corps results from the large number of well- 
rounded people in its community. It is my perspective 
that the relationships which people form at BC are as 
important, if not more important, than any other part of 
this unique Boston College experience. 



y^ii M 



(U^— , 



Perspectives / 185 




186 / Perspectives 



Pat murphY 

A senior from Tampa, Florida, Pal Murphy was the area coordinator in the mods. As the A.C. he supervised all of the Resident 
Assistants in the mods. 



The shadows are getting longer as I sit on the 
Dustbowl enjoying a magnificent Indian sum- 
mer afternoon. As memories of the past four 
years roll in and out of my 
mind, a very content, joyful feeling 
comes over me. 

, . . Newton Campus was a 
beautiful place to adjust to 
college life while at the same time 
extending my childhood one more 
year. Freshman year might be 
described as a time of uninhibited 
fun and trying to get by on as little 
sleep as possible. Friendships were 
begun and the doors of 
academia were opened. Hope- 
fully, both will always be explored 
and enjoyed. 

... I lived on Upper Campus dur- 
ing my sophomore year. My confi- 
dence grew by leaps and bounds 
throughout the year. I became 
comfortable at school and with 
my friends. Discovering the reser- 
voir and Plex saved my physical 
and mental health. They are both 
great place to hang out and work 
out. 

. . . Things got kind of confusing junior year. The dif- 
ficulties and rewards of being a Walsh R. A., challenging 
academics, increased involvement at BC, and trying to 
focus my education by picking a major combined to 
create a hectic year. Friendships are tested; true friends 
come through. Attending Masses at St. Mary's and St. 
Ignatius provided me with needed support and strength. 

. , . Here it is senior year. I'm living in the Mods! The 
added responsibilities of being an Area Coordinator 



sometimes became ditticult. Alternating the roles of 
supervisor, landlord, disciplinarion, psychologist, and 
community-builder can be challenging. Many people, 

even long time friends, don't ol- 

'^ffW^^ I ways separate me from my posi- 

tion. Yet 1 have found that if an in- 
dividual is respected by others, it 
doesn't really matter which role is 
being performed. Finding a 
proper balance seems to be the 
key to success. 

Senior activities hove a ten- 
dency to limit all the goals people 
set for themselves. It can be a real 
battle trying to find the right atti- 
tude which will enable us to take 
control of our lives, The Dustbowl 
may be the perfect place to look 
for that attitude. I wonder, a lot, 
about which friendships will con- 
tinue on throughout my life. Each 
acquaintance and friendship dur- 
ing these times has been a 
worthwhile experience. 

My four years at Boston College 

have meant going through many 

changes, learning every minute of 

the way, and most importantly 

becoming aware of my own strengths and weaknesses. 

It does take some effort and involvement, but BC has a 

tremendous amount to offer each student. I truly believe 

that BC has been the best school in the country for me. I 

have no regrets as I leave Boston College, My only hope 

is that I have no regrets as I continue on through life. 

Thanks for the opportunity 




'A.^- 




Perspectives / 187 




188 / Perspectives 



Kerry dowlinG 

Kerry Dowling, an accomplished actress at B.C., wa.s President of the Dramatics Society and performed a number of memorable 
leading roles at the E. Paul Rohsham Theatre. 



"All the world' s a stage, I And all the men and women merely 
players ..." Jacques, As You Like It 



Theater is society. It is both o reflection and an 
integral part of our lives; but we don't always 
recognize it as such. Theatre has been a part of 
society since time began. Pagan rituals and dances, 
storytelling. Christian morality plays, church ceremonies: 
all of these are forms of theatre. 

The human spirit craves theatre, for it is an art, and like 
all art, the audience member must participate freely in 
order to benefit from the experience. In a school where 
liberal arts are stressed, theatre cannot be overlooked. 

As a theatre major at Boston College, I have been 
fajstrated with the lack of support for the arts in general, I 
commend the University for its constant efforts to make 
Boston College a university with superior resources. 
However, I must also say that if B.C. is to truly be a liberal 
arts university, it must demonstrate enthusiastic support 
for the arts on campus. 

It is obvious that the students and 
faculty at B.C. appreciate the arts 
that are provided for them, since 
virtually every .performance of stu- 
dent groups is filled to capacity. 
We have so very much potential 
here on campus. Students devote 
more hours than I can count to put- 
ting together cultural events for the 
Boston College community. I can- 
not help but imagine what we 
could be if given a little more ac- 
tive support from the University. This 
support is provided at present by a 
small number of extremely enthu- 
siastic deans and faculty mem- 
bers. I hope that their enthusiasm 
spreads and fosters a growing 
awareness of the arts at B.C. 

Theatre has been an integral 
part of my experience as a student 
at Boston College. My involvement 
in theatre has given me great personal satisfaction 
through leadership, technical work, and performing. I 
have been an officer of the Dramatics Society for three 
years and have served as Treasurer, Vice-President, and 
currently. President of the organization. I have found 
that, although there is a tremendous amount of work 
required, being an officer has enhanced my theatrical 
experience. I have been able to become very close with 
the theatre faculty and staff, some of whom are advisors 
to the D.S. These people are invaluable to me, and I feel 
privileged to call many my friends. 

Theatre is one place where age does not matter. We all 
work toward a common goal and are equal in the pro- 
cess. This experience has strengthened my confidence in 
myself and has made me aware of how capable I can be 
when given the guidance and advice of experts. 

Occasionally, of course, things have gone wrong. I have 
had moments when I felt completely inept and frightened 
at the responsibility I had taken on. Thankfully, there is 




always a helping hand available at the theatre and I have 
pulled through. There o\e many aspects of theatre in which 
I find I have no aptitude. I have taken classes in directirtg, 
for example, and although I value the experience, I can 
honestly say that I should steer clear of directing, I have, 
however, seen quite a few talented student directors de- 
velop and I believe I am lucky to have been able to work 
with them at this level. This trade-off of talent is what college 
ttieotre is all about. 

Although I enjoy the technical side of Ihecftre, I must 
admit that my heart has alwoys been on the stage. Per- 
forming is addictive with me; the more I do, the more I want 
to do. I have been in many shows here at B.C. and have 
done everything but play a rock. It would be dishonest for 
me to say that large roles aren't thrilling, because I have 
relished the spotlight. But I can honestly say that whether I 
am in a company of six or forty-six, 
the overall experience is the same, I 
think this is largely because, for me, 
the actual performances are secon- 
dary to the comraderie I find in a 
company. 

When I am in a production, I live 
at the theatre, I find that the most 
exciting part of my day is the three 
hours of rehearsal each night Of 
course, during production week, we 
all literally live in the theatre and can 
be found there at anytime, day or 
night. A company becomes a fam- 
ily then, and the theatre its home. It 
is a place where I con go to find 
acceptance and welcome at any 
time. 

The Dramatics Society of Boston 
College is the oldest student orga- 
nization on campus. Since the 
Jesuits first opened the doors of, 
then, a ver/ different Boston Col- 
lege, the Dramatics Societ/ has been providing the com- 
munity with theatre. To those involved, theatre is not just an 
extra-curricular activity, it is a culmination of all our curricu- 
lar activities. We take the light of our learning and experi- 
ence and, through the prism of the theatre, we give back 
to the community a virtual rainbow. 

Theatre has the power to move people, to make them 
think about what is truly important: life. 

A theatrical experience is the giving and receiving of 
love, and I perform because I know that I can give the 
audience a new awareness of themselves. Theatre is 
appropriate in a universit/ setting because students give 
life to the theatre and theatre gives life to all. The Boston 
College Dramatics Society is dedicated to providing 
theatre. I am truly proud to belong to a society of such fine 
people. 




AAAU 



(ruj—K,*~K^ 




190 / Perspectives 



J. R. clarK 



J. R. Clark, a junior, became involved with the Black Student Forum in his freshman year and was its [^resident in I9H6-H7. 



Boston College as an academic institution does 
serve its purpose very well. Its reputation as a 
center for tiighier learning is innpressive. Thie 
collegiate beauty is encompassed withiin thie 
Gottiic schiool buildings and stretchies from thie grassy 
hills of upper campus to thie stadium on lower campus. 

The fallacy in all of this is that Boston College is not its 
buildings or campus but is found in its students and 
faculty. The people make the place. In this area Boston 
College does not allow the ultimate in an educational 
experience to become a reality. 

Diversity among the BC community would permit the 
student to become familiar with different people, places, 
and cultures. Black students at this institution are not 
represented nearly enough to 
seriously call this school diverse in its 
community. Black faculty and 
administrators are even less 
represented. 

Walking across the dustbowl 
becomes somewhat of an isolated 
journey as I look into faces that don't 
reflect the culture that I have known 
all of my life. On the rare occasion 
that another black student does pass 
by, I make a point to say hello. The 
relationship between the other black 
student and myself is special 
because, although we may not know 
a great deal about each other, we 
do share the unique experience of 
being black at Boston College. 

My two o'clock Political Science 
class in Gasson Hall. I rush to get there 
on time. I sit in my seat, listening to the professor make 
some opening remarks. My professor, in the middle of his 
lecture, injects a personal note referring to when he was 
in Harvard in the 1950's, how classes were taught under 
different formats and how he looked forward to visiting 
relatives in Ohio. I wonder to myself how it would feel to 
have a teacher in one of the majors who had experi- 
enced some of the things that I did as a younger student. I 
wonder how it would be to listen to a black philosophy 
teacher or a black pel itical science teacher share some 
of his knowledge with me. How would it be to see a 
black professor tell the class of his experiences at How- 
ard University in the 1950's, when too few blacks even 
had a chance to go to college? 

In Eagles Nest I search the heads for the "Black Table." 




I see two black students I know. I sit down and bum a 
couple of fries and some Coke. The conversation is 
pretty basic. Where is the parly this weekend? I heard it 
was at MIT. Johnny and the Jukes and Screw Your Room- 
mate are not at the top of the agenda. Nobody is really 
going to set up a white girl with a black guy or vice- 
versa. It is not prejudice, just uncertainty. Some people 
do so but not the majority and the majority rules. MIT is 
where most of BC's black students will be this Friday; the 
second big percentage will be in Philadelphia playing 
Temple. 

After a couple of years not meetings blacks, teachers 
or students, one wonders, do I really belong or am I just 
keeping quotas stable. The programs to keep my atten- 
tion, or the attention of the six of us, is 
not really at the top of UGBC's list. 
Three years of trying to be a good 
student, a good person, and do 
something for the Black Student 
Forum is trying on a man's soul, I won- 
der, should I have transferred to a situ- 
ation where I see myself (black) fitting 
in or at least feeling as if I am part of 
an image, Boston College's picture 
does not allow for Black-Americans 
to fit into it. My mother wants me to 
graduate from a good school. Is 
Boston College ail that good even if 
its students overall are so intelligent? I 
think there's more than just two plus 
two to life. I know that BC has some- 
thing like that written on some free 
booklet it hands out. I guess it was 
somewhere in the fine lines. 
Serious efforts must be made if any of us plan on get- 
ting our $15,000-worth of education. Exposure to other 
races allows stereotypes and prejudices to be con- 
quered. Familiarity brings humans to the point of finding out 
that in spite of differences, we are human beings. We all 
have differences, whether we be black, white, Asian or 
Hispanic. What we as responsible members of society 
must do is advocate intercultural awareness. As con- 
sumers at Boston College, we must demand that we get 
the university experience as well as the university educa- 
tion. Black students at Boston College must be increased 
in number for two primary reasons: first, so that the culture 
of blacks on campus can be nourished within itself and 
secondly, so that other lives can be nourished by the 
acquaintance with black students and faculty. Educa- 
tion is the key to defeating ignorance. 




Y- QJlcJk. ^k 



Perspectives / 191 




192 / Perspectives 



Joan keanE 



Joan Keane was an Honor Student in School of Arts and Sciences. Along with her academic triumphs, Joan is also a singer who 
organized her own one-woman show for a crowd of hundreds in Gasson Hall. 



TWO dozen chocolate chip cookies to Keyes 
South, a balloon bouquet to Hardey, and a 
singing telegram to Gonzaga. Gonzaga? 
Where's that?l Must be upper campus, I 
thought to myself as I reached for my map for the mil- 
lionth time. Sure — no problem. Now if only the car will 
start . . . 

The deliveries were getting easier. I had learned to use 
a helium tank, discovered a short cut to the bakery, and 
trekked all over the BC campus — on and ott — in the 
span of a week. Working for Cheers!, one of Boston 
College Student Agencies, though exhausting, was cer- 
tainly a unique way for me to discover Boston College. 

As a freshman, I learned to 
call Newton Campus home. Af- 
ter a long day of Calculus, 
French, and General Bio, it felt 
great to finally get on a bus and 
leave school behind for a while. 
Back in the cramped dorm 
room, the usual freshman blues 
would begin to creep in with the 
setting sun, but there was no 
room for anxiety while scoping 
at dinner with new friends or with 
Plato waiting to be digested for 
tomorrow's class. 

My dorm room could have 
easily become my hideout from 
experiencing college. It wasn't 
that I didn't like this new life, it 
was just that at times I felt small 
on a large campus and quite 
unsure of my capabilities. When 
I answered the advertisement 
for Cheers!, I thought it would be fun to do singing tele- 
grams. Little did I expect that this job as campus delivery 
person would come to represent having the confidence 
to explore all areas of one's college — intellectual, 
social, cultural, and spiritual. 

It is my love of singing that otten coaxes me into 
action. I began singing at Mass with Music Ministry and 
discovered a group of caring people who wanted to 
share their faith. When I made Chorale sophomore year, 
I not only gained friends but also a knowledge of clas- 
sical and liturgical music. Participating in university 
sponsored Cabaret Nights and piano bars lent me the 
incredible opportunity to stage two solo recitals. To have 




the support of different members of the faculty and 
administration as well as fellow students at these events 
moe than ever made me feel the true spirit of our col- 
lege. 

Unfortunately, I could not sing for either my grades or 
my supper. Academics and holding a job became two 
integral parts of my college experience. Working in din- 
ing halls and most recently in the Registrar's Office has 
kept me in constant contact with people. I had fun when 
I worked because I liked to both observe and nurture the 
continuous flow of the college community. Slowly I 
learned the in's and out's of the university and grew to 
respect the different services provided. 

The academic world held 
most of my attention. As an En- 
glish major, I was required to 
read and analyze endlessly — 
but in the end it is still what I like 
best to do. As a member of the 
Arts and Sciences Honors Pro- 
gram, I was given the opportun- 
ity to furhter challenge myself. 
Those classes presented the 
Great Ideas and asked me to 
evaluate them for myself. I fi- 
nally learned to really think — to 
think about myself and the 
world in which I live. 

To me, the Boston College ex- 
perience is undefinable; it has 
something to do with Newton 
Campus, with St. Ignatius 10 
p.m., the line at Baybanks, and 
Mary Joe Hughes' class; with the 
Hallelujah Chorus, late night 
nachos and Pascal's Pensees; it's singing telegrams and 
great conversations and kindred spirits. I've come a long 
way from singing telegrams, but the essence of the 
singing remains ... I found the confidence to explore the 
spirit of the college and the spirit of myself — and dis- 
covered they were in harmony. 
"This song is over — excepting one note, pure and easy, 
playing so free like a breath rippling by ... " 





nJ^_^ 



Perspectives / 193 




194 / Perspectives 



Lenny bruskiewitZ 

Lenny Bruskiewitz was a senior SOM student from Milwaukee. A General Manuf-emeni major. Lenny aha doubled as the Ea^le on 
game days. 



"A secret is not a secret until you tell someone." 

— some ancient philosopher 

Having a "second identity" thiat was a mystery 
to the majority of thie student body was an 
interesting way to spehd thie past two years of 
college life. It was quite a cliailenge to re- 
main anonymous and I thioroughly enjoyed seeing how 
long it took people who thought they knew me well, to 
find out the truth. The best example of this was returning 
to my apartment after games, seeing someone who 
only minutes earlier I had shook 
hands with or maybe even embar- 
rassed, knowing they had no idea 
who I was. Anonymity made the 
job much easier, doing silly things 
in front of people you know, even 
when your face is covered, takes 
much more nerve than I ever could 
hope to have. 

Being the mascot meant seeing 
Boston College people in a dif- 
ferent light, for as much as I was a 
normal student the vast majority of 
the time, during games or other 
activities I had a unique perspec- 
tive on fellow collegians. The 
Eagle felt the tension during close 
games, revelled in the exuber- 
ance of victory, shared in the dis- 
appointment of hopes gone awr/, noticed that at times 
the action on the field of play was nowhere near as 
interesting as that in the stands, and marvelled at the 
spirit exhibited by fellow students in their own worthwhile 
endeavors. Spirit at this school is not necessarily how loud 
you cheer or painting your face maroon and gold; there 
are too many other things going on to concentrate 
wholeheartedly on any one activity. Everyone here has 
their own interests which they pursue even though there 
ore no crowds cheering them on or anyone patting 
them on the back for a job well done. 

One of the most challenging aspects of being the 
Eagle was the necessity of transferring in and out of the 
role. It was necessary for both crowd appeal and per- 
sonal sanity. The Eagle never had a mid-term or stayed 
up late the night before so no matter what the person 
inside was worried about, the bird had to be a macho, 
happy-go-lucky type. This was made much easier by 




the self conscious thought that someone, somewhere 
was always watching. In the same way it was important 
to return to my own life as soon as I climbed out of the 
costume. Besides, strutting around campus would have 
caused more than a few odd stares. 

As the mascot I was afforded the opportunity to travel 
extensively to other cities and other campuses. Although 
each location had points of interest, none could match 
what Boston and Boston College 
had to offer. As far as direct 
comparisons of students go, I 
cannot make an unbiased 
statement since the usual response 
to my presence was a shower of 
obscenities and anything else that 
could easily be thrown. My 
personal view of BC students has 
improved greatly since the initial 
thoughts of a kid from the IVlidwest 
fearing that he would not be able 
to understand a world anyone 
said. Countless hours were wasted 
practicing "pahhk the cahhr." 
Friendships grew from those awful, 
forced introductions freshman 
year into closer ties I had ever ex- 
perienced before. True friends 
were the ones who did not mind waking up eariy before 
a game to help me construct some props that would in- 
evitably be in the garbage can by halftime after a few 
minute of use. 

Looking back, I hove been very satisfied with my 
college experience on both fronts. The normal student 
side has fond memories of four years of the funniest, 
saddest, most tense, and most rewarding times while the 
Eagle half remembers a few laughs here and there 
mixed in with the skits that nobody quite understood. As 
much as I enjoyed my stay I cannot wait to return as an' 
alumnus and be able to enjoy a game without having 
the urge to slide headfirst across the floor. 



/^V<?^>-^ 




Perspectives / 195 




196 / Perspectives 



Christina callahaN 

Christina Callahan is a senior history major from South Hadley, MA . She ii(i\ also been a member of the women's varsity tennis team 
for her four years at BC. A winner of the Coach's Award for her saphatiKin' and jiininr years, Christina served as tri-captain of the 
team her senior rear. 



I have many superb memories of my four years at 
Boston College, but one aspect of my college ex- 
perience stands out; that is participating in colle- 
giate athletics. Playing on the women's varsity tennis 
team for the past four years has been a great addition to 
my life at Boston College. 

As I look back on my four years participating in a 
varsity sport, emotions were filled at times with frustration, 
anxiety, discouragement, determination, and happi- 
ness. I arrived early freshman year for tennis tryouts. What 
a time of anxiety; coming to a new school before the rest 
of our class, feeling alone, and attempting to secure a 
place on the team. As I began my first week, I found that 
there were many athletes from other fall teams, partici- 
pating in workouts. There were also many freshmen who 
were interested in playing on a varsity team. Some were 
on scholarships, but many others, 
like myself, who did not have scho- 
larships, were in high hopes but 
with less assurance of trying out 
and making a varsity sport at Bos- 
ton College. This anxiety subsided 
somewhat as we made the cuts 
and became members of various 
varsity sports teams. I'll never forget 
looking at my name on the roster 
the day final cuts were made with 
a great feeling of accomplish- 
ment and relief, as I'm sure it did for 
everyone who made the varsity 
team. 

Sophomore and Junior year also 
started off with the additional bur- 
den of proving yourself and mak- 
ing the team roster once again. 
Already knowing you had made it 
the previous year was of little help 
when faced with the new "wide- 
eyed" freshmen who were just as 
determined to make a spot for 
themselves on the team. In addition to making the team 
Sophomore and Junior year came the added responsi- 
bility of becoming a more active and supportive mem- 
ber. At the end of Junior year, being asked to be a 
tri-captain with Katie Molumphy and Julie Walsh for our 
senior season, was the highlight of my Boston College 
athletic career. Earning the respect of both the coach 
and the other team members really meant a lot. 

Although my involvement with the tennis team, like 
most sports, has taken up a great deal of time, I feel it 
has enhanced both my academic and social experi- 
ences. With daily practices, usually from three in the 
afternoon until six, as well as tennis matches, home and 



away during the week I learned how to divide my time 
between academics (as a history major), social life, and 
tennis. Many times I have had to force myself to study 
instead of going out and hove also had to miss some 
social events and trips with my friends due to the time 
tennis has taken on my schedule. 

In addition, to our busy practice and match schedule, 
most of our weekends in the fall were taken up traveling 
to tournaments. These trips established some long last- 
ing friendships among the team. Frequently, teammates 
were the only cheerings and support we had. Com- 
raderie, became a great part of our team as we united 
to root for and encourage one another in our matches in 
hopes of combining for overall team standings, as well 
as, individual honors. As an avid football fan, these 
tennis weekends meant missing many exciting home 
football games, tailgating parties, 
and some good times on campus. 
I was able to attend some of the 
home games and therefore, had 
the best of both worlds. 

Participating in a varsity sport, 
has been a tremendous and posi- 
tive aspect on my four years at Bos- 
ton College. I have seen the 
team's standing in the East move 
higher and higher. I have partici- 
pated in three spring vacation ten- 
nis trips, when prior to Sophomore 
year, the team had never gone on 
a spnng trip. Finally, probably the 
most exciting and fulfilling, was 

Y winning the Big East Cham- 

JHfc MMMMMMjd pionship as a team this year. 
^^Hk ^^H|HH '^^y discussion of my four years 
wit ^WBB^ ^ at Boston College would not be 
complete without mentioning the 
many great times I have had with 
my roommates and friends here at 
school. The help and support I 
have received from them, and the friendships, hopefully 
life-long, that have evolved, have greatly enhanced my 
time at college. These people as well as participating in 
sports, have had a special impact on my life here at 
Boston College. It is these aspects, along with many 
other characteristics connected with life at Boston Col- 
lege that I hope will complement what I hove learned in 
the classroom and help me face the world outside of 
Boston College upon graduation. I would recommend 
participating in collegiate athletics to anyone, attend- 
ing Boston College, as my past four years here have 
been oustandingi 




(/.^^■(-^ 



v\l/--' 



/'Jjd'\ .'^^^• 



Perspectives / 197 




198 / Perspectives 



Peter giambancO 

Peter Giambanco, a senior accounting major, cammiiies daily from Westwood. twenty miles from campus. Peter has been actively 
involved in the BC Marching Band, serving as drum major for three years. 



I still vividly remember the first time I stepped into the 
C-L-X dorm room which was to be my home for o 
whole week for band camp. I was a freshman and I 
felt like I was stepping into a prison cell block. There was 
no shade, a desk lamp with no bulb, and an iron frame 
supporting a bare mattress. A little voice inside me re- 
minded me that I would be here for only one week and 
not on entire semester. I later found that all the dorms 
weren't as cramped or confining. If not, I would have felt 
sorry for the poor students who had to actually live on 
campus for four years. 

I know that there are good and bad things about 
being a commuter or a resident. For me, the experience 
of having friends who lived on campus and my brief 
experience of campus residency has led me to 
appreciate living at home. 

The first question I get when I say that I commute is 
"Don't you feel you're not getting the full 
college experience and not getting a 
chance to become involved?" I've 
heard that quite a few times and have 
always returned with the same re- 
sponse. What you put into any situation 
is exactly what you will get out of it. If you 
want to get involved,you do it. If you 
don't, you lose out. I'd never say that 
meeting a new group of people is easy, 
but you're going to have to introduce 
yourself to someone you don't know 
sooner or later. I was one who was deter- 
mined to get involved. 

My first step was joining the B.C. Mar- 
ching Band. There were over 150 mem- 
bers in the band and everyone was very 
friendly, outgoing, and responsive, 
making it quite easy to meet people 
and make friends. Sophomore year 
through senior year, I acted as one of 
the Drum Majors, so I had to be even 
more in tune with making friends and 
communicating socially. Over the 
years, I've been involved in intramural 
football, jazz ensemble, and pep band, so I've been 
pretty active socially. 

But one very important social aspect in the college life 
is parties. Herein lies one disadvantage for the com- 
muter. Not to say that we don't go to parties, its just that 
we have to drive safely home while residents can stagger 
across campus to their dorms. Which brings me to a 
second disadvantage ... the traveling. We have to face 
traffic before our first class, meaning we have to leave 
the house anywhere from forty-five minutes to over an 
hour before the class even begins. 

If you have a class on Newton Campus and you park 
in a lot unclearly designated "Faculty and staff" you 
would get a ticket. The commuters pet peeve: Tickets 
and parking stickers. You would think police would have 
better things to do than trouble us with trivial parking 
tickets. Furthermore, if we arrive in a car with no parking 




sticker, we get hassled by the entrance attendants. They 
think the automobile is infallible and should never break 
down. Heaven forbid if you have to drive in another cor 
to school that doesn't have a sticker and it is your only 
means to school. 

At this point, I've painted quite a dreary portrait of the 
life of the commuter. But let me mention some of the 
many benefits of commuting. To be frank, I would 
choose commuting over residential life any day. 

After classes I get to go home, I cherish this separation 
from campus very much, I am able to get away from the 
school atmosphere and relax in my very familiar and 
comfortable home surrounding. I am able to get away 
from campus and enjoy going out with my friends at 
home or staying in for a quiet night with my family. The 
resident cannot do this. In many ways, the resident has 
no privacy at all. 

Another great attribute is the famous 
home cooking! I don't envy those stu- 
dents who have to trudge across cam- 
pus in terrible weather only to face a 
slightly warm meal of cafeteria food. 

The major obstacle facing the com- 
muter is time. We hove to leave home 
earlier for class. We must do our home- 
work earlier because we might have to 
work that day or mow the lawn, or do 
other chores and still have time to study 
for a test. It is here that the commuter is 
able to learn how to manage his time. I 
feel time management is a very impor- 
tant skill that is utilized throughout life. 
The commuter, through experience, 
learns that he must manage time and 
manage it well. 

I hear from residents, all too often, that 
I am missing out on the maturing col- 
lege experience of living away from 
home and becoming an individual. I 
am told that residents ore better pre- 
pared to survive in the outside world. I 
cannot, however side with this view. 
Resident or commuter. Mom and Dad ore probably 
paying for some or al I of tuition. For the resident, this goes 
on to include housing and board. Furthermore, residents 
are, in many ways, cut off from the outside world. Com- 
muters ore already dealing with the real life problems 
that occur outside the home. Most of us have our own 
cars that we have to pay for along with the expenses 
needed to keep them running. 

Now, I'm not trying to start a controversy. I'd like to 
conclude with a small bit of advice for all B.C. commu- 
ters. Even though you don't live on campus, you can get 
very involved with campus life and enjoy both college 
life and home life to the fullest. Just take that jump 
forward and get involved. 




^j-C'.'-'^-^-sr 



^ 



w-A- 




STUDENT LIFE 



"'■v. 





Above left: Calvin Klein's latest line of party wear. 

Above right: "Lost my toga, but not my cup." 

Above: "Which way to the fonjm?" 

Right: "Hi Mom!" 



Parties / 202 





It's three o'clock on a Friday afternoon in 
on off-campus apartment somewiiere on 
Strathmore Road. 

Party Patty: "Hey guys! Let's have a party! 

Academic Alice: "No, I have too much 

work to do." 

Lazy Lucy: "Nah, besides, it'll be such a 

hassle and I'd have to walk all the way to 

BayBanks to get money," 

Apathetic Ann: "I don't care. I'm kind of sick 

of parties. It's the same old thing." 

Party Patty: "C'mon you guys, it'll be fun — 

we could have a theme party." 

Lazy Lucy: "Atheme party? You mean like a 

toga party?" 



Academic Alice: "I learned how to make 
togas in my high school Latin class." 
Party Patty: "Great! I'll call Jamaica Liquors 
for the kegs — they deliver." 

Toga parties were probably the most 
common but certainly not the only 
alternative to the basic keg party. There 
werealso boxer shortparties, where thegirls 
got to show off their legs and the guys got to 
show off their underwear. Or how about 
those mid-winter beach parties? Tropical 
dress was the ticket in, but after six 
Hawaiian Punch and vodka drinks, you 
were ready to check out. Who could forget 
the tacky dress parties? On second 



thought, maybe you already have. There 
were plaid shirts worn with flood-length 
pants, 100% polyester dresses and an 
abundance of vinyl. Sometimes it was hard 
to tell who hod tried to dress tacky and who 
were in their normal garb. 

Though the attire was different, the some 
fundamental socializing, merriment, and 
drinking transpired. There was one 
underlying difference; you didn't hit MA's 
for a nightcap after o toga, boxer short, 
tropical or tacky dress party ... or maybe 
you did?! 



- Joanne Conte • 






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204 / Eating 



when Hunger Calls . 



4 



This morning the alarm went off at seven a.m., but I 
slept right through it. I skipped breakfast. I had every 
intention of eating, but as I v^hipped open the 
refrigerator door, the mayonnaise and Wishbone 
salad dressing were the only things staring me in the 
face. I thought I had better just skip it, 

11:30 — Only fifteen more minutes left in class, I'm 
really hungry. My stomach is making extremely loud 
gurgling noises. I know that because the girl next to 
me is giving me dirty looks. IVIy mouth is watering. At 
this point I could even bring myself to eat a greasy 
burger at Lyons. But I'm really not in the mood to wait in 
line, I want instant satisfaction. Maybe I'll go to 
McElroy and make a nice big salad with tuna fish. 



Actually, I'm really getting sick of tuna. 

" . . .What? I'm sorry, could you repeat the ques- 
tion? I was just fantasizing about tuna salad." Eagles' 
Nest is my next alternative. I really don't know if I'm up 
for eating with the dogs today. I'm just going to go to 
Gushing to get peanut butter and cheese crackers — 
love those additives and preservatives, I better not — 
too many calories. 

Class is finally over, the Rat is calling me. Wait! 
There's Christine, my little freshman friend. Hey Chris- 
tine, how about lunch? 



tt 



• Melissa Russo • 




Opposite page top: Students enjoy fine dining in 

Eagles' Nest. 

Opposite page bottom: Whiat's thiis? An alternative to 

Eagles' food? Tastes ttie some. 

Left: A Coke and a ctiat in between class. 



Photos by Irish McWilliams 



Eating / 205 



STUDENT V. 
DISEASES 




Aris Galian 



"PROCRASTIOTTIS" 

Symptoms: Students displaying the' 
acute desire to read a magazine or go tc 
White Mountain instead of doing theii 
assignments are diagnosed as having, 
this ailment. Carriers of this disease 
frequently can he heard saying, "I have 
so much work to do this week; I'll start 
tomorrow." These students often stajt 
final papers at 12:00 the night before 
they are due. The motto of this student- 
disease carrier is: "Never put off until 
tomorrow what you can do next week 
next month, or next ..." Researct 
projects have heen started in this area 
hut completion dates are not foreseen. 



"BROWIT 
NOSEROSIS" 

Symptoms: Students who meet their 
professors an hour hefore class and 
buy them breakfast before walking to 
class with them, send Valentine's Day 
cards to their Economics teachers, or 
are seen presenting apples to in- 
structors prior to a History discussion 
are sure victims of this disease. 
Students who suffer from this sick- 
ness may also develop brown spots on 
the tips of their noses or sprained 
backs from paying homage to the 
teacher whose class they have missed 
the most times a semester. Finally 
these students are often times os- 
tracized by their classmates and 
spend a fortune on ear-nose-and- 
throat specialists trying to get the 
brown spots removed. 



^ 



206 / Maladies 





memory for daytime and nighttime TV scheduling. This 
increase of TV watching necessitates the growth of addi- 
tional eyes on the victim. 



•Joanne Conic 



Aris Galian 



"COUCH POTATO" 



Symptoms: The Couch Potato is the BC student who has never 
seen the inside of the Plex, Theatre, Football Stadium or T A student 
who has this disease spends a lot of time glued to the television set. 
If a couch potato lives in your apartment, you find you can save a 
fortiine on TV Guides because this disease increases the carrier's 




Aris Galian 



Maladies / 207 




208 / Student Jobs 




EMPLOYMENT 



With the cost of higher education in- 
creasing across the country and the 
amount of financial aid available 
decreasing, more and more students 
sought part-time jobs to help line their 
empty pockets. Many students were 
awarded work-study positions in their 
financial aid packages. In September 
these students scrambled for the best 
available jobs, either in dining service, 
O'Neill, as dorm receptionists or in the Plex. 

Students without work-study could scan 
the Heights' want-ads to find jobs babysit- 
ting, housecleaning, and other service- 
related jobs in the Newton-Chestnut Hill 
area. Job listings were also available in the 
"Job Locator" office in Lyons Hall, where 
students could find employment on or off 
campus in various fields. 

Many students often made use of their 
own talents to earn spending money. By 
tutoring, typing, or teaching violin lessons, 
students not only made money, but also 
learned to mar1<et their skills. No matter 
what the nature, jobs gave students a taste 
of the "real world" while still in school. 



■ Joanne Come 



Student Jobs / 209 



PfB' 6$m 



A crisp October wind blew crinl<led 
leaves across campus as one by one the 
cars rolled toward Alumni field. Under thie 
icy blue sky thiey double-parked on 
sidewalks and thie front lawn of More Hall. 
Blankets were spread to claim territory on 
Shea field, Soon the black smoke from the 
charcoal drifted into the cool morning sky. 
Kegs were tapped. Folding tables were 
filled with hot dogs, hamburgers, and a 
smorgasbord of snacks from Doritos to 
chocolate chip cookies. Alumni greeted 
friends from other lives, recapturing 



memories still not forgotten. 

In the Mods alarm clocks sounded. 
Troops of students, functioning on five hours 
of sleep, marched to the tailgates. Their 
eyes were bleary, but their smiles shone 
through as they celebrated another 
Saturday, another football game, another 
party with friends. A thin cloud of charcoal 
smoke hovered above them. It smelled 
great. 



■ Christopher Botelho • 




Cynthia Cady 




Top; Lots of good things to eat at a tailgate 
Right: Students toKe time from a tailgate to pose 

for a photo 
Tilted inset: "nice hair" 

210 / Tailgating 




Tailgating / 211 



212 / Study Habits 




Studying Hard? HARDLY STUDYING! 



Editor's Note: The names in this piece have 
been changed to protect the guilty from 
their parents. 

It was 3:30 A.IVI. on a Tuesday night and 
Steph and Amy had been sitting at the 
dining room table with noddling heads for 
several hours, The psychology mid-term 
was the same morning at 9:00 A.M. They 
hod had three chapters to read for the 
exam , but Steph bought the book the after- 
noon before and Amy had misplaced it 
late in September. 

"Steph, we're up 's creek! Let's just 
bag the reading and study our notes," 
whined Amy. "Ames, someone told me 
they heard the reading's more important. 
I'm gonna read Chapter 3 and skim the 
others," explained Steph. "Steph, I want to 
go to bed! I don't want to be beat for 
tomorrow night!" 

Steph and Amy were typical of many 
college students — leaving itallforthenight 
before and exhausting themselves in late 



night cramming sessions. Another common 
name for this study habit is PROCRASTINA- 
TION. 

It was 8 :45 A.M. that morning and groggy 
and unkempt students dragged them- 
selves to Campion to take the test. There 
was much last-minute preparation, "Wait, 
what does that mean again?" "Just re- 
member: Freud's really into sex." 

Bridget walked in at 8:50, looking fresh 
and relaxed. She calmly opened her text to 
check a theory, finding it easily thanks to 
ordered index cards and bold yellow high- 
lighter marks. "Bridge, who did that guy get 
his ideas from?" questioned Steph. "The 
psychologist's name is Dr. Gardner. He was 
from our first reading assignment, Steph," 
said Bridget gently. 

Bridget was typical of some college 
students — doing the work as it was 
assigned, keeping up with all the reading 
and being in bed by 12:00 the night before 
an exam. Another common name of this 



study habit was PREPAREDNESS. 

It was 9:20 A.M. and students were racing 
with their pens in the blue books, (Steph and 
Amy were moving a little slower than 
Bridget]. Doug then sauntered in with tus- 
sled hair and bloodshot eyes resulting from 
a late night at M.A.'s. He took the mid-term, 
looking thoroughly relaxed throughout it. 

It was 10:00 A.M. and groaning students 
were leaving the room. 'Doug, I can't be- 
lieve you went out lost night," complained 
Amy. "Amy, this stuff is cake; I'm not killing 
myself over it," replied Doug confidently. 

Doug was typical of some fortunate col- 
lege students — glancing over the notes 
and breezing his way through the exam. 
Another common name for this study habit 
is LUCK. 

Coincidentally, Bridgetgotan A - , Doug 
got a B, and Steph and Amy got B - 's. 



■ Marguerite Bole • 




Study Habits / 213 



Homecoming '86 

The dimly lit ballroom, the shimmer of 
party dresses, the handsomely-suited 
dates, and the elegance of the Marriott 
Hotel, Copley Place all lent themselves to 
the festivity of the 1986 Homecoming Ball 
held September 19th. 

Excitement, however, Vi/as not the only 
thing in the air that night. Homecoming '86 
was capped by the catapulting of 
cantaloupe melons taken from the fruit 
displays. The September 29 issue of The 
Heights read: "At least $11,000 worth of 
damages resulted from the Homecoming 
Dance." The damages were incurred from 
melons being dropped and thrown not only 
in the ballroom, but also from the four-story 
balcony area to the lobby below. Special 
work crews were needed to clean the rugs 
and walls of the hotel. 

The dance was attended by 1000 
people, including underclassmen, 
upperclassmen, and alumni. 



•Joanne Come • 



214 / Homecoming 




Doug Mantz 




Far left: Marguerite Bole and Perry O'Grady enjoy the music. 

Left: Junior couples take seats at the onset. 

Bottom for left; Joe Hoffman and Brian McDonald demonstrate the 

fine art of ballroom dancing. 

Bottom left: Students pose for group photo. 

Bottom: Seniors clear space on floor for pyramid. 

Inset: Senior shows oft by balancing pineapple on his head. 




Homecoming / 215 




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li*iii«i<tiitti<i|(i7'iiiAi«fVv' 



T-i—r- — — ^ 




216 / Regatta 





Regatta de Blanc 



Boston is a city of sporting tradition. The 
Boston Marathon, the Bean pot hockey 
tournament and the Head of the Charles 
Regatta are as traditionally attended as 
Thanksgiving dinner. People from the entire 
country gather to enjoy food, fun, and fes- 
tivity at these events. 

On Sunday, October 19, thousands of 
blazer and kelly green sweater clad peo- 



ple filled the streets of Harvard Square. The 
three mile stretch of grass lining the Charles 
became an extended tailgate for the day. 
The 350th anniversary of Harvard Univer- 
sity added to the excitement of the crisp fall 
day. 



•Joanne Conte • 



Regatta / 217 






■OR 



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^- 



Right: The dustbowl was 

a great place to take a 

snooze 

Bottom: study 

Opposite page: play a 

game of "hiacky sac," or 

sun yourself. 





Aris Galian 



Geoff Why 



218 / Dustbowl 




BAil 

"I thought for sure we had seen the last bit 
of decent weather," one student said to his 
friend as they approached the dustbowl. 
After shedding his too-warm wool sweater, 
the student threw down his backpack and 
placed his sweater on top of it, making a 
pillow of sorts. He proceeded to lie down, 
but stopped midway "Hey does anyone 
know what time it is?" "I just heard the bells 
ring half-past," was the reply from another 
young man, who had not even bothered to 
lift his head or open his eyes. With that the 
first student grabbed his sweater and 
backpack. "You're not going to class, are 
you? It's way too nice a day for a discus- 
sion group." "Yeah, you're right I'll get the 
notes from somebody." 

The Gasson bells told the story: one 
o'clock on the dot. "Hey, anybody going to 
their 2:00?" 



■ Chris Guzikowski • 




l^ustbtfWi / : 




220 / Halloween 



^■jhtiiLtUii 



FRIGHT 
NIGHT 



It was 6:00 p.m. on October 31st, and I was anxiously 
awaiting the arrival of my Halloween package, My 
roommates and I had all decided to be in the Miss 
America Pageant and represent a specific store. 

The telephone rang; it was my mother, She told me 
UPS had sent one of my pacl<ages to the wrong apart- 
ment, I frantically ran next door and picked up my pack- 
age, 

I carefully opened the package and to my surprise it 
was the package with the costume. There was a straw 
hat, suspenders, plaid shirt, and a kerchief. I was going 
to be Miss Kansas. 

By this time it was 7:30 and all my roommates had 
showered and were getting dressed. I hopped into the 
shower and dressed hurriedly, Paula braided my hair 
and put freckles on my cheeks. Brigid made my banner 
and we were all ready. There was a Miss Texas, Miss 
California, Miss New York, Miss New Jersey, Miss Hawaii, 
and Miss Florida. 

Kerry asked, "Steph, aren't you going to bring your pig 
Herbert? That would be a nice finishing touch." "That's a 
good idea," I replied, "but nothing can happen to Herb 
and Herb Jr. They are extremely valuable to me." 

We all left for the big bash at 39 Strathmore. We were 
welcomed at the door by a bunch of hillbillies. Once 
inside I noticed a tremendous variety of costumes. There 
were bumblebees, bunnies and birds. I also saw a large 
bag of groceries and two laundry baskets. A "Baby on 
Board" had made it past the highway and into the living 
room. Lauren then nudged me and said, "C'mon Steph, 
stop looking at all the constumes and let's get a beer." 

-^^^^^— ^^^^^^— Stephanie Sellew ^^— ^^^^^^— — ^— 





Bill Russell 



Opposite page: Costumes range from the 
"sporty" to ttie "professional." 
Ttiis page, top right: One never knows what 
celebrities wi I arrive on Halloween. 









BiirRusseir 




Halloween / 221 



Fall Here and There 



Autumn in New England is a glorious time of 
year! During the months of October and 
November, the Boston College campus 
becameapool of brilliantand spectacular 
color. Rustling through the leaves on the 
dustbov^/l brought back memories of 
endless hours spent long ago, raking, piling 
and jumping. Along v/ith looking back, 
students looked ahead to Thanksgiving 
break and spending time at home v/\\h 
family and friends. 

This was the time v\/eallgotrestless hereof 
B.C. and longed to be home or, at least, 
somewhere else. In fact, some did go 
elsewhere. The fall was a great time to plan 
road trips. The scenic New England 
highways made pleasant backdrops for 
students traveling to all those away football 



222 / Campus Color 





D.C. Color / 223 



Liz Wall 



SEAFOODS' 



224 / CLEVELAND CIRCLE . 

■■"The best seafood in Boston." IV 

BOSTON MAGAZINE & BOSTON GLOBE AWARDS 

Rk. 9, Chestnut Hill 

(Next to Chestnut Hill Cinemai 
277-7300 



• Choose from over io 
fBrielics of the CineM, 
fresheit ieafood 
Mva liable 

• Full mke-oui iervice 

• Keuil a Whole fie 
Fresh Fish Markets 

• 4 cotineitienl 
resfaurmnt locations 
open daily for 
lunch and dinner — 
U:)DAM to 10 PM 
Oyster Bar open 'til 
midnight 




"If it isn't fresh, it isn't Legal"' 



1 Exchange PI. Worcester 

(Behind The Centrum) 

792-1600 



Boiton Parli Plau Hotel, 

Park Square ( A short walk from the 

theatre district and area hotels) 

426-4444 

Sutler Office Building 

27 Columbuft Ave. 

(Next door to Boston Park Plaza Hotel! 

426-5566 

5 Cambridge Center 

Kendall Square, Cambridge 

864-3400 



Restaurants (Cont'd) ^ 

DESIREE RESTAURANT & C( §^ 

LOUNGE Spcen Nal.ck > 

DIFFERENT DRUMMER A 2. 

Concofd Depot Concord O 



Dom's 238 Highland Av Nee- 



c r 

Dunkln Donuts 138 Needham New "' 
EASY STREET 

27 Grove Wei 

please see our ijisplay ad 
Echo Bridge Restmt 1068 Chestn 




EL PHOENIX ROOM 

MEXICAN 
FOOD & DRINK 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
ORDERS TO TAKE OUT 
OPEN 11 AM - 10 PM 

1430 Commonwealth Av Bri — 



Elsie's In The Park 1 Wells Av Ne' 





^jj. Restaurant 

t{S CANTONESE and 
POLYNESIAN FOOD 




CAF 

on the Charle: 



TAKE OUT SERVICE 
ENTERTAINMENT • PARTY ROC 
COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
TWO LOCATIONS 

WAKEF 
147 LOWl 



Below: Nick's Aegean Fare serves fine 
Greek foods and salads. 



WALTHAM 
479 WINTER ST 

890-6460 








I 



iMcDonakrs 



WHERE YOU C/t 

• BIG MAC 

• CHICKEN McNUGGETS"" 

• OUR GOLDEN FRENCH FRIES 

• OR OUR EGG McMUFFIN 

• BREAKFAST SERVED 7 AM 



IN NEWTON: 197 California St. 
Ill Needham St. 
IN BRIGHTON: 1750 Soldier's Field Rd. 



10:30 AM DAILY 

527-9693 
964-9775 
783-9393 



Right Cookies Cook'n: Great muffins as 
well as cookies — great breakfast stop. 



237-9€ 

37 GROVE WEL 

MAJOR CREC. 
CARDS ACCEPTED 



--■■^•' 






7-6180 



'Slimmlwdl 



£ 



Left: Cityside: Great food and drinks con- 
veniently located on Beacon St. 




CHEFr 



CLEVELAND CIRCLE / 225 



MANDARIN-SZECHUAN-HUNAN 
CUISINE 



24 ELLIOT STREET. 



230 HARVARD STREET, 
OKLINE MASS. 02146 
731-3810 





Above: College Pizza: On Chestnut Hill Ave - 
righit by ttie bus stop! 



UVfcKLUQKirKJ HISTORIC MILL FALLS 
AT ECHO BRIDGE 

CLASSICAL MENU 

383 Elliot Street 
Newton Upper Falls 

Exit 55E off Route 128 

for reservations 

244-3080 

lill Falls Limousine Service Available 



CHKKEN • STEAKS 
'^ IASA6NA 

Ih! lOtSTER • 

VIAl CUUETS 
ZA A SPECIALTY 
^VORITE IMPORTED 
lES & LIQUORS 
M« Foe 20 (o 100 
iftiM t Sodtl FiKltaB 
lED 
^ORT I 

Opn 



CLOSED 

ALL 

MONDAYS 








ROIEILI FMIIV. Hgrs Since 1937 

13 POND ST. (Rte. 126) ASHLAND 
ON THE FRAMINCHAM-ASHLAND LINE 



fAtutmm 



Coil 



872-3665 
872-3669 



WELLESLEY INN 
ON THE SQUARE 

576 Washington SI. 
WELLESLEY, MASS. 

235-0180 




Guest Rooms 
Dining Rooms 
:3 .afayette Lounge 
-Q lanquets 20 to 150 
^ ^ionference Room 
5 Vedding Receptions 

'ackage Plans 
j:^ Intertainment 
is nacks till 11:00 p.m. 




-t 




Swdap 3 PJ*. - 9:30 PJ4. 
HoMl^s Dosed Eiceiit HoUap .^^^ 

looj. - Ttoj. 11:30 U(. - 9:30 PXX^ijf^^ 
FatSil. 11:30 AK.- 10:30 PJ4. 
LoKhMi Spedib 11:30 JLM. - IM PA 

MANDARIN ms^ 

^ tunenK haiouii - stEoitaii cusk 
TAKEOUT SERVICE 



22 Union Street. 
NEWTON CENTER 



527-3841 



r9'e/yO(mi& u/oMy 



Page 16 of the Undergraduate Catalog 
of Boston College reads, "Students are 
expected to attend class regularly, take 
tests and submit papers and othier work at 
ttie time specified by thie professor in ttie 
course syllabus." Because, as students, we 
were so preoccupied witti tailgating, 
eating, sleeping, and partying, thie fact 
ttiat we attend classes was often 
secondary. 

Thie students in A&S found time in their 
busy "unacademic" schedules to 
complete two courses each in English, 
European Historv, Philosophy, Theology, 



Natural Sciences, Social Sciences, and 
either two in Mathematics or one each in 
Fine Arts and Speech Communication and 
Theater, aside from their major 
requirements. Some chose to fill 
Philosophy/Theology requirements with 
one course. Perspectives. 

SOE students were required to fulfill the 
same requirements, except they could opt 
for either two courses in Natural Sciences or 
two in Mathematics. 

SON students also followed a rigid and 
demanding course schedule as well as 
having to fulfill the University core 



requirements, with the exception of the 
math courses. Along with their regular 
course schedule, nursing students 
engaged in clinical experience at local 
hospitals. 

SOM students followed a more structured 
schedule of requirements. Within the 
thirty-eight courses required of them is the 
core curriculum of fourteen liberal arts 
courses. The remaining twenty four courses 
included sixteen management courses, 
two liberal arts electives,and six free 
electives. 



'Joanne Conte • 




Bill RUSS€ 



Above: Francis Soo demonstrates camera-use in a photogrophiy class. 

Opposite page top: Students of Logic class listen attentively. 

Opposite page bottom: "Note-taking" — an essential part of attending classes. 



226 / Classes 




5 Galian 



Classes / 227 



WAKE UP CALL 



2:18 a.m. — Friday morning after M.A.'s: 
"Please! Just make sure I'm up. I hiave to go 
to my 8 :00 class. If I don't wake up whien thie 
alarm goes off, just scream at me." 

6:45 a.m. — "Tempted by the fruit of 
anottier, . ,WBCN Boston. "Ttieradiowason 
thie tiighiest volume. My moutti was pasty 
from the night before. I lay there, debating 
whether or not to skip my eight o'clock. My 
thoughts were interrupted when my 
roommate Michael mumbled "Turn it off," I 
moved to turn down the volume but was 
unable to do so. The top sheet of my bed 
had come untucked and was now 
wrapped around me. I finally freed myself 
and hit the snooze button — just another 
fifteen minutes was all I asked. 

7:00 a.m. — The little beeps from the 
snooze button resounded in my ears — time 
to get up. I threw the covers off me, swung 
my legs around and wrenched myself from 
the bed. My feet hitthe cold, hardfloorand I 
cringed. I grabbed my towel and headed 
toward the bathroom. 

Huddled and shivering, I walked through 
the living room and glanced out the 
window. It was pouring rain. I knew I should 
have stayed in bed. 

I flicked on the bathroom light and 
peered into the mirror. If I wasn't awake 
before, I was now! I had the worst cose of 
bed-head, black circles under my eyes, 
and a big zit on my chin! I stepped into the 
shower. The water was luke warm, not 
exactly invigorating. 

7:20 a.m. — What was I going to wear? I 
guess I could wear that sweater again (all 
my other clothes were in the laundry 
basket). 

7:30 a.m. — I was off . . . 



■ Melissa Russo • 




228 / Getting Started 




photos by Geoff Why 



Getting Started / 229 



230 / Winter Whites 






ow 



Squish . . . squish . . . squeek . . . crunch. "Oops, al- 
most lost it! Guess I'll be late again for class today." 

"Naturally, Sharon, it takes an extra fifteen minutes 
to combat the hazardous sidewalk conditions created 
by last week's three snowstorms." 

Crunch . . . crunch . . . squish . . . "We sure have 
en a lot of snow this year." 
Jeah, more than I can remember since coming 
here." 

Squish . . . squish . . . crunch , . . splat . . .sigh. "Funny 
how something that makes a campus look so pretty for 
pfewdaysandallowsforgreat ski conditions canalso 
be such a pain in the . . ." 

•Joanne Come ■ 



Winter Blues / 231 



Geoff Why 



3 

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Campus 
OIl|rtstmag 



232 / Christmas 



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The lighting of the campus Christmas tree outside of 
O'Neill, and decorative students in Mod 40B bring the 
spirit of Christmas to our campus. 




is Gallon 



Christmas / 233 



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arrivals 




FLIGHT INFORMATION 



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Departures 



Going home and getting tiome are two different tilings. 

Ttie many facets of travel can leave a student witti a 

headactie to accompany ttie excitement of going hiome. 



234 / Going Home 




Purchase Tictets 



Poeitio 




Homeward Bound 

Memories of going home: Checking air- 
fares, bus schedules. Oh, the ride board. 
Who's going where, when, where can I 
meet you? I'll pay half for gas. Realizing 
roommates were roommates; they had 
their own home to go to. Sleeping alone in 
your apartment: your final is on the last day. 
Packing your clothes, make them all fit. 
Don't forget the new sweater to show your 
brother. Did I bring my toothbrush? My keys? 
My mousse? 

Long flights, long bus rides, long car rides 
with a stranger who drives like a nut. Mental 
preparation for break. Figuring out a way 
not to study over break. Wondering if your 
kid sister will look any different. Remember- 
ing how you went home every two weeks 
during freshman year. Realizing that it's 
Thanksgiving and you haven't been home 
since September I. Realizing you just might 
be grown up, on your own. 

Turning into the driveway. Looking at the 
house. Is it my house or my parents' house? 
Seeing Mom'sface.She'ssmiling. I'm home. 



■ C H Botelho • 




Going Home / 235 



Cuffing 
Through the 

RED TAPE 



Undergraduate/Graduate Student ID'S 

University identification cards and replacements for lost/stolen 
ID'S may be obtained for a fee ($9 first card, billed to student 
account; $12 for replacements) tfirough the Boston College 
Police in Rubenstein Hall (ext. 4443), where application forms 
are completed and fees paid. Photo sessions are scheduled on 
a regular basis. 



From the 
Catalogue: 



Parking 

On-campus parking permits are issued by the Traffic and 
Parking Office in Rubenstein Hall. University traffic and parking 
regulations are published annually in July. For further details, 
contact the Traffic and Parking Department. 

Dormitory Damage: Damage to or destruction of University 
property is eonsi-iered a very serious offense. Instances of 
damage in excess of $50.00 per individual resident will be 
reviewed by the Dean of Students Office for possible judicial 
action and suspension or dismissal from University housing. 

Noise Disturbances: The improper use of sound equipment 
in/around residence halls is unacceptable, violating the rights of 
.s'udents and neighbors. Local city ordinances prohibit all noises 
which would disturb neighbors beyond 100 feet of a residence 
hall, especially between 12 midnight and 7am. 



Massachusetts state law (applicable to all attending B.C. 
regardless of home state) makes it illegal for anyone under age 
21 (with the exception of those born before June 1, 1965) to 
purchase, arrange to have purchased, transport, possess, con- 
sume or carry alcoholic beverages. 



Public Drinking $25.00 

fine, Disciplinary Probation 
Transporti ng/Possessi ng 

(Under legal age) $50.00 

fine, Housing probation 

Disorderly Conduct under the Influence 

Attendance at University alcohol education program 
plus other sanctions 

Unauthorized Keg/Beerball $150.00 

fine, two week housing suspension. Housing 

Probation 

Providing Alcohol to Minors $50.00 



Noise/Stereo Disturbance $25.00 

fine. Probation (2 semesters) 

Objects thrown from Window (which might cause injury) 

$50.00 fine, two week housing suspension 

Possession of Unauthorized Property $25.00 

fine, work project, Disciplinary Probation 

Residence Hall Damage (in excess of $50.00)Restitution, 

One Semester Housing Suspension 

Use of Fireworks $50.00 

fine. Housing Probation 

Violations of Social Gathering Policy $100.00 

fine, two week Housing Suspension, Housing Probation, 
Gathering Ban 



236 / Red Tape 



^ 





> 





mtaa. 



other Old Favorites: 



Late registration fee — Late confirmation fee — Override forms — Advisor's signature — Department stamp 
(for A&S only . . . just to confuse things, of course) — Drop/ Add — Course closed — 50-cent fee per check 
cashed — 1 keg per party — Registered parties. Registered Keg — Only 50 people per keg — No registered 
parties on football nights — No using other people's points — $25.00 fee for not bussing your tray — Manda- 
tory I.D. to enter library — Mandatory I.D. to enter Hillsides, Walsh and Edmonds — $25.00 fee for not showing 
an I.D., and the list goes on , . , 

But let's not forget our December Christmas bonus: $45.00 graduation fee! 
(Tacked on to your tuition bill, in case you didn't notice) 



Red Tape / 237 



All Night Long 



The studying all year was sporadic. Now 
it was ttie moment of truthi; thie night before 
my history final. My friends had been study- 
ing for days, but it was just the beginning 
for me. I could see my friends leaving the 
library one by one, exhausted. I began to 
feel a sense of panic, what could I do? 
Keep calm, I told myself. I started to turn the 
pages quickly with my heart still racing 
from the six after-dinner coffees. I sighed. 
"This is going to be a long night," I thought 
as Louis XIV stared back at me from a 
page on the text. 

It was approaching one a.m., closing 



time at O'Neill. I was one of the last to 
leave. When I got to my apartment I felt 
tired. It was almost two o'clock. I put coffee 
on. When it was ready, I brought the coffee 
pot and my books to the study lounge 
across the hall. After the second cup, I felt 
a surge of energy, the pages began to turn 
more and more rapidly. I was being driven 
on by the artificial stimulation of that 
steamy black water. The night seemed 
endless. 

At four o'clock, the pretty blonde girl 
went to get some sleep. "Goodnight," she 
said. Then I was alone. The room began to 



chill. My brain was now numb; my eyes dry 
and tired, became heavy. Time was now 
my enemy as the hour of reckoning came 
closer and closer. 

At 8:30 1 was just another student walking 
to class. Sitting in the classroom with heavy; 
dry mouth and wet palms, began to spill; 
out what I had crammed into my head the' 
night before. I was the last one to finish. I 
shuffled out the door and headed home; 
to sleep. 



• Christopher Hartley • 
^ Joanne Conte ^^ 





38 / All-Nighters 



.^||gjgM||^^ 





All-Nighters / 239 




DRINK, DRANK, DRUNK 



Drinking games are perhaps tine most 
popular sporting events in college. Today's 
beer drinker is outgoing and spirited. De- 
spite occasional animalistic behavior, the 
beer drinker of today has only the best of 
intentions. 

Beer was for before, during, and after the 
game — any game. Beer took the agony 
from defeat and added to the thrill of vic- 
tory. There v\/as another great thing about 
beer at BC — bars! You remember IVI.A.'s 
and the Hammond Lounge. The best thing 



about beer, though, v\/as that it could be 
used to play drinking games. 

About drinking games . . . Most of you 
have played and enjoyed them quite a bit. 
These games became the rage of Colle- 
giate America, practically wiping out the 
existence of 8 a.m. classes. Soon the rules of 
drinking games will be distributed at 
orientation to all undergraduates along 
with other essentials such as course listings, 
school regulations, and meal plans. 

Some of the more popular drinking 



games were Quarters, Chandeliers, Thum- 
per, Fuzzy Duck, "Bullshit," "Simon Says," 
and Anchorman. Some rules affiliated with 
these games were no pointing, no use of the 
words "drink," "drank," or "drunk," and no 
swearing. 

Some popular post-game activities in- 
cluded eating pizza, walking up wimpy 
roommates, stealing road signs, cranking 
obnoxious music loud enough to disturb all 
your neighbors, seeing how much noise a 
keg makes bouncing down the stairs.and 
of course, passing out. 



- Joanne Come • 



240 / Drinking Games 





Drinking Games / 241 



4 tfttp fn 




Right: Vintage clothing re-animated on 

iNewbury St. Below: Sidewalk dining in 

Cooley Square. 




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Aris Galia 



242 / City 




Andrea Shapiro 



City / 243 



The Last Stop 



Good or Crystal Transport. Once again 
they are off schedule.! am standing outside 
of More Hall patiently waiting for the bus. It's 
10:25 p.m. — NO BUS! It is snowing and it is 
really cold out. There are about ten people 
stuffed into the little hut and of course there is 
no heat. 

The Newton bus comes and goes. 
Another few minutes pass by and yet 
another Newton bus. A brave girl ventures 
out of the hut and asks the bus driver, "Ex- 
cuse me, where is the Cleveland Circle 
bus?" He responds, "Oh well, um — the bus 
before me forgot to go to the Circle and 
went to Newton instead. There is another 
one on the way." Classic. 

Though sometimes unreliable, the bus 
service at BC really was a helpful and valu- 
able service to the students. The bus system 
served the students of Cleveland Circle as 
well as Newton Campus. For the off- 
campus and freshman students, the bus 
was a convenient way of getting to school if 



you were not fortunate enough to have a car. 
That is, it was convenient as long as the buses 
ran on schedule. These same buses served as 
mass transport on weekends when, packed like 
sardines, freshmen ventured to the Circle to look 
for parties. Though the buses sometimes ran off 
schedule and the wait seemed like forever, BC 
students were lucky to have Crystal Transport at 
their service. 







244 / Buses 



Irish McWilliams 







Irish McWilliams 

Clockwise from opposite page: Student glad to tiave 
caugtit the bus; Palient bus rider; "Just made it!"; Buses are 
key on a snowy day. 



Irish McWilliams 



Buses / 245 



ffv 7ne ifO'B^s(^(<^^&v 



Any native New Englander knows that thiere is a gap 
between tine calendardate of fal I and tlie actual onset of 
cold weather. During this period students were faced with 
the monumental decision of lo wear a jacket or not to 
wear a jacket. " If they chose to do so, the next query was, 
"which one?" The time it took to answer these questions 
was unaccounted for, gaps in the day in the life of a 
student. 

For instance, what did you do with that one hour in 
between your 9 :00 and 1 1 :00 classes? That one hour may 
have been just enough time to drive home that formula, 
definition, or diagram you had had trouble memorizing 
while studying for your test the night before. Or you may 



have spent that whole hour trying to decide between 
having a fast breakfast or waiting until 12:00 to have a 
leisurely lunch. Maybe that time in between classes was 
spentgazingatyourlatestcrush across thequad, making 
your day complete. 

Whatever you chose to do with that time, those few 
hours spent in between easing, sleeping, studying, 
exercising or in class were the most free of your free time. 
You had to entertain yourself in between scheduled 
events or enjoy a few hours of sheer boredom and ti me to 
yourself. 



■ Joanne Conte • 




Geoff Why 




Geoff Why 



In Between / 247 



A 




"I heard itthrough the grapevine," "Walk 
Like an Egyptian," and "The Tootsie Roll 
Song," were annong the highlights of the 
1986 Airband contest at the Rat. Once 
ordinary college students donned cos- 
tumes and took to the stage, the Thursday 
night Rat took on a new form. 

There were screams, squeels, cheers and 
some boos when Brian McCann was 
awarded $100.00 for his rendition of the 
1970's hit, "The Tootsie Roll Song." 

"Grapevine" was also a popular hit that 
evening with two groups performing it. 
"Twist and Shout" and "Egyptian" were also 
performed with great enthusiasm. 

The semi-annual Airband contest at the 
Rat was one of the most highly anticipated 
events by the Senior class. 



-Joanne Come • 



248 / Airband 




'Heard it through the grapevine," "Wall< Lil<e 
3n Egyptian," and "Tootsie Roil son," are ail 
oerformed by senior stars as classmates look 
Dn. 



Airband / 249 




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Sue Singer 



•S KsMicjf ^'^■. ' ■ VATf^^l 



250 / After Hours 



Andy RyanI 






Aris Galian 



Clockwise form opposite page bottom: A view of ttie 
city; After hiours Eagle; Time to go tiome, finally; 
"Riley's Roast Beef: ' great place to end ttie nigtit. 




^^^ 



i>wi4, 



It was now 2 p.m. Where had the night 
gone? What should you do now? You were 
thrown out of the club you had been in all 
evening. It would have been a shame to 
waste such a phenomenal buzz in which 
you had invested so much time and money. 
It was a confusing predicament. Your 
stomach was saying/let's eat;" your body 
was screaming, "Let's sleep!" But the three 



goons that your girlfriend brought along 
were saying, "Let's party!" 

You could have gone to IHOP and 
contended with those late night waitresses. 
Those were the same waitresses that scared 
you away from Dunkin' Donuts last 
weekend. It was a polyester zoo in there. 

One of the geeks suggested going to his 
place to play some Trivial Pursuit, but you 



realized that the T stopped running hours 
ago. So it looked like Boston Cab driven by 
Attila the Hun. 

Itwas the middleofthe night. . .things got 
crazy ... the rules just did not apply 
anymore ... 



Joanne Come 



WK 




After Hours / 251 




252 / Valentine 



CAMPUS CUPIDS 



The day of cards, flowers, candy, and kisses was upon us. 
February14, Valentine's Day. Once again, you'd bought your 
boyfriend or girlfriend a card three weeks ago but have since 
broken up. Maybe you were pleasantly surprised by a card 
from a good friend, your mom, sister or a secret admirer. This 
year, the group of amours pictured on these pages chose to 
play Cupid and brought alive the excitement of Valentine's 
Day. 

Perry O'Grady, Kurt Hachkeppel, and Tom Manning 
purchased an oversized plastic heart which read "I love you 
this much," Overcome with the desire to spread love and 



happiness on the day on which the two are traditionally 
celebrated, Perry, Kurt, and Tom roamed the campus 
presenting the heart to not only theirfriends but also to perfect 
strangers and random passers-by. 

They then posed for a few shots commemorating the event! 
Later, the photos were sent out to the heart recipients as 
Valentines. When asked why they chose to play Cupid for the 
day, the three responded in unison. "We were moved by the 
spirit of Elvis." 



•JoAnn Conte • 



""^ 




heart photos donated by Perry O'Grady 



Valentine / 253 




254 / Spring Break 



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Clockwise from far left: Ways to eritertain yourself 
during a six-tiour layover; Flying high in Cancun; Lool< 
at the backdropi; Ft. Lauderdale's famous strip; 
Baking under the palms. 




Kim Walsh 




Spring Fling 



Tom knew that this was not going to be a 
good day. He awoke to the sound of a shri 1 1 
aiarm clock, then struggled out of bed only 
to find that the shower he so desperately 
needed was ice cold. Shivering, he flipped 
on the stereo only to hear that the forecast 
was calling for a high of 18 degrees. The 
thought of taking an economics exam at 9 
a.m. did little to lift his spirits. As far as he was 
concerned his course could have been 
called Tedium 101 and Studies in Monotony. 
Tom was suffering from a classic case of 
mid-winter blahs. He had to use every shred 
of his self-control to stop himself from 
crawling back into bed and pretending 
that this Monday in February did not exist. 
Fortunately, there was a light at the end of 
the tunnel. Next week was the official 
beginning of Boston College's Spring 
Break. 

The following week Tom did all he could 
to concentrate on academics, but his 
efforts were all in vain. In the middle of a 
lecture, his mind wandered to thoughts of 



palm trees, tropical drinks, and 90 degree 
temperature. "It's better in the Bahamas," 
he kept thinking, as visions of endless 
beaches and relaxation danced in his 
head. 

The above scenario is t/pical, although 
it is by no means true that every BC student 
jets off to an exotic locale during the first 
week in March. Some look forward to re- 
turning home after a two-month's ab- 
sence, while others choose to brave the 
elements and take a ski vacation. Still 
others spend a week in Appolochia help- 
ing those who are underprivileged in this 
region of the country, 

Regardless of the final destina- 
tion. Spring Break is a vaca- 
tion eagerly anticipated 
by all BC studens as a 
well deserved 
break from the ^^^,^■^'> 
pressures of 
college 
life. 



Kim Walsh 



Spring Break / 255 







pmal-(3lnt^r^st Rousts 




O'Connell House, Murray House, Hovey 
House, and Haley House are places where 
most of us found ourselves comfortable. 

O'Connell House was ttie scene for 
performances of My Mother's Fleabag, 
movies, and hosts middle March Ball 
Annually Murray House is the commuter 
hangout and is infamous for its spaghetti 



dinners. Haley House hosts coffee nights. But 
what about all those other pieces of B.C. 
real estate. Pictured on these pages are 
Connolly House, and Rahner House. 
Connolly House located on Hammond 
Street houses three students and the 
Academic Dean, Father Fahey. Together 
they plan and usher academic activities 



such as the annual BC night at the Museum 
of Fine Arts. Rahner House on College Road 
is Boston College's small business 
development center. These houses 
provided an aesthetic accentto the quality 
of each student's life. 



•JoAnne Come • 



256 / Houses 



r! WARNING !, 

I CRIMINAL VIOLATION | 

ANY PERSON UNDER 21 YEARS 

•WHO- PURCHASES ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES 

•WHO -PROCURES ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES IN ANY WAY 

•WHO- WILLFULLY MISREPRESENTS HIS OR HER AGE 

• WHO- ALTERS 
•WHO- DEFACES 

• WHO -FALSIFIES HIS OR HER IDENTIFICATION WITH INTENT 

TO PURCHASE ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES 

SHALL BE PUNISHED BY A F|NE QF S300 ^ a, 

MG L Ch. 138034A LIQUOR CONTROL ACT 
MASSACHUSETTS ALCOJ fOLIC BEVERAGES CONTROL COMMISSION ^^ 




To Have And Have Not 



Elizabeth had no problem with people. 
She was an attractive energetic freshman 
ready for college life at B.C. Yet, after a 
grueling week of studies and good deeds, 
sl^e couldn't go out to relax and meet 
people in the bars. Her eighteen years just 
weren't enough. But, Elizabeth phoned her 
older sister (a senior at B.C.) and they went 
to the Registry of Motor Vehicles — in a. 
matter of minutes three years were added 



to her face. She had attained the infamous 
false identification, yes the best plastic 
card in Boston for drinking. Her face 
appeared beside her sister's name and, 
more importantly, her age. Her friends 
scrounged up enough ID'sforall of them to 
hit the scene. Elizabeth entered another 
realm of the college experience, 
underage bar hopping. 
The fake ID seemed as important as a 



real college ID. Going to the library, the plex 
or even cashing checks all required a valid 
student ID. Bar hopping required a valid 
Mass License or a liquor permit. College 
gave us experiences to learn from, and a 
fake ID made it easierto learn about the bor 
scene. But, Elizabeth couldn't write home 
about these experiences. 



•Michael Starr • 



_ 



258 / I.D. 




I.D. / 259 




260 / Roomies 





SHARING 

THE 

CUBICALS 

Rememberthe weeks priorto the first day 
of school Freshman year? Moving away 
from home had a lot of worries and 
concerns attached to it. Heading the list of 
concerns was certainly what your 
roommate would be like. Would you get 
along? Would you be friendsfor life? Would 
he/she play Motzart while you put up the 
latest KISS poster on "your side?" Your 
roommate was probably the very first 
person you met. 

Freshman year, the two or three of you 
shared a cubical of space. How did you 
ever manage to fit all your stuff into that tiny 
room? Perhaps it was a little too close for 
comfort. Sophomore year you may have 
had seven suitemates to deal with in Walsh 
Hall. By Junior and Senior year your living 
arrangements in Hillsides, Resies or the 
Mods were a lot more comfortable. You not 
only had a bedroom, but also common 
area to share. You may still be friends, you 
may not, but at least for a time your 
roommate was the person who knew you 
better than anyone else. 



■ JoAnne Come • 



Roomies / 261 




ACADEMICS 



Bapst 
Renewed 

As the class of '87, we were the last to remember the 
days before O'Neill Library, the days when Bapst 
library was the place to study. The ornate ceilings and 
stained glass windows were backdrops for our 
lengthy study sessions. Bapst had a solemn air to it, 
more like a church than a library. 

Then, in our sophomore year, O'Neill moved in and 
changed the face of studying at B.C. Bapst closed for 
renovations and the new freshman class didn't even 
know that it existed; O'Neill was the place to be. 

Bapst remained closed for renovations but 
reopened during our junior year. Those of us who 
remembered its grandeur returned to the old buildirjg 
for quiet study time or just to admire its architecture. To 
future classes, it will be referred to as the small, old 
library, but we remember Bapst when it was the only 
library. And what a library it was. 





264 / Bapst 




Bapst / 265 



o 

O" 

■< 




266 / O'Neill 





Overtime At 

O'Neill 

Since its opening in 1984, O'Neill Library has 
played a significant role in tine lives and study 
habits of B.C. students. It is difficult, however, to 
characterize O'Neill under one title, for it meant dif- 
ferent things to different people. 

Although most used the library as a place to 
study, O'Neill also served as a prime social spot on 
campus. A planned all-nighter at O'Neill usually 
ended up as a tv/enty minute study session and a 
trip to the White Mountain with friends found at the 
third floor copy machines. 

If some found O'Neill a social center, others 
confused it with their dorm rooms. Curled up in the 
mauve lounge chairs, textbooks opened and eyes 
slowly closed. 

The Class of '87 was here to see the grand 
opening of O'Neill Library, a building that will 
always be a center of interest for the student body. 
O'Neill represented different aspects of campus life 
to different people, What you remember is up to 
you. 

—^—^^-^^—^ C. H. Botelho —^^——^^^ 



O'Neill / 267 




268 / Professors 



Professors 



From the start, something about them 
Iwas different, slightly different from our 
Ihigh school teachers. They went by the 
Ititle, professor. Some asked to be 
laddressed by their first name. Others in- 
sisted on Doctor. Doctor? The word took on 
new meaning for us as freshmen. 

They came from all parts of the country, 
all parts of the world. Their opinions carried 
the weight of their experience and proven 
intelligence and knowledge, As they 
lectured, annecdotes of past experiences 
pervaded. 

But, for the most part, they were 
approachable. More than employees, the 
professors were important parts of the 
university, characters who contributed to 



the character of the campus. Many profes- 
sors appeared as interested in our feelings 
and opinions as we were in theirs. Some 
seemed to recognize the students as the 
future of the university. Or maybe, in us, 
they recognized a similar facet of 
themselves from not-so-long ago. 

Now, as we leave campus, our old terri- 
tories, dorms, and classrooms, we may 
think back to that one special professor 
who treated us as adults, who shared with 
us vast storerooms of experience, who 
learned with us, exploring new possibilities 
on long-studied subjects. The professor 
who shared with us the greatest of gifts: 
knowledge. 




Professors / 269 



The Jesuit Tradition 



■■f:^:-.': 
-^<. 



One aspect of Boston College whicti students 
will always remember is thie Jesuit tradition, For 
those vjho were entering upon a Jesuit-influenced 
curriculum for the first time, there was a bit of 
apprehension. "There are priests living in dorms?" 
"I've heard there's been a lot of controversy over 
the history of the Society of Jesus — are they all like 
the "Grand Inquisitor?' " 

These fears were soon eased upon encountering 
a Jesuit for the first time. In the classroom students 
became less wary of these men in black; that is, if 
they were in their traditional attire. On the whole 
Jesuits proved to be wonderful teachers. Building 
upon their strong tradition of academic excel- 



lence, the Jesuits at BC were learned, caring, and, : 
in most cases, interesting, 

1987 brought a few changes in the Jesuit tradi- 
tion at Boston College. Father Hanrahan found a 
new place of employment in the Development 
Office, although he still maintained residence in i 
Edmonds. The passing of Father McGovem was a j 
tragic loss for all who knew him. And there were* 
some visiting Jesuits from other schools: Father < 
O'Malley from Georgetown and Father Deva from 
Bangalore, India. In spite of these changes, the i 
Jesuit tradition remained a vital part of the BC ex 
perience. 




Aris Galian 



270 / Jesuits 




Jesuits / 271 




This machine 

is 
temporariW 
out of service 




we apologize for the 
inconvenience 



The OCF Stali 



All photos by Liz Wall 



272 / Computers 




Computer Room 
Blues 

Down the stairs in O'Neill. Take a rightthrough the doubledoors. 
Getin line foradisk, Feel the heat of theroom.Hearthe tapping of 
computer keys and closing of the printer. Look for Kim and Joe 
and FRED. Look for FRED! Find a terminal. Pull out a chair and sit, 
Pullout your backpack, Pull out your books. Pull out your gum. Pull 
out your walkman. Put in your disk. Click the mouse twice on 
MacWrite. Open your notebook and type. 

"In Ernest Hemingway' s For Whom the Bell Tolls ..." 

Stop and backspace. Fix the apostrophe. Type some more. 

' 'The conflict arises when ..." 

Wouldn't this look nice in a different font? Geneva? Monaco? 
New York? Something more bizarre maybe? Spice up the paper; 
it's boring. Make it Venice. Venice and 14 point. Lovely. 

' 'Symbolism is particularly evident when ..." 

Look. It's FRED! It's Fred and Jane. Fred and Jane going to the 
sameterminal I Marketing project, Schmarketing project. Maybe 
I'll ask Fred for help. Maybe he'll direct me to the User Assistant. 

Finished. Timeto print itout.Twootherpeopleareprinting. Hope 
it's not their dissertations. Two minutes. There's Kathy! Three mi- 
nutes. Hey — the guy from English class! Four minutes. If they don't 
hurry, no three o'clock class for me. Seven minutes. Better try the 
laser printer. Looks nicer, anyway. 

Save it. Quit. Eject. Pick up books. Pick up gum. Pick up disk. Pick 
up Fred. Pick up Fred and Jane and their marketing project. Pick a 
place in line with them. Pick your nose. 

Time check. Five minutesuntil class. Twomorepagestogo. One 
more page. Finished. Rip it out Peel off the sides. Trot to the desk. 
Pass in the disk. Store I.D. in pocket. Pop into the hallway. Skip up 
the concrete. Out the door. The bells of Gasson. Free at last! 




Top: The CompLiter Room ... A 
second home to many students. Far 
left: Not a pretty sight to bleaty-eyed 
students. Middle: Even Mr. White is 
capable of tackling the Mac. Left: 
The beginning of many term papers. 



Computers / 273 




274 / Career Center 




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The Career 
Search 



Jobs, jobs, jobs . . . where does one begin 
to look? The Career Center. The Career 
Center serves many purposes for the Boston 
College community. Students can seek 
career counseling, resume assistance, or 
career search assistance from any one of 
the qualified full-time professional directors 
or assistant directors of the Center. The 
Center also serves as the main location for 
on-campus interviewing and recruiting. 

Besides the professional staff, there are 
three groups of paraprofessionals who 
assist students. The first group, the Career 
Assistance Program, has as its 
responsibilites administering interview and 
resume workshops as well as giving 
simulated interviews and critiquing 
resumes and cover letters. The Internship 
Staff has solicited and organized many 
different internships in a variety of fields for 
all interested students. The User Assistance 
group has as its main concern the Discover 
program which helps students in finding 
career choices through the examination of 
talents using the IBM personal computer. 

The Career Center can be used by 
students in all classes: freshmen, 
sophomores, juniors and seniors alike. It's 
never too early or too late to use the 
resources that the Center provides. 



•Rob Andrews • 



Career Center / 275 



The Clinical Experience 



The Boston College School of Nursing, 
founded on the value of humanism, is faith- 
ful to the Judeo-Christian tradition, The 
program emphasizes the dignity of all peo- 
ple, while recognizing the Jesuit values of 
scholarship and service. The BC nursing stu- 
dent uses a holistic approach in caring for 
his/her clients, incorporating knowledge 
from the empirical and rational sciences, 
as well ds drawing from the spiritual. The 
student also recognizes the physical, 
psychological, and emotional impact of 
illness on a patient. This approach is the 
most effective in promoting, maintaining 
and restoring the health of the client. 

The nursing program at BC uses theoret- 
ical and clinical experiences to facilitate 
learning. Both of these methodologies 
study health promotion on three levels: 
Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary Preven- 
tive Intervention. Clinical begins in the soph- 
omore year with Primary Preventive In- 
tervention. 

Primary nursing focuses on promoting 
and maintaining an individual's optimal 
health. The student assesses communities, 
their dominant health practices, and the 
availability of resources for these. For in- 



stance, students chose to teach methods 
of relaxation to others in the BC community 
who had identified stress as a concern in 
their daily lives. 

The study of Secondary Preventive In- 
tervention also begins in this year. This level 
of health promotion uses the nursing pro- 
cess of assessment, planning, interventions 
and evaluation in caring for acutely ill indi- 
viduals. 

Learning took place in community 
hospitals, maternity and pediatric hospitals 
as well as the other major medical centers 
of the Boston area. Nursing techniques were 
mastered while communication skills were 
enhanced. It is in the Secondary setting that 
the student becomes most fully aware of his 
or her roles as a nurse. Care plans are 
formulated as students realize the necessity 
of assessing, researching, and 
implementing plans of care specific to 
each client. 

Specific experiences in the field of 
through labor and participating in the de- 
livery process. It is believed that a mother 
who experiences care and nurturing is best 
able to express ttiese same feelings toward 
her newborn. 



Other Secondary experiences include 
the care of acutely ill children. Because it is 
recognized that illness of a child directly 
influences family functioning, the nurse who 
provides compassion and emotional sup- 
port to the family is best serving the patient's 
health needs. 

The final experience in Secondary 
nursing is thie Psychiatric rotation. The respect 
for clients' emotional pain and the time 
spent being with and listening to these 
patients are other important aspects of 
delivering humanistic care. Students came 
to an awareness that being with the patient 
in emotional pain can be just as rewarding 
as "doing for" the patient in physical pain. 

The third and final level of health promo- 
tion is Tertiary Preventive Intervention. 
Tertiary nursing is a process which assists 
the client in maintaining his or her highest 
degree of functioning. The adjustment to 
chronic illness is studied on this level. 

One of the clinical experiences in 
Tertiary is the participation in a rehabilita- 
tion setting. Students are provided with i 
opportunities of caring for a variety of f 
clients undergoing threatening changes in 
independence and body-image. Among 




Jen Reardon 



276 / Clinical 





Beth Weibel (above] and Eileen Keefe (left) enjoy 
their days as nursing students. 

these patients are young adults, victims 
of various types of accidents. Thie student 
also experiences thie care of older adults. 
Both age groups are meeting with fear, 
body disturbances, and the threat of 
dependence. Thus, nursing care during 
the rehabilitation process demands em- 
pathy as well as the capitalization of 
patient strengths for returning him or her to 
the fullest possible level of functioning. 

Thus, the BC nursing graduate is pre- 
pared to assume the many nursing roles of 
caregiver, collaborator, advocate, and 
teacher. He or she has an appreciation of 
the need to identify patient strengths and 
build on the health, not just fight in the dis- 
ease. Additionally, the BC nursing student 
has been led to develop techniques of 
communication and critical reflection. 



■ Eileen M. Keefe • 



Clinical / 277 



Right: Marykelly Canning 

and Minni Relnak on the way 

to the "real world." 

Middle: Interviewing for that 

first job. 

Right page: Another Boston 

College executive off to 

wort<. 




278 / internships 



The Real World 



- It's like a dress rehearsal. The costume is a 
suit and the script your resume. The part is 
that of a real life working professional. Once 
I started performing I became completely 
absorbed in my new role. 

I had an internship the summer before 
Senior year. It was different living in Boston 
for the summer, away from the beaches 
and high school buddies. There was a lot of 
adjustment, The first shock was that of get- 
ting up at 7:00 am every morning in The 
sunnmer. This meant that late nights would 
have to be sacrificed in order to beat as 
much of the rush hour traffic as possible. I 
was fortunate enough to have a car and not 
to have to deal with the "T" as my roommate 
did, 

IVly internship was unique because it was 
in sales. This position allowed me much 
freedom in organizing my daily schedule. 
But along with this freedom came just as 
much responsibility. Actually, my room- 
mate and I were both overv\/helmed, initial- 
ly but the duties with which we were en- 
trusted. After a week or two, we both felt 



more comfortable and challenged as 
opposed to incompetent. 

We also adapted to the role as a profes- 
sional in other ways. We really started en- 
joying ourfree time in different ways. I would 
come home and go for a quick run, if the 
heat wasnt too oppressive. By taking turns 
in the kitchen we experienced some of the 
most interesting gourmet delights. 
Weekends took on new meaning. They 
seemed so vital for revival after a challeng- 
ing work week. It was weird not to have a 
savage tan in the middle of July. 

It was about the middle of July that my 
roommate real ized that many of our friends 
were working downtown and that we 
should all meet after quitting time for a few 
drinks. We could cool off and wait for the 
traffic to subside. The place we enjoyed 
most also had a great buffet during happy 
hour. "Free" food!! It became a Wednes- 
day night ritual. It was great to play the role. 
7:00 am comes quickly and an eight hour 
day seems like an eternity, if you stay out 'til 
2 :00. 1 soon came to the understanding that 




it is possible to have fun and to not close the 

bar. 

I cant speak for everyone, but I learned 
about much more than sales that summer. 
My position afforded me the opportunity to 
literally "play the part," So much more is 
required of a professional than paper work. 
And in the same respect, there is more 
compensation for a job well done than o 
pay check. 



•Lisa l-Aiin^cltslti • 




Mike Antrobus 



Internships / 279 




"I Touch the Future." 



"You have no classes this semester? 
You're just studentteaching?"Our incredu- 
lous classmates could not understand the 
greatresponsibility that seniorsinthe School 
of Education are faced with during this 
semester. And neither could we. This chal- 
lenge required not only a change in our 
college lifestyle (no more Rat on Thursday 
nights!), but also a decision to be commit- 
ted to the young people who were placed 
under out guidance. Travelling to area 
schools as the rest of Lower Campus slept 
soundly, we separated ourselves from daily 
campus activity. 

Armed with our liberal arts background, 
we possessed the raw qualifications to be 
competent educators. This knowledge did 
not seem to be enough. Drawing on the 
coursework of three years in the School of 
Education, we explored the resources that 
had been given us by the faculty. Our 
education classes became meaningful in 
light of our student-teaching experiences. 
Another important factor in our develop- 
ment as student teacher was our prior in- 
volvement in extra-curricular activities. As 
peer advisors, senators, and Skits chairpeo- 
ple, we learned necessary leadership 
qualities. Perhiaps the most valuable asset 
to our education was the unity we found in 
the School of Education. Being part of a 
community based on human service cre- 



ated not only qualifiedteachers, but caring 
ones. 

Every experience for each student 
teacher is different. We are English- 
Secondary Education majors who have 
faced the unique problem of motivating 
students very close to our own age. When 
our juniors and seniors finally accepted the 
fact that we would not buy beer for them, 
they accepted, ard respected, us for ttie 
teachers that we are. They settled down 
and were receptive to the lessons and ac- 
tivities we planned for them. 

Content in high school English courses 
covers a broad range of literature and 
other topics. During student teaching, we 
found that we were learning novels, gram- 
mar and poetry all over again. Not only 
through research of Chaucer were we con- 
stantly hearing, butalso through the day-to- 
day experience of watching and listening 
to young people. They have a great deal to 
teach us, too. What ties all of our experi- 
ences together is our caring about the fu- 
ture. We are concerned about the minds 
who will inherit our world.ln the words of the 
late teacher Christa McAuliffe, chosen to 
bethefirstcivilianinspace,ourfeelingscan 
be described as follows: "I touch the future. I 
teach." 

Stephanie A. Raudonis and Kathleen M. Ryan ^^^ 



280 / Student Teaching 





Right page: Kim divides the class into 

teams. 

Left: Taking time to go over a student's 

paper. 

Below: Stephanie leads a discussion. 

Photos by students from Needham and Weston 
High Schools. 



Student Teaching / 281 



A sample of Australia's diverse locales 
All photos by Robert Driscoll 





282 / Junior Year Abroad 



When I first agreed to write this story on 
Junior Year Abroad, I was excited because 
it was a topic which I knew weli. What I 
subsequently have found out is that is has 
been one of the hardest chores i've had to 
do in a long time. The tough part has not 
been sitting down and writing it, but in 
attempting to convey through the written 
word the 'feeiing" that existed during that 
magic time. The unusually large number of 
students intheclassof '87 who went abroad 
know what I am talking about. 

Although the experiences each of us en- 
countered are as diverse as the lands we 
traveled, there existed some basic similar- 
ities in all of our adventures. A record num- 
ber of us realized it was time to seek our 
educational experiences outside the 
boundaries of Commonwealth and 
Beacon, The risk of giving up a semester or 
two at Chestnut Hill proved to be an invalu- 
able investment. In the BC Undergraduate 
Catalog, JYA is described as a "non- 
degree special program designed to en- 
able students to become fluent in a foreign 
language and better understand a foreign 
culture." Ifyou think about it, this goal could 
also be achieved in a classroom in Lyons. 



Learning Overseas 

Forus who went, it was so much more than 
this. It was a time of independence and 
interdependence, With prejudice put 
aside, we travelled with anyone going our 
way, resulting in strong bonds between 
people who had met just a short time be- 
fore. Happiness pervaded our time 
abroad, whether it was in a train station, 
classroom, or small store trying to get your 
message across to the old lady who could 
barely understand our lousy translation. 

We were proud to be American, Frequently 
questioned, we hod to be experts on every- 
ttiing ttie US had to offer. Whether we liked it or 
rot we were forced to be experts on US foreign 
policy during thie Libyan Crisis, The particular 
nichie of thie worid we ctx)se to visit became 
our classroom. We were brailling thie worid 
first-hiard; an experience we had not urder- 
gcHie since childhood. We were both teachers 
and students,our characters being shaped 
and restraped like Playdough, 

It seems ironic that with all the things we 
learned, all the people we met and all the 
places we saw, we learned more about 
ourselves than anything else. When our 
planes touched down, we couldn't believe 
it was over. We knew we were changed 



and for the better. We had a new, more 
optimistic attitude. 

What began as a casual conversation 
between acquaintances on a warm spring 
day sophomore year ended as the trip of a 
lifetime for two great friends. From the vil- 
lages of Fiji to the Australian outback, from 
the fjords of New Zealand to the remote 
Cook Islands — that was our dream and we 
got a chance to live it. For those of us who 
went away, this is the time to pick up that 
photo album, blow the dust off the cover 
and relive that dream. 

To Mom and Dad, thanks for having the 
openmindedness to let us all go on our little 
adventures. For this we will be eternally 
grateful. 



• Riiherl Driscoll ■ 




Junior Year Abroad / i 8 




284 / Exams 



A Final Chronicle 



Freshman Year: December 15th and the freshmen 
are starting their first round of coliege finals. The dorms 
are quieter than usuai, but the study iounges are 
brightly lit all night long. There is a certain nervous ten- 
sion in the year because no one knows what to ex- 
pect. Everyone just wants to go home, utilizing those 
plane tickets that they have been faithfully gazing at 
every day since Thanksgiving. Several people pull 
their first all-nighters; others begin smoking cigarettes 
during this strenuous time. Inevitably, someone In the 
dorm sleeps through a final and following the initial 
wave of terror caused by this monumental slip-up, the 
freshman discovers that professors are people after 
all. The sleeplessness, the coffee, the junk food and 
the strain all combine to produce two thousand walk- 
ing zombies, most accustomed to this trying schedule 
and the creeping-up of the holidays. Relief, it seems, 
is never in sight, and one cannot help but question 
the worth of undergoing such a trial seven more times. 

Sophomore Year: December 15th and the sopho- 
mores are starting their third round of finals. Feeling a 
little weathered, the sophomores spend less time 
drinking coffee and procrastinating In the lounge and 
more time procrastinating in the library. This semester, 
it is a little more nerve-wracking. For one thing, if you 
hear one more word about "the big accounting 
final," you are going to bomb Fulton, Secondly, you 
realize that your courses are more difficult than fresh- 



man year, and you have got to study a little herder. 
The air in the Eagles' Nest is almost solemn, and it is 
hard to believe that this is the same place in which 
you spent six hours a day just one week ago. Just one 
week ago too, you had never seen morning sun shine 
through your window. Now as you enter your third 9 
a.m. exam, you breathe a sigh of relief for dropping 
that course with a final on the 21 st. Relief is somewhere 
In sight and you look forward to going home. 

Junior Year: December 15th and the juniors are start- 
ing their fifth round of finals. No sweat; everyone has 
those two or three hard finals and then the others that 
are not going to be especially taxing. After studying 
for the first final, you decide to reward yourself with a 
visit to Mary Ann's — after ail, your next final is not for 
three whole days. Studying progresses pretty smoothly; 
it Is especially helpful that you bought books which 
have already been highlighted. It is also helpful that 
you are not in a dorm environment — somehow the 
frenzy of first semester finals escapes students who 
retreat off-campus or behind apartment doors. There 
is another noticeable difference In finals this year — 
you concentrate on everything but finals. At the library 
or in your room, you think of many things: "Wow! I'm a 
junlorl" or "It's kind of depressing to leave my friends 
for a whole month, " or "Now I'm paying for that course 
i dropped sophomore year," Your mind spins with in- 
formation during this week. Relief Is both in sight and 



at hand, you make time to meet someone for coffee, 
you slip in some Christmas shopping before depart- 
ing, you sell some books bock and use ttie money to 
go skiing one day. It's not really o hardship after oil. 

Senior Year: December 15th and ttie seniors ore get- 
ting ready for their seventh roorK) of finals Several 
seniors have forgotten that tt^ey even hove exams 
and ponder how they'll squeeze ttiem in between 
wortt, internships, and Christmas parties. Seniors ra- 
tionalize: "If I got a B on ttie midterm and I get a D on 
the final, can I still go to Great Scott's tonight?" It 
seems like years ago that seniors pulled an all- 
nighter, much less become visibly upset about finals. 
Sure, there is that one difficult final and that final 
paper that is, needless to say. already one week late. 
You spend your time in the library figuring out what 
day you are meeting your friends in Florida, or when 
you are going to come back, or how you are going to 
make money over Christmas, or how you ore getting 
home for Christmas, for that matter. Relief, it seems, is 
not to be had. for while you are glad that the semes- 
ter's worl< is now officially over, you are suddenly 
reminded that you will never undergo first semester 
finals again. 



'Andrcu Flanu^un ■ 




Exams / 285 




BOSTON COLLEGE 

CHESTNUT HILL. MASSACHUSETTS 02167 



OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 



My Dear Graduates of the Class of 1987: 

On the large canvas that is Boston College, your four undergraduate 
years saw painted an artful landscape of new academic buildings, the 
exciting colors of Bowl victories in Dallas and Tampa and the new profile 
of academic life that has been transformed by the opening doors of O'Neill 
and Bapst Libraries. 

In the more intimate recesses of mind and heart, you and your 
classmates grew just as dramatically, as you shared friendships, new ideas 
and insight, new responsibilities and new loyalties. The landscape of the 
College, for all of its new color and new skyline, remains unmistakably the 
campus that fascinated you on your first September day in 1983. As the 
class graduates, I am sure that your parents recognize in your more mature 
face and more reasoned views, thoughts and hopes and loyalties that framed 
your identity since childhood. 

You have my gratitude for the imagination and thoughtfulness and 
insight that you have made a part of the spirit of Boston College, and I 
trust that in your years as graduates, friendships among you will remain 
strong and the College's ideals of understanding and faith and of service 
to those about you will remain constant loyalties. 

Sincerely, 



I 



I 



J. Donald Monan, S.J. 



Donald Monan, 
President 



286 / Fr. Monan 




Fr. Monan / 287 




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302 / Images 




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Images / 305 




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Steve Fitzpatrick 



310 / Images 




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312 / Images 




Geoff Why 



Images / 313 




314 / Images 




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0OSTON CQLLEG!^ 
1987 



SENIORS 



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Seniors / 319 




**. 





Seniors / 321 




322 / Seniors 




Seniors / 323 



JACQUELINE M. 
AARON 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



GALE M. ABBASS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



POLA G. ABBONIZIO 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



TERRI A. ABELY 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



CATHY L. ABRAMS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




GREGORY J. ACETO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



JULIE ACHESON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



JORGE E. ACOSTA FRANCIS F. ADAMS, III 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



JAMES W. ADAMS 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




CHRISTINE ADLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



JOSEPH T. 
AFFLITTO, JR. 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



LISA E. AGUILO 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



KATHLEEN ANN 
AHEARN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics Romance 

Language 



BRIAN D. AHERN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Economics 




KAREN E. AHERNE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



DAWN M. AIELLO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



MARY E. ALBERGHENE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 

Political Science 



JOANN E. ALEX 

School of Education 

B.A. Elementary Education 

English Middle School 



KEVIN R. ALEXANDER 

School of Management 
B.S. General NIgmt. 



324 / Seniors 



ANA M. ALONSO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



JILL L. ALPER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



JO-ANN ALVAREZ MARJORIE M. ALVAREZ 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



.\i Is ii; Sciences 
B.A. I'olitical Science 



JOHN J. ALVORD 

Ails ii: Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




ANNE M. AMARI 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



TRACIE E. AMBROSE 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



GREGORY M. 
AMOROSO 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



RONALD G. 
ANDERSON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



STEPHEN P. 
ANDERSON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




TRACEY E. ANDREJKO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Computer Science 



ROBERT J. ANDREWS 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing Finance 



SARAH M. ANDREWS 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



JOSEPH ANDRIOLA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy Political Science 



LAURA ANTHONY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




STEPHEN ANTIGNANI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KONSTANTINOS 
ANTONIOU 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Economics 



JOHN V. APRUZZESE 

Arts &c Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



MICHAEL A. ABRISI 

Arts 8c Sciences 
B.A. History 



RENEE D. 
ARCHAMBAULT 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 

Finance 



Seniors / 325 



STEVEN F. ARCIERI 

School ol Maiiaycmc'iU 
B.S. Marketing 



PATRICK B. ARD 

Scliool ol ManaKcmciU 
B.S. Marketing 



DIANE M. ARDUINO MICHAEL C. ARENA ' JAMES J. ARGUIN 



School ol Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



School ol Managcnicm 

B.S. Accounting 

Finance 



Arts it Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




RONALD J. ARIGO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 
Communications 



LISA C. ARRASIN 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



MARGUERITE 
ASCENCIO 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



GREGORY S. ASCIOLLA 

Arts Sc Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

English 



LAURA H. ASHE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




MARTIN T. ASHLEY 

Arts Sc Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

Philosophy 



PAUL H. ASWAD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



FLORENCE J. ATHEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



THOMAS B. ATKINS 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



CHRISTINE M. 
AUGELLO 

.■\rts &; Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




ANA MARIA AVILA 

School of MaiiagcinciU 
B.S. Finance 



LUTOF M. AWDEH 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Marketing 



JOYCE C. AYLWARD 

School of Management 
B.A. Marketing 



MICHAEL AYLWARD 

School ol Management 
B.S. Management 



LISA J. AYR 

.■\rts Jc Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



326 / Seniors 




BETHANN BABIEC 

School of Mariagcniciil 
B.S. Accounting 




CLAIRETTE J. 
BACALLAO 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 









There was a definite process by which one made people into friends, and it involved 
talking to them and listening for hours at a time. — Rebecca West 




GLORIA M. BACO 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



ANA M. BAEZA 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 

Romance Language 



JULIANNE BAGGETT 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



MARY B. BAILEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



PETER F. BAKER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 





SUSAN BALDWIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



KATHLEEN E. BALL 

Arts Be Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



ROSA F. BALLESTER MEGHAN L. BALSOM 

School of Management Arts X: Sciences 

B.S. Computer Science B.A. Economics 



KAREN L. BARBER 

.Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



Seniors / 327 



CATHERINE 
BARDASCINO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



DAVID J. BARDWIL 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Computer Science 



JAMES V. BARILARO 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.S. Mathematics 



LISA E. BARKER BELINDA A. BARLOON 



School oi Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



School ol Management 
B.S. Economics 




LAURA S. BARLOW 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



JUDITH A. BARNET 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



MARGERY C. BAROUS BRENDA M. BARRETT 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Psychology 

English 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Pohtical Science 



JOHN J. BARRETT 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




But what are we but our bad habits? They make us feel alive, don't they? 

— Marilyn Harris 



rr» 



KAREN C. BARRETT 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




STEPHANIE M. 
BARRETT 

.Arts it Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



328 / Seniors 



ANDREW E. BARRON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



ANTHONY A. 
BARRUETA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



BARBARA L. BARRY EDWARD P. BARRY 



.Arts cV- S( iciKcs 
B.A. Kconomics 



Arts t^- Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



JENNIFER L. BASCETTA 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



THERESA S. BATISTA 

School of Management 
B.S. Human Resources Mgmnt. 



JULIE BATTISTA 

School of Education 

B.A. Elementary Education 

Human Development 



NANCY L. BATTLES 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 

Human Resources Mgmnt. 




'iM4^ 



KEVIN M. BARRY 

Sch(jtjl ul .Mana^cjjicnl 
B.S. Accouniing 




MARIBETH B. 
BAUTISTA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 
Political Science 




RAMON E. BAUZA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



JOHN R. BAYLISS 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



KELLY A. BEAGAN 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



KAREN A. BEATON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



BRIAN J. BEAUDETTE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 




SUSAN L. BEDFORD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



CYNTHIA J. BEELER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Physics 



JENNIFER M. BEGO CHRISTINE A. BELLIAN JAMES J. BELLIVEAU 



School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance MarkeUng 



School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



Seniors / 329 



ANTHONY J. 
BENEDETTI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



TIMOTHY M. BENESKI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



JENNIFER A. BENSON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



PETER C. BENTZ 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



ALAN J. BERARDI 

Arts ik Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

,Sociolog\ 




TRAGI A. BERATIS 

School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



RONALD F. 
BERESTKA, JR. 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



NORMAN R. 
BERETTA, JR. 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



TARA S. BERGEN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



DIANE E. BERGER 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 

Philosophy 




JACQUELINE M. 
BERNARD 

School ol Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



LISA M. BERNIER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



JAMES BERRY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ROBERT M. BERRY 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 

Finance 



JEAN C. BERTINO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




INA F. BERTOLINO 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



PAULA A. BERWICK JONATHAN F. BESSE VIRGINIA BEVELOCK TIMOTHY M. BEVER 



.Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



.•\ns &; Sciences 

B.A. Computer Science 

Mathematics 



lIiooI ol Managcmcnl 
B.S. Accounting 



School of Management 
B.S. .\ccounting 



330 / Seniors 



ANDREA T. BIANCHI KATHLEEN M. BIBBO 

School of Management Ails & Stitiicis 



B.S. Marketing 



B.A. Psychology 




JULIA E. BILLO 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



LESLIE A. BILODEAU 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




GINA M. BIRMINGHAM 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



STEPHEN D. 
BIRMINGHAM 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Unclassified 




MICHAEL R. 
BISSONNETTE 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



ELIZABETH BLACK 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

Economics 



RACHELENA M. 
BIFULCO 

Arts & .Siieiui-s 

B.A. C()m|)iitcr Science 

M:illKiii;iii(s 



JO-ANN E. BIGWOOD 

.\l Is Jv.- S( KlICCS 

IV.\. I'olilK al Science 

!'.( olinnii( s 






itrr 



JOHN L. BILLERA 

.\i Is Jv: .Smnies 
B.A. History 




The supreme happiness of life is the conviction that we are 
loved; loved for ourselves, or rather, loved in spite of our- 



selves. 



Victor Hugo 



Seniors / 331 




We are tomorrow s past. 

— Mary Webb 




KELLEY J. BLACK 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




ELIZABETH A. BLADEK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




MICHELLE C. BLAIS 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



BONNIE M. 
BLANCHETTE 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



ROBERT J. BLANEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



LISA BLANK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



LORI S. BLANK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Political Science 




tViE«.ry.8u«--ii:iSi'i¥->^t2.^ 



CATHLEEN A. BLASI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




JACQUELINE A. BLAU 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



HELEN M. BLIER 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Theology 

Sociology 



JONATHAN K. BLOOD MARGARET H. BLOOD 

School of Management .\rts &; Sciences 



B.S. Marketmg 



B.A. English 



332 / Seniors 



JOSEPH P. BOGDAN 


JOHN M. BOIARDI 


LISA A. BOISVERT 


MARY LEE BOLAN 


JOANNE BOLANOS 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Sduiol of Management 


Alls Sc S( iciK.cs 


School c>i Management 
B.S. .Marketing 


B.S. Biology 


B.A. Psychology 


B.S. Marketing 


B.A. Psychology 










Finance 




GREGORY P. BOLEN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



CHRISTINE J. 
BOMBARA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



MARY B. BORG 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



NANCY A. BORGATTI 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



BRIAN S. BORTNICK 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




JOHN STEVEN BOSACK MARGARET M. BOSCO 

Arts & Sciences School of Management 

B.A. Communications B.S. Finance 

Economics Economics 



CHRISTOPHER H. 
BOTELHO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 

Philosophy 



LUIS G. 
BOTERO-LONDONO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



DOMENICA BOTTARI 

.Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Romance 

Language 




NANCY L. BOUCHARD 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



CATHERINE S. 
BOUCHER 

School of Education 

B.A. Middle School 

Moderate Special Needs 



RONALD J. BOUDREAU 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.S. Psychology 



KEVIN J. BOULAY 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



CYNTHIA A. BOUTHOT 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



Seniors / 333 



THOMAS J. BOWLER FREDERICK C. BOYD 



Arts i<: Siiciufs 
U.A. ('oiiuiHinii.ilioiis 



.S<lu)()l 1)1 Mjiiagcmciit 
B.S. FiiiaiKc 



JEAN BOYLE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Kcononiics 



SUSAN E. BRADLEY 

S( JkjoI <)i Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



ELLEN M. BRADY 

Arts S: .Sciences 
B.A. Frjiitical Science 




KATHLEEN M. BRADY 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MARY M. BRADY 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 

Finance 



JAMES BRATTOLI 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



WILLIAM BREEN 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. English 

Philosophy 



ELIZABETH CASHMAN 
BRENNAN 

.Arts ic Sciences 
B..\. Computer Science 




JOHN O. BRENNAN 



Arts & Science 



'S 



B.A. English 
Philosophy 



PETER BRENNAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



KELLY L. BREWER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



JOHN BRIGANDE 

Arts ic Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



DAWN M. BROOKS 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




KAREN E. BROOKS CARLA M. BROWN 



School of Niu'sing 
B.S. Ninsing 



.■\rts &: Sciences 
B.A. History 



CHRISTOPHER J. 
BROWN 

School ol Management 

B.S. .Accounting 

Physics 



ERIK S. BROWN 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



MATTHEW BROWN 

.\rts &: Sciences 
B.A. English 



334 / Seniors 




LEONARD J. 
BRUSKIEWITZ 

School ol Maiiiigtriiciil 

B.S. I'xonoiiiirs 

Finantc 



MARGARET E. 
BRUTON 

Alls & Sciciucrs 
B.A. Eiiglisli 



ELIZABETH A. BRYANT LAURIE A. BUCK 



.\rl.s X: S( iciK cs 
14. A. l■:nKli^ll 



Alls N. Si iciKi-s 

li.A. I'oliiiial Science 

Sim ioloj^y 



STEPHEN E. BUCK 

Si lioul i>l M.iM,i;;<iiici)l 
lis. liiiaiice 




VIRGINIA B. 
BUCKINGHAM 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



THOMAS M. BUCKLEY TIMOTHY P. BUCKLEY CAROLYN P. BUERKLE CATHERINE K. BUNI 

Arts Sc Sciences School of Management Arts & Sciences ArLs & Sciences 



B.A. Political Science 
Independent 



B.S. Finance 



B.A. English 



B.A. Romance 
Language 




CATHLEEN E. 
BURGESS 

School of Management 

B.S. Computer Science 

Finance 




EDWARD J. BURKE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 
Communications 




Creative minds have always been known to survive any kind of bad training. 

— Anna Freud 



Seniors / 335 



KATHLEEN BURKE 


LAUREL A. BURKE 


EILEEN M. BURKHART 


BRIAN P. BURNS 


•CHRISTINE M. BURNS 


Alls ii; Scii-iucs 
B.A. C>)mmunications 


Arls &: Sciences 
B.A. Economics 


School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Economics 


Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

English 


.\rts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 




It is a mark of intelligence, no matter what you are doing, to 
have a good time doing it. — B.W. Cochran 




CORINNE E. BURNS 

Arts 8c Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



JACQUELINE I. BURNS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




KATHLEEN M. BURNS 

Arts Sc Sciences 

B.A. Psychology' 

Sociology 



MICHAEL J. BURNS 

.•\rts & Sciences 
B.S. Mathematics 




LAURENCE E. 
BUSCHING 

.•Vrts &: Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



GERARD A. BUTLER 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



336 / Seniors 







KATHRYN L. BYRNE NANCY T. BYRNE ANTHONY D. CABEZON RAMON A. CACERES 



School ol Maiiajjcnicnl 
B.S. Marketing 



StluMjl ol Managcniciil 
B.S. Markcliiig 



Arts &: Scifiucs 
B.A. Economics 



.S( hool of Managcrijcnl 
B.S. linanci- 



ELIZABETH A. 
CAFFREY 

ArLs & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




ROBERTO R. CALDERA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



GUSTAVE P. 
CALDERON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Geology 



STEPHEN J. CALEFATI 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



GINA M. CALISE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



PAUL F. CALITRI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




CATHERINE M. 
CALLAGHAN 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



CHRISTINA M. 
CALLAHAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



JANINE E. CALLAHAN ROBERT M. CALLANAN CRISTOFORO CAMA 

School of Education School of Management Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Accounting B.S. Biology 



B.A. MiddleSchool 




ANA SOFIA CAMARA ROBERT J. CAMERON 

Arts & Sciences School of Management 



B.A. Communications 



B.S. Finance 



AGOSTINHO A. 
CAMPANARIO 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 

Psychology 



MARIE M. CAMPBELL MARJORIE CAMPBELL 

Arts & Sciences School of Nursing 

B.A. History B.S. Nursing 



Seniors / 337 



ROBERT B. 
CAMPBELL, II 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 

RoiiiaiKc language 



THOMAS J. CAMPBELL 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

English 



PAULA CANNA 

.'\ns Sc Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



MARYKELLY CANNING 

Stiinol ot Management 
B.S. Finance 



JOHN C. 
CANNISTRACI 

.\rts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




DAWN M. CAPELLI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



MARIA P. 
CAPOBIANCO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



CHRISTINE C. CAPONE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



PAUL M. 
CARRACCIOLO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



PETER CARBONE 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




JEFFREY J. CARD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



CONNIE M. CARDOZE 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

Psychology 



CHARLES F. CAREW 

School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



MARGARET A. CAREY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



SUSAN M. CARILLI 

School ot Management 

B.S. .\ccounting 

Computer Science 




MARY E. CARNEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



SEAN M. CARNEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



SUSAN M. CAROLAN CHERYL E. CAROZZA 



Arts &: Sciences 
B.S. Economics 



School ol Management 

B.S. Accounting 

Computer Science 



NICHOLAS A. 
CARPINELLI 

School ot Management 
B.S. Finance 



338 / Seniors 




EILEEN CARR 

School of ManagcmciU 
B.S. Business Atliii. 




■ 'M 



RICHARD J. CARR 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




We all live with the objective of being happy; our lives are all different and yet the 
same. — Anne Frank 




LUIS A. CARREIRO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



CLARE F. CARROLL 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Romance 

Language 



SUSAN CARROLL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



COLLEEN M. CARTY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



GINA CARUSO 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




JEFFREY P. CASALE 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



RICHARD P. 
CASALETTO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Economics 



MICHELLE J. 
CASAVANT 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



GERARDO J. CASAZZA ELLEN CASEY 



Arts &: Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



.Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. English 



Seniors / 339 



JONNA SULLIVAN MICHAEL J. M. CASEY SEAN J. CASHMAN 



CASEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Social Science 



Alls X: Sciences 
B.A. Politcal Science 



School ol Managemcnl 
B.S. Accounting 



PETER P 
CASPARRIELLO 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



MEGAN M. CASSIDY 

.Arts X; Sciences 
B.S. Economics 




TARA L. CASSIDY MICHAEL R. CASTANO GINA L. CASTELLUCCI CYNTHIA A. CASTLE JOHN C. CATAUDELLA 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences Arts Be Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics B.A. Mathematics B.A. Sociology B.A. History B.S. Biolog)' 




/ was a fantastic student until I was ten, and then my mind began to wander. 

— Grace Palcij 




MELLISSA L. CATENZA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




TINA M. CATINELLA 

School ot Management 
B.S. Accounting 



340 / Seniors 



CHRISTOPHER 
CAVALIER 


PATRICK J. 
CAVANAGH 


KEVIN M. 
CAVANAUGH 


TIMOTHY J. 
CEGLARSKI 


KAREN M. CENTOLA 


Arts & Scientes 
B.A. Political Science 


Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Political Science 


Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psycholog)' 


School ol Mariiif^tincnl 
B.S. Markcliiig 


li.S. Nursing 




Mi^d 





CATHY E. CESARIO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



PETER A. CHABOT 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



KEVIN CHAGNON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



LILLY CHAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



STEPHEN G. 
CHARKOUDIAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 





PAOLA CHARLESON AIMEE M. CHARLTON MAURA E. CHARLTON 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications B.A. English B.S. Biology 

Communications 



STEPHANIE B. 
CHAVOYA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



ROBERT T. 
CHECKOSKY, JR. 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.S. Mathematics 

Economics 




PAMELA M. CHEN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



OTILIA CHEUNG 

School of Management 

B.S. Economics 

Finance 



ELLEN Y. CHIN 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



TODD P. CHISHOLM WILLIAM N. CHISHOLM 

Arts &: Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communicatons B.A. Theater 



Seniors / 341 



SUSAN M. CHMIEL 

Alls X; Si iciHi-.s 
B.A. PsyiliolofT) 



KAREN J. 
CHMIELEWSKI 

School ol Management 
B.S. Finance 



DANA C. CHMIL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



MICHAEL CHOY 

■Arts & .Sciences 
B.A. Knglisli 



JACQUELINE A. 
CHRIST 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




LEOPOLDO H. 
CHUMACEIRO 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Computer Science 




JULIE A. CHURBUCK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



DOREEN M. 
CHUTORANSKY 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.S. Psychology 



JOANN L. 
CIAFFAGLIONE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 

Economics 



JOHN HETHERMAN 
CIANCIOLO 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. History 




SUSAN CIANCIULLI 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



THOMAS M. CIBOTTI ANTHONY J. CICHELLO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

Philosophy 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance Economics 



STEPHEN 
CIEMBRONIEWICZ 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. English 



MARY M. CIMPL 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 
Communications 




JOSEPH P. CINNEY 

School of Management 
B.S. F'inance 



DANIEL J. CLARE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



LISA R. CLARK 

Arts c'v: Sciences 
B..\. Conmiunications 



SUSAN R. CLARK 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Computer Science 



ALISON E. CLASBY 

.\rts Ji; Sciences 

B.A. English 
Communications 



342 / Seniors 



C 



MADELEINE A. 
CLAUSHUIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




It i 

r 

y ■ 



L 



KELLY A CLIFFORD 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. 0>nununicali(>ns 

Enj^lisli 



LISA M. CLIFFORD MICHAEL B. CLOHISY JOHN A. CLOPECK 

\i Is S: S< iencis Sdiool ol .\Ian;inenicnl 

li./\. I'svdiolngy B.S. Cicncral Management 



S( liool (il KdiKalioii 
U..'\. Ilinnaii lJcvclo|)rnciit 




KRISTIN M. CLOUGH 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 

English 



PHILIP F. COCCO 

School of Management 
B.S. Quantitative Analysis 




ARTHUR D. 
COCKERHAM 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 
Quantitative Analysis 



ELAINE A. COCLIN 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 




JAMES M. COFFEY 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. History 

Philosophy 



ANN P. COGAVIN 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




The successful man is the one who has lived well, laughed 
often, and loved a great deal. — A J. Stanley 



Seniors / 343 




i 



It is the friends you can call up at four a.m. loho matter. 

— Marlene Dietrich 




JACK COGHLAN 

Alls X; SLicnccs 
B.S. Cicolog)' 




HERBERT S. 
COGLIANO 

School of Management 

B.S. Computer Science 

Marketing 




MARTHA E. COHEN 


SANDRA T. COHEN 


MICHAEL A. 


HELEN COLLIER 


DOUGLAS E. COLWELL 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


COLAVECCHIO 


Arts &: Sciences 


.Arts iL- Sciences 


B.A. Communications 


B.A. Psychology 


Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 


B.A. Economics 


B.A. Economics 




ELIZABETH M. 
COMSTOCK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



JOHN J. CONCANNON 

.Arts it Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

Philosophy 



THOMAS F. 
CONCANNON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 
Computer Science 



JEROME J. CONDON PAMELA J. CONDON 



.Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. Psychology 

Economics 



.Arts Ji; Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



344 / Seniors 



ALICIA CONILL 

Alts 8c Sciences 
B.A. Comimiiii(;iiioiis 



MIMI R. CONKLIN KATHLEEN M. CONLON 



Alls & Sciciues 

B.A. Romantc 

Language 



Alls X: Siiemes 

B.A. Political Science 

Kcononiics 



KATHLEEN M. 
CONNELL 

School ol Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



STEPHEN M. 
CONNERNEY 

Alls & Sciences 
B.A. History 




JEANNE G. CONNOLLY 

School of Education 

B.A. Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 



VIRGINIA A. 
CONNORS 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



DAVID I. CONRAD PATRICIA A. CONROY 

Arts & Sciences School of Nursing 

B.A. Economics B.S. Nursing 



JOHN P. CONRY 

School ol Management 
B.S. Accounting 




JAMES J. CONSIDINE 

School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



HENRY G. CONSIGLI 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



JAMIE G. CONTE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Psychology 



JANICE CONTE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



TIMOTHY COOK 

Arts &: Sciences 
M. E. D. 




JOHN P. COOLEY 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 

Finance 



SUSAN M. COONEY SUZANNE L. COONEY 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



School of Education 
B.A. Earlv Childhood 



GEORGE N. 
COOPER, III 

Arts &; Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



PHILIP M. COOPER 

.■\rts & Sciences 
B..A. Mathematics 
Computer Science 



Seniors / 345 



JOHN M. CORCORAN 

Sdionl (il Miiiiagc-iiKMU 
15. S. AccDUiilinn 



PATRICIA ANNE 
CORCORAN 

Stiiool ol Ediitation 
B.A. Klemcntarv Kducaton 



RICHARD J. 
CORCORAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



STEPHEN T. 
CORCORAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



JANE M. CORDARO 

Sciioo! o( Kdutaiioi) 
B.A. Kk'iiicntarv Kflutatioii 




KAREN CORKERY 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



BRUCE J. CORNELIUS MARY L. CORNETTA 

School of Management Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Finance B.A. Psychology 



MONICA CORRADO VINCENT J. COSCO. Ill 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



.Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

Philosophy 




MARYBETH M. 
COSGROVE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KELLI G. COSTA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



MARIA G. COSTA KRISTINE A. COSTELLO JAMES J. COSTER 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



.Arts i*c Sciences 
B.A. Endish 




JAMES M. COTE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



GEORGE COUFOS 

School ol Management 
B.S. Marketing 



STEPHEN H. 
COURTNEY 

."Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



MARIANNE A. 
COURVILLE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Art History 



CHARLES S. COX. JR. 

School ol Management 
B.S. Kinance- Economics 



346 / Seniors 



BETH ANNE F. CRANE MARGARET A CREHAN FIONA C. CRERAR 



Arts & Si iciUL's 
B.A. luonoiiiiis 



Si llOdl (ll M.MI.lUC-lllClll 

B.S. liiiaiitc 



St liool ol Ntii siriy^ 
B.S. Nuisiiin 



LUIS L. CRESPO DONALD P. CRESTON 

S(liniilcj| M.[ri.ii;(iii(nl .\i is ^- Siiciii c-s 

15. S. M.irkciiuyi B.A. History 

Economics 








PATRICIA J. 
CRISAFULLI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



CARYN L. CRONIN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 

Economics 



MARY ELIZABETH 
CRONIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Psychology 



JEAN M. CRITCHLEY NANCY E. CROGHAN CATHLEEN CROKE ELIZABETH L. CROKE 



School of Education 

B.A. Elementary Education 

English 



School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



Arts &■ Sciences 
B.A. Biology/Psychologv 



.\rts K: .Sciences 
B..\. Political Science 






Too much of a good thing can he wonderful. 

— Mae West 



Seniors / 347 



STEPHANIE A CRONIN MICHAEL P. CROOKS AILEEN K. CROWLEY 



Si hnol cil MaiKim'TTiiMiI 
B.S. (iDmiHiici SciciKf 



Si liiiol ol M.in.inc-rncril 
H.S. MarkcliiiK 



S( liool <)i I'^diK <ilioii 
B.A. Eleiiiciuarv KdiKallo 




GRETCHEN L. 
CROWLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



SUSAN E. CROWLEY 

Si hiiiil ol Niii sjiiK 
B.S. Nursing 




KARA S. CUMMINGS 

.■\rts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



MARGARET ANN 
CUMMINGS 

-Alls t^ Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

English 




PATRICIA A. 
CUMMINGS 

School of Xmsing 
B.S. Nursing 



JUSTINE CUNNINGHAM 

Ans ^- Sciences 
B.A. English 




DIANA M. CUOMO DOUGLAS CURLEY 

.\ns i<: Siioiues School ol Management 

B..\. Economics B.S. .Accounting 



348 / Seniors 



CAROLINE J. CURAN JANET M. CURRAN 



Alls it Stic-iiics 
B.A. litoiioniits 



Alls t*l: Stk-iHc-s 
li.A. I'dliliial Science 



JOHN S. CURRAN 

Alls & S( iciiLL-s 
li.A. Kiij^lish 



PATRICK J. CURRAN SHAWN M. CURREN 



,\l Is \; .Si iciK IS 
li.A. Kcoiioiiiics 



.\i Is \: Si K-IK rs 
li.S. I'oliiical Scicntc 




DENNIS M. CURTIN MAUREEN E. CURTIN 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Mathematics B.A. English 



DAWN B. CURTIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



KARA B. CURTIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



KIMBERLEY R. 
CUSHING 

Arts Ji: Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 





JUDITH M. CZAJA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Physics 



MARY L. CZYMBOR 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



LINDA J. CZYRCA 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MARIA L. D'ACHILLE 

School ot Management 
B.S. Marketing 



RENEE D'AMBROSIA 

School ot Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 




DENISE DABROWSKI MARIA L. DACHILLE 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



STEPHANIE L. 
DADAIAN 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 

Psychology 



SUSAN G. DADIO 

School of Education 
B.A. Early Childhood 



STEPHEN DAGOSTINO 

School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



Seniors / 349 



PAUL F. DAIGNEAULT WILLIAM C. DAILEY MICHAEL P. DALTON ROBERTA M. DALUZ ' MARYCLARE DALY 



Alts & S( iciKcs 
B.A. Kiiglisli 
Theater Arts 



Arts X; Stieiiies 

B.A. Psyehology 

English 

Economics 



•Arts K; Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



S( hdol ol .Managenieiil 
B.S. Finance 



St hool ol \in siii^ 
B.S. Nursing 




FRANCIS T. DANEHY 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



LAURA M. DANIS 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



STEVEN DANTONIO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



CHRISTINE A. 
DARSNEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



LILA M. DASILVA 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




JUNE C. DAUDELIN JENNIFER A. DAVID VALERIE A. DAVILA 



School ol Management 
B.S. Finance 



School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



NANCY J. DAVIS 

School of Management 

B.S. ."Accounting 

Finance 



TANYA R. DAVIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biolog) 




DANIEL R. DAWSON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



STEPHEN 
DE BETHUNE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



ALINA M. DE LASIERRA NANCY DE MARCO 

School of Management Arts &: Sciences 



B.S. Marketing 



B.S. Biology 



ROBERT DEROSA 

.Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. English 



350 / Seniors 



ERICA DEADY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



MARK V. DEANGELIS 

Arts &; Sciences 
li.A. Economics 



PAUL F. DEBASSIO 

S( liocil ol M.m.igi iiicnl 
U.S. Markelinj,' 



ELIZABETH A. 
DECONTO 

Arts & .Sciences 
B.A. Knj,Hish 

( loriiniuiiK , It ions 



JOSEPH A. DEFEO 

-A Ms X: Si icM( cs 

B.A. l'hilo.sophv 

Thcolofp' 




MICHAEL R. 
DEGENNARO 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



THERESA M. 
DEGIROLAMO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



MAUREEN B. DEIGNAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



GINA N. DEIULIS 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Romance 

Language 

Economics 



ANNE M. DEL VECCHIO 

School ol Education 
B.A. Human Development 




CARMINA M. DELA 
CRUZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KATHLEEN M. 
DELANEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



L. MATTHEW DELANEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



MARY E. DELANEY JEFFREY M. DELPORTO 

Arts Sc Sciences School of Management 



B.A. Theology 
Theater Arts 



B.S. Accounting 




PAUL A. DELUCA JENNIFER C. DELUCIA GAIL A. DEMARCO NANCY L. DEMARCO JOHN J. DEMASSI 

Arts & Sciences School of Education Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences .Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. Economics B.A. Early Childhood B.A. Communications B.S. Biology B.S. Phvsics 



Seniors / 351 



ROBIN E. DEMERS 

Sl llliol 1)1 M.llKimilRMi 

U.S. M.irkcliiiK 



INGRID DEMOOR JOYCE M. DEMUCCI MARILEE DENELLE ^ SUSAN J. DENKER 



Alls & Sciences 
B.A. Art History 



Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Psychology 



School of Managenieni 
B.S. Marketing 



School of Kducation 

B.A. Middle School 

English 




PATRICIA J. 
DENTREMONT 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. English 



DIANE L. DEOSSIE KATHERINE A. DEFIES MONIQUE D. 

School of Management Arts & Sciences DERAGON 

Comp. Info. Proc. B.A. English Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 



CHRISTINE DESAVINO 

Arts &; Sciences 
B.A. English 




KATHLEEN M. 
DESMOND 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



TIMOTHY C. DESMOND 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics/Philosophy 



YVETT 


RENEE M. 


MARY ROXANNE 


DESROSIERS- 


DESROSIERS 


DESTEFANO 


ALPHONSE 


.Arts &: Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


B.S. Biology 


B..A. .-Kccoimting 


B.A. Sociology 


Psychoiog)' 






THOMAS E. DEVANEY CAROL A. DEVIRGILIO MICHAEL T? DEVLIN 



.Arts i<; Sciences 
B.A. Commnnicallniis 



.■\rls S; Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



THOMAS PAUL 
DEWINTER 

.■\rts & Sciences 
B..^. Economics 



CRISTINA M. DIAZ 

School ol M.inagemcnt 
B.A. Markeiinir 



352 / Seniors 




MARCO N. DIAZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




JAIME L. DICKERSON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




Life is what we make it, uhvaijs has been, always will he. 

— Grandma Moses 




HAGOP H. DIDIZIAN LEONARD C. DIETERLE DAVID P. DIFILIPPO 

School of Management Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Marketing & 
Organizational Studies 



B.A. Communications 



B.A. Communications 



ROBERT J. DIGISI MARY ANN DILBERGER 

School of Management School of Management 



B.S. Accounting 



B.S. Accounting 




DOUGLAS S. DILLON 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Biology 

Economics 



GERARD A. DILLON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 
Philosophy 



JENNIFER M. DILLON 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

English 



SIMON T. DILLON 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.S. Biochemistrv 



BIANCA DINAPOLI 

.\rts & Sciences 
B.A. Social Sciences 



Seniors / 353 




KRISHNA M. DING JOHN W. DINNEEN ANTHONY S. DINOTA LOUIS G. DISABATINO : LISA M. DITOMASO 



Arts iir Siii-iucs 

B.S. Biocliiinistiy 

I'hilosopliy 



S( hool of Miitiiif;ciiu-nl 
B.S. Accomuinj^ 



.Silidol (il Maiuif^cincril 
B.S. linaiKC 



Arts & Sciciitcs 

B.A. Coniimiiiications 

Political Science 



.\ns S; .Sciences 
B.A. Mallienialics 
Computer Science 




TRACEY M. DIXON 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



MARIA CRISTINA 
DOCAL 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



SARAH E. 
DOERHOEFER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



JULIA A. DOHERTY KENNETH P. DOHERTY 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Computer Science B.A. Economics 





EDWARD J. DOLAN 

School oi Management 

B.S. Economics 

Finance 




JOHN C. DOLAN 

.Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



354 / Seniors 



MATTHEW J. DOLAN THOMAS H. DOLAN 



Alls & Sciences 
B.A. History 



S( hool ol Maiia^L-inc-iiI 
B.S. Kiiiaiuc 



SHAWN A. 
DOMBROWSKI 

Alls K: Sc ic-iitcs 
U.S. Biology 
Psychology 



KAREN A. DONAHUE KELLY M. DONAHUE 



,\ils iy: S( ic'iiic's 
U.S. .Mailicmatics 



MARY E. DONAHUE DAVID A. DONATELLI PATRICIA A. DONLIN PAUL J. DONNELLY 

Arts & Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Management 



B.A. Political Science 



B.S. Marketmg 
Finance 



B.S. Marketmg 
Finance 



B.S. Accounting 
Computer Science 




.\ris & Sciences 
B.A. Political .Stietice 




JEFFREY M. 
DONOFRIO 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




^akA\ 



JAMES A. DONOVAN JANET S. DONOVAN JEANNE A. DONOVAN JOSEPH A. DONOVAN LAURA E. DONOVAN 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English B.A. Economics B.A. English B.A. Political Science B.A. Philosophy 




SUSAN M. DONOVAN CAROLYN L. DOOLEY MARIE E. DOOLEY LORRAINE J. DORAN MAUREEN M. DORAN 

School of Management Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences School of Management Arts & Sciences 



B.S. Marketmg 



B.A. Political Science 



B.A. Political Science 



B.S. Marketmg 



B.A. Psychology 



Seniors / 355 



I 



/[< ■ 1 i 






SANDHYA DOSS 

Alls S: Sciences 
B.S. Malhcmalics 



MICHELLE P. 
DOUCETTE 

Arts it Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



THERESE A. 
DOUCETTE 

School ol Ediicalioii 
B.A. Middle School 



ELIZABETH M. DOUGAL 

Alls ii: Sciences 
B.A. History 



JOSEPH J. DOW 

School ol Management 
B.S. Finance 




KERRY A. DOWLING MARK J. DOWLING 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English B.S. Biology 

Theater Arts 



MERYS DOWNER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



CHRISTINE V. DOWNS 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



TIMOTHY DOYCE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




EILEEN M. DOYLE JEREMIAH T. DOYLE KENNETH M. DOYLE TIMOTHY S. DOYLE MICHAEL P. DRISCOLL 

School of Management School of Management School of Management Arts & Sciences .Arts ^- Sciences 

B.S. Marketing B.S. Marketmg B.S. Accounting B.A. Psychology 

Finance 



B..\. Political Science 




ROBERT E. DRISCOLL MARK R. DRUFFNER EDWARD S. DRYDEN KATHLEEN DUCIE 



School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 

Finance 



.■\ris i: S( iences 
B.S. Biology 



.\rts &: Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



School ol Manaj^emcnt 
B.S. Btisiness .\dm. 



TARA J. DUCOTT 

.■\rts ic Sciences 
B..\. Psychology 



356 / Seniors 



AARON K. DUERKSEN KRISTIN E. DUFF 

Alls & SciciKCS ScIkioI ol M.iri:[ncirii'iil 

B.A. Conimunicatioiis B.S. CompiUci Siiciuc 



MYLES DUFFEY 

Alls i^- S( K-ii( cs 
li.A. Ilisioiv 



EILEEN DUFFY PETER CHARLES DUIC 



Alls ,V S( iciKCS 

li.A. So(i;il Sciences 



Alls t<- S( K-IK cs 

B.S. Ecunomics 




VERONICA DULONG DEBRA A. DUNCAN 

School of Management Arts &; Sciences 

B.S. Accounting B.S. Computer Science 
Computer Science 



P 




MARIA DUNN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



ROBERT J. DUNN 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




SAMANTHA K. DUNNE KRISTA L. DURANT 

Arts & Sciences School of Nursing 



B.A. History 



B.S. Nursing 








^te 






As voe are, so we do; and as we do, so is done to us; we are the 
builders of our fortunes. — Ralph Waldo Emerson 



Seniors / 357 




There is no pleasure in having nothing to do; the fun is in having lots to do and not 
doing it. — Mary W. Little 



DANIEL G. DURKIN 

Alls X: S( iciiccs 
K.A. Kconornics 




DIANNE M. DURSO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 







MICHELLE DUSSEAULT KRISHNA M. DUVALL 

Alls ^- Sciences Sclnool of Nursing 

B.A. Philosophy B.S. Nursing 



SHEILA M. EALY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Enghsh 
Communications 



ELIZABETH J. EASTON 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



WILLIAM EBBEN 

.Arts & Sciences 
V>.\. Communications 




CHRISTOPHER J. EGAN CAROLYN ELVIDGE KRISTINA S. EMANUEL PATRICK J. EMERTON JEAN L. EMERY 



School o( Manageineni 
U.S. Accounting 



S( liddl ol Manageinenl 
B.S. Marketing 



School ol Manageincni 
B.S. Markeliiig 



.\r[s i^- SiRMue^ 
B.A. English 



School of Education 
B..\. Severe Spec. Needs 



358 / Seniors 




^^^R 







THOMAS M. EMERY 

School ol Miiiuigcmciu 

B.S. Computer Science 

Markcling 



EDDIRLAND R. 

ENZMANN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



TINA S. ENG 

School ol Management 

B.S. Finance 

Marketing 



RICHARD G. 
ENGELMAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



STEPHEN J. ENGLERT 

Alls i*V- S( icIK (-s 

B.A, ( j>n)niiiiii{ ations 



MARYELLEN 
ENRIQUEZ 

Aru & Sciences 
B.A. Engli.sh 




CHRISTOPHER J. 
ERICKSON 

Arts 8c Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



ROBERT ERNST 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 

Finance 



MICHELLE E. ERWIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



MAGALI G. ESCALANTE 

.School of .Nursing 
B.S. .Nursing 




MICHAEL A. 
ESPOSITO 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



/^\ 



RICHARD W. ETTINGER 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Computer Science 



ERIN EVANS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



JULI-ANNE K. 
EVANGELISTA 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



LISA T. EVANGELISTA 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



CATHERINE B. EVANS 

School ol Management 
B.S. Business .Adin. 




MARK E. EVANS 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Economics 



WILLIAM T. EVERS 

School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



SHARON M. 
FABISZEWSKI 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



DARIN E. FABRIZIO 

School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



Seniors / 359 



I 




EDMOND T. FAHEY 


JAMES J. FAMA 


EVA M. FANG 


ROSEMARIE C. FARINA 


: JOHN A. FARNA 


Ajls I't; SciciKvs 
B.A. Political Science 


S( h(n)i ()l Managi'iiifiU 
B.S. Markciin^ 


School ol Maiiaj^cniciu 
B.S. Marketing 


Ails S; .Sticiucs 
B.A. Psychology 


.•\n.s & SciciRcs 
B.A. Economics 




JEFFREY FARMER 


ROBERT D. FATOVIC 


WENDY FAY 


LAURA FEAHENY 


DEBORAH M. FEDELE 


Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 

English 


School of Management 
B.S. Finance 


Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 


Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Mathematics 


Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 
Communications 




LISA A. FEDELE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



ANDREW W. FEE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



ALAN F. FEENEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



EDWARD C. FELDMAN 

Arts S; Sciences 
B.A. Phlosophv 



KAREN P. FELIX 

Arts &r Sciences 
B.A. English 




PATRICIA A. FENNELL 

,\rts it Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



EDOUARD J. 
FERNANDEZ 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



KATHLEEN M. FERRIS STEPHEN E. FERRUCCI CHRISTNE M. FETTIG 



.\rls &.• Sciences 
B..^. Conmuinicalions 



.\ns X: Sciences 
B..\. Economics 



School of Nursint; 
B.S. Nursing 



360 / Seniors 




ti 



SUZANNE R. PICKS LUCIANO L. FIDALGO 



Alls i<.' Siicnccs 

B.A. Clonipulcr Science 

Malhciiuitics 



Siliool ()l MaiKiyciiu'iil 
B.S. Marketing 



JACQUELINE A. 
FIDANZA 

Alls & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



MAUREEN L. FIELD 

Alls .V S( ICIK CS 

ii.A. i'oliiital Sciente 



DAVID E. FIELDS 

S( liool of M;iM;ii:<'inent 
B.S. Marketing 




KIMBERLY A. 
FINNEGAN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

Philosophy 



KAREN L. FINNERAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




JOSEPH D. FISICHELLI 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




JULIE C. FISSINGER 

Arts Sc Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

Philosophy 



PHILIP J. 
FINOCCHIARO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



EDWARD F. FISCHER 

-Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

Philosophy 




ALAN C. FISH 

.Arls iL- .Sciences 
B..\. Economics 





Everything else you grow out of, hut you never recover from childhood. 

— Beryl Bainb ridge 



Seniors / 361 



BRENDAN G. 
FITZGERALD 

Alls & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



DAVID FITZGERALD JULIE A. FITZGERALD KEVIN J. FITZGERALD 



Aj IS I'v; Sciciuis 
B.A. English 



School ol Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




/ shall be telling this with a sigh somewhere ages and ages 
hence: Two roads diverged in a wood, and I — / took the one 
less traveled by, and that has made all the difference. 

— Robert Frost 



.Alls X: S( iciK cs 
B.A. .Maihcmatits 



MARY ELLEN 
FITZGERALD 

.-\rl.s & .Sciences 
B..-\. Sociology 




PAUL C. FITZGERALD SHEILA M. FITZGERALD 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




SUSAN FITZGERALD MAURA M. FITZGIBBON 



School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



School ol Education 
B..\. Human Development 




JENNIFER L. 
FITZPATRICK 

Arts i- Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



THOMAS J. 
FITZPATRICK 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



362 / Seniors 



KATHRYN R. FIX 

ArLs Sc Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



MARY K. FLAHERTY 

Alls &: Sciences 
B.A. Ecoiioniics 



TIMOTHY RICHARD 
FLAHERTY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



ANDREA M. 
FLANAGAN 

Arts it .Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



PAULA M. FLANAGAN 

Alls Sc St ICIK (_-S 

B.S. Biology 




rm 



MARYELLEN 
FLANNERY 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



KAREN M. FLEMING 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



MATTHEW W. 
FLETCHER 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 
Communications 



REBECCA M. FLINT 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



KATHLEEN E. FLOOD 

.■\ns & Sciences 
B..A. Communications 




MARGARET E. FLOOD 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. English 



JOHN F. FLYNN 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KATHLEEN M. FLYNN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 

Philosophy 



ROBERT J. FLYNN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 

Economics 



THOMAS FLYNN 

School of Management 
B.S. Business Adm. 



^K^ 




DAVID C. FOGARTY GERARD D. FOGARTY CATHERINE M. FOLEY MICHAEL R. FOLEY KAREN E. FOLLANSBEE 

School of Management Arts Sc Sciences Arts & Sciences School of Management Arts &: Sciences 

B.S. Computer Science B.S. Physics B.A. English B.S. Finance B.A. Sociology 

Marketing 



Seniors / 363 



LAURIE A. FONTAINE 

Alls il; Siiciucs 
B.A. Sociology 



JOHN M. FORD 

Arl.s & SticiKcs 
B.A. Folitital Science 



DEBORAH M. 
FORHAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



LAUREN E. FORLENZA 

.School ol Management 

B.S. Marketing 

PsychoUjgi,' 



' DONNA-MARIE 
FOSTER 

School of Education 
B.A. Elcm. — Special Education 




JAMES M. FOX 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 
Philosophy 



CARA J. FRANCESCONI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



MARK S. 
FRANCESCONI 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



CYNTHIA J. FRARY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biochemistry 



MARY E. ERASER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




WENDY FREDRICKS 

School ol Management 

B.S. Finance 

Marketing 



PAUL E. 
FREUDENBURG 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Economics 



ROBIN K. FRIEDMAN 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



NANCY N. FROST 

School of Education 

B..\. Human Development 

English 



TENNY H. FROST 

School of Educalioii 
B.A. Earlv Childhood 



SUSAN A. FRIGERIO 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



GERARD FROST 

School of Management 
B.S. Economics 





k^M 



GREGORY F. 
FROTON, JR. 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



ANDREW T. FURLONG 

Scliool ol M<iiiau;enient 

B.S. Marketnig 

Finance 



STEPHEN T. 
GAGLIARDI 

.Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



364 / Seniors 




WILLIAM A. GAGLIARDI 

School of Managcmcnl 
B.S. Finance 




DONNA GAGNE 

School of Educations 
B.A. Educations 




The greatest pleasure in life is doing what people say you cannot do. 




KRISHNA M. 
GALEHOUSE 

School of Education 
B.A. Elem. — Special Education 



ARISTEO GALIAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MOIRA M. GALLAGHER 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Computer Science 

Mathematics 



PETER M. 
GALLAGHER 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 

Economics 



LISA M. GALLIGAN 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.S. Psychology 




ANN C. GALLO 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



LINDA J. GALLUZZO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



JOHN B. GALVIN. JR. MAURA P. GALVIN 

Arts & Sciences School of Management 

B.A. Communications B.S. Marketmg 



REGINA M. 
GAMALINDA 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



Seniors / 365 



DANIEL GAMEZ 

Arts L<: Sdt'iRCS 
B.A. r,c()in>ini( s 



COLLEEN A. GARCIA DEBORAH A. GARCIA INES S. GARCIA 



Alls ii; Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

Romance Language 



; MICHAEL R. GARCIA 

/\rts & Sciences 
B.A. (^omunications 




KIMBERLIE S. 
GARDNER 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Marlceting 



MICHAEL R. GARNEAU 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Studio Art 



MOLLY GASNICK KELLY A GAUDETTE 



School of Management 
B.S. Business 



School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



ANNE M. GAVIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




ANDREA L. GDOWSKI 

School of Niu'sing 
B.S. Nursing 



366 / Seniors 



MONICA A. GEARY ANDREA J. GELSOMINI 

School ol Nursin(^ Siliool of EdutaUoii 



B.S. Nursiii 



g 



•K.A. Kk'incntary Kducation 
Moderate Special Needs 



NICHOLAS J. 
GENDRON 

Alts & Sciences 

B.A. C>)niputcr Science 

Malheinalic s 



RONALD R. GENDRON 

Ai IS ii: Si ic-uc cs 
B.A. tiiglish 



MARGARET M. 
GEOGHEGAN 

Arts & .Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




SHARON M. GEORGE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



YVONNE M. GERALD 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 

Human Resources Mgmnt. 



MELINA B. GEROSA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



KATHERINE M. 
GERSTLE 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



JUDITH M. GERVAIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 




THOMAS A. 
GIACCHETTO 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



SUEELLEN 
GIACOMELLI 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



PETER J. GIAMBANCO 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



STEPHANIE 
GIANNAROS 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



GEORGE SCOTT 
GIBSON 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




DONALD A. GIGNAC 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



GEORGE J. GILBOY 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



CHERYL A. GILLESPIE 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



DALE S. GILLETTE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



MARY K. GILLIGAN 

Arts S; Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



Seniors / 367 



i 




^M^ '^ ^B 







AGNES 1. GILLIN 

Arts X: Siiciitcs 
B.A. Communications 



SANDRA M. GILLON 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



MARY C. GILPIN TERRI A. GIORDANO : CHARLES B. GIPSON 



School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



School of Managemciil 
B.S. Accounting 



.■\rl.s & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




PHILIPPE GIRON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 
Communications 



MAUREEN L. GLENNON ROBIN L. GLOVINSKY 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Biology B.A. Psychology 



KIMBERLY B. 
GOLDBERG 

Arts &; Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



DONELLE M. GOMES 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociolog) 





RONALD J. GOMILLA FELIZ F. MIGUEL A. GONZALEZ ROBERTO E. JOSEPH J. GOODWIN 

Arts & Sciences GONZALES-RUBIO Arts & Sciences GONZALEZ Arts it Sciences 

B.S. Biology Arts & Sciences BS- Biology Arts &: Sciences B.S. Biology 

B.A. F.conomics B.A. Political Science 




TIMOTHY J. GOODWIN 

Arts S; Sciences 
B.A. History 



NANCY M. GOON 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



RICHARD GORACH TREVOR L. GORDON MICHAEL J. GORMAN 

School ol Management 
B.S. Accounting 



School ol Maiiaa;enient 
B.S. MarkctMig 



.Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



368 / Seniors 




^ 




SHEILA M. GORMAN PATRICIA A. GORMLEY 



School ol Management 

B.S. Computer Science 

Marketing 



School ol Management 
B.S. Finance 





JOANNE P. GRANDE 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



KRISTIN A. GRANT 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 




MICHAEL P. GRANT 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



SARAH E. GRANT 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




ROBERT P. GRAZIANO 

School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



ELIZABETH J. 
GREAVES 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JACQUELINE S. 
GRADISAR 

Arts it Sciences 

B.S. Philosophy 

Biology 



WILLIAM D. GRAFTON ROBERT M. GRAHAM 



.'\i Is K: .ScieiKes 
B.A. I'sythology 



.•\ri.s & SticMies 

B.A. Political Science 

Economics 




Seniors / 369 




/ believe in getting into hot water. I think it keeps you clean. 

— G.K. Chesterton 




TERESA J. GRECCO 

Sc liool of Kducalion 

15. A. Matlic'tnalics 
Secondary Education 




CHRISTINE J. GRECO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Computer Science 

Mathematics 




SUSAN M. GRECO 

Scliool of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



KATHLEEN M. 
GREELEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



TIMOTHY J. GREELEY ELIZABETH A. GREENE 

Arts & Sciences ."^rts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science B.A. Economics 



BEATRICE M. 
GREMLICH 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 




MAUREEN E. GREWE CAROLYN M. GRIECO LAUREN M. GRIFFIN STEPHEN P. GRIFFIN 



School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Economics 



School ol Education 

B.A. Human Development 

Early Childhood 



Scliool of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 

Finance 



School ol Management 
B.S. Finance 



KAY GRIFFITH 

.\rts &: Sciences 
B..\. English 



370 / Seniors 



JOHN S. GRIMM 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



THOMAS F. GRIZZETTI 

School o( MaiiagcmciU 
B.S. Accounting 



BETSY L. GRODY 

Arls Sc Si iciu (■> 
li.A. Economics 



DENISE A. GROSS DAMIAN B. GROZIER 



Ai ts X; St i(.-ii( cs 
K.A. Kcoiioniics 



Alls \: St win cs 
B.A. Comniunicaiions 




LAURA M. GUDELIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



LOUIS M. GUERINI 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 
Communications 



LAWRENCE GUERRA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Psychology 



ANN T. GUGGER 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



BARBARA J. 
GUILFOYLE 

School ol Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 





PAUL K. GUINEY 

School of Management 

B.S. Computer Science 

Finance 



DENISE M. GUNN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 
Computer Science 



CECILIA M. GUTIERREZ 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



MICHELLE A. 
GUZOWSKI 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



DL\NE M. GWON 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 




HYUNG-JOON HA 

School of Management 
B.S. General Mgmt. 



DAVID F. HAABESTAD 

School of Management 

B.S. Computer Science 

Accounting 



LORETTA A. 
HABOSIAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



MARIE C. HACHEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



JOHN L. HACKETT 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



Seniors / 371 



TIMOTHY HACKETT MARK H. HADDAD BEVERLY A. HAGNER PATIENCE D. HAILEY REBECCA S. HAINES 



School ol M.iri.im'int'Mt 
B.S. liiuiiicc 



Alls ii: Si ii-iiics 

li.A. I'sytliology 

lnclc|H-iHlcnt 



Alls & SticiKcs 
B.S. Bio( heniislry 



S( hool <»1 KdiKalion 
B.A. Iluiiian Dcvcl<jpniciu 



Si liciol ol .Manani-iiK-MI 
B.S. .Markcling 




JAMES D. HALL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



JENNIFER A. HALLETT SHEILA A. HALLIDAY 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications B.A. English 



CORNELIUS W. 
HALLISEY 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



ANNE M. HAMILTON 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. English 




CHRISTY A. HAMILTON DEBORAH S. HAMIN JAMES L. HANCOCK JEAN K. HANKINSON 

School ol Management School of Management Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 



B.S. Marketing 



B.S. Finance 



B.A. Political Science 



B.A. Communications 



ALAN T. HANLEY 

School ol Management 
B.S. Finance 




JACQUELINE R. 
HANNON 

Arts X: Sciences 
B..\. Mathematics 



JULIE A. HANNON TARA A. HANRAHAN WELLS S. HANSEN DANIELLE HANSON 



School ol Education 
B.A. Elemenlarv Education 



School ol Education 
B.A. Comnuinications 
Human Development 



.■\rts &: Sciences 
B.A. Classics 



.\rls i<; Sciences 
B.A. English 



372 / Seniors 



ROBERTA L. HARBACK 

Alts Sc Scicrucs 
li.A. Political Science 



CHRISTOPHER C. 
HARDING 

School ol Maiiaf^cmciU 
B.S. Marketing 



BRADFORD T. HARDY WAYNE S. HARDY 

■Alls c<: S( iciKcs SiliDiiliil M.iii.i^ciNciii 

B.A. I'oliiical S( ience U.S. Acccjunting 



MARK J. HARE 

S( Imol ol Manaj^eriitril 
U.S. Financc 




KATHLEEN M. 
HARKINS 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



RONALD E. HARLOW 

School of Education 
B. A. Human Development 



KEVIN L. HARMON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



JEANNE M. HARNEY 

Arts 8c Sciences 
B.A. English 



SCOTT HARNEY 

.4rls & Sciences 
B.A. English 




DONALD H. HARNOIS 

School of Management 
B.A. Accounting 




JAMES P. 
HARRINGTON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




If you are ever in doubt as to whether or not you should kiss a pretty girl, always give 
her the benefit of the doubt. — Thomas Carlyle 



Seniors / 373 



I 




JOHN J. HARRINGTON ANNE C. HARRIS 



Arts & Sticntcs 

li.A. Psychology 

Sociology 



Arts & Sciciucs 
B.A. Knglish 



ELIZABETH D. HART GERREANNE HARTE KAREN L. HARTSELL 



Alls & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



/\ns ct Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



School ol Managenieiu 
B.S. Computer .Science 





JENNIFER L. HASER 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JAMES B. HASSEL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



til 




LISA M. HATCH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Computer Science 



JOHN E. HATEM 

.Arts JL- Sciences 
B..\. Mathematics 
Computer Science 




LAURA M. HATTON 

.\ns &: Sciences 
B..-\. tiommiMiicalions 



KRISTI T. 
HAUBENREICH 

School of Management 
B.S. .Accounting 



374 / Seniors 





KEITH T. HAUGHEY 

Arts & Sticnccs 
B.A. Economics 



HOLLY J. HAVENS RAYMOND HAWKINS 



Alls Sc St icMtcs 
B.A. Political Science 



Ar Is X: S( icru rs 
li.A. (lompiilc'i S( iciuc 



JAMES p. HAYES 

Sc liDol ijI M.ili.inciniill 
B.S. Actounling 



MICHAEL F. HAYES 

Alls ii: Sticims 
B.A. Economioi 





SUSAN E. HAYNES SCOTT L. HAYWARD 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



DENEEN HAYWOOD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



THOMAS G. HEALEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



TIMOTHY G. HEALEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Geology 




ANN P. HEALY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 

Political Science 



KATHLEEN M. HEALY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



MARY JANE HEALY 

School of Education 
B.A. Early Childhood 



SUSAN E. HEALY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



ELLEN M. HEAVEY 

.Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. Communications 

Political Science 




MARIA VICTORIA C. 
HEBRON 

School of Management 

B.S. General Mgmt. 

Marketing 



JEAN M. HEFFERNAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



MARGARET D. 
HEFFERNAN 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



PATRICIA A. 
HEFFERNAN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 

Philosophy 



LESLIE A. HEIN 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



Seniors / 375 



^mm 



JILL A. HENDRZAK SEAN M. HENNESSEY 



Alls !<: Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



Alls X; Sciences 
B.A. English 



KIMBERLY A. 
HEPWORTH 

Alls & Sciences 

B.A. Romance 

Language 



ELLEN M. HERLIHY CRAIG S. HERNANDIS 



Alls &: Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



.Scliool of .Mana^eiiienl 

B.S. .Accouming 

Marketing 




CAROL A. HESSON 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



MARY E. HESTER 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



SHAWN P. HESTER 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 
Communications 



EMILY J. HIGGINS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Psychology 



JAMES F. HIGGINS, JR. 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




JEANNE M. HIGGINS 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



LISA M. HIGGINS 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 

Economics 



MARYBETH HIGGINS STEPHEN A. HILDRETH DEAN J. HIPOLITO 

Arts & Sciences Arts &: Sciences School of Nursing 

B.A. Psychology B.A. English B.S. Nursing 




MARYBETH HIRSCH 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



BETH A. HIRSH 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. English 



STEPHEN W. HOBDAY 

.\rts &: Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



JOHN M. 
HODGENS, JR. 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



JUSTINE A. HOFFMAN 

.\rts &: Sciences 
B..\. Communications 



376 / Seniors 








W. DREW HOFFMAN JAMES B. HOGAN 

Arts & Sciences School ol MaiiajfciiR-iil 

B.A. Conuminicalions B.S. Kiiiamc 



JAMES J. HOGAN 

Alls it Sciciucs 
B.A. Kconoiiiic s 



MICHAEL J. HOGAN RACHAEL J. HOGAN 



.'\rls & S( iciucs 
B.A. CoMiimiiilcations 



■Alts & SiiciH ts 
B.A. Knglish 




JOSEPH T. HOLLAND 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



MARGARET E. 
HOLLAND 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



MARY E. HONAN 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Marketing 



KATHERINE T. HOOPES 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



CHRISTOPHER J. 
HORAN 

School ol Management 
B.S. Finance 




PATRICIA M. HORAN 

Arts 8c Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



KATHLEEN M. 
HORRIGAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



KATHRYN J. HORTON WENDY W. HORTON 

School of Education 



School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



B.A. Elementary Education 



ANNE M. HOSKINS 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 




MARY U. HOSMER 

School of Education 
B.A. Middle School 



CLAIRE F. HOULIHAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



BRIAN HOURIHAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



KIMBERLY M. 
HOURIHAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



ELIZABETH A. 
HOWARD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psycholog)- 



Seniors / 377 



EMILY HOVVEY 


KYLE HUDGINS 


CATHERINE HUDSON 


EDWARD J. HUGHES 


ilOLLY E. HUGHES 


S( liiiol ol K.diK.illoii 

B.A. KMKli>li 
Secondary I'.diu.iiion 


Sdiool ol M.maf^ciiii'Ml 
U.S. C.ciicral Mgmt. 


.Alls ^- .S( iciKCS 
B.A. Malhcnialit.s 
C:<)niputcr Science 


.\rls iC' S{icii(i-s 

B.A. tnglish 

Economics 


School of Managcniciu 
B.S. Marketing 




SUSAN E. HUGHEY CLERIC! CAROL HUNT 

School of Education Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Early Childhood B.A. Psychology 



MARK A. HUNTER 

School of Management 
B.S. Markeung 



CHRISTINE H. 
HUNTINGTON 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



ANDRES C. HURWITZ 

Arts & Sciences 

B..\. History 

Philosophy 




MARYBETH HYLAND LAURA E. lANNETTA 

School of Education Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Elementary Education B.A. Political Science 



MARY ELLEN 
lANNUCCILLO 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



IVELISSE C. IGUINA 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



DARCY A. ILES 

School oi Education 
B.A. Moderate Special Needs 




LOUIS A. IMBRIANO DEAN R. INGLESE 

.Arts &: Sciences School of ManagcnuMU 

B..A. Communications B.S. Finance 



IRENE C. lOCONO CHRISTINE E. IPPOLITO ENRIQUE P. IRIZARRY 



School of NiMsing 
B.S. Nursing 



School of Maiiagcnicnt 
B.S. Finanic 



.Arts &: Sciences 
B..A. Political Science 



378 / Seniors 




ANNA L. ISON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biochemistry 



DAVID A. IX STEPHANIE A. JABAR STEPHEN B. JACKSON 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics B.A. Economics B.A. English 



KAREN A. JACOBI 

Arts Ji: Sciences 

B.A. English 
Communications 




LISA H. JACOBS 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



MARYBETH JACOBS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



CYRUS T. JAHAN 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



CAROLINE M. 
JAKUBOWICZ 

School of Education 

B.A. Elementary Education 

English 



DANIEL E. JAMES 

.-\rts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



Seniors / 379 



EWW^ff^ 



tL^mk 



y 





,-f^- 






THERESA E. JANACEK 


PAUL E. 


JAMES R. JELIN 


MICHAEL W. JEPP 


S( lidol <>l Nursing 


JANUSZEWSKI 


Alls X: Scicni fs 


Alls it Siic-nccvs 


li.S. Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


B.A. Knglisli 


15. A. I'xonomics 



Alls Ji: SciciK c's 
B.S. Uiology 



B.A. I'svc liology 




mMm 




MARK J. JIRTIAN 

School ot Management 
B.S. Finance 



CHRISTOPHER F. 
JODOIN 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



LAWRENCE A. JOEL 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

Philosophy 



CATHERINE A. 
JOHNSON 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

Communications 



JAY P. JOHNSON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Economics 




One's friends are that part of the human race with which one can be hunum. 

— George Santayana 




JENNIFER R. JOHNSON 

.\rts ^ Sciences 
B..-\. Psychology 




JUDITH C. JOHNSON 


.Arts ^- Scieiucs 
B.A. English 



380 / Seniors 




„y 




KURT V. JOHNSON 

School ol Maiicif;cMiiiil 

B.S. I'iiiaiitc 

Markciiiig 



LINDA JOHNSON 

Alls X; S( ifiu I's 
B.A. English 



LORETTA JOHNSON MARK C. JOHNSON 



Sthool oi M.in.tgciiiL-nl 
U.S. linaiKC 
Accounting 



Al Is X; .S( il-lli cs 
li.A. I'sycliology 



STEPHANIE L. 
JOHNSON 

School ol Management 
B.S. Marketing 




MICHAEL C. JONES 

School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



SCOTT C. JONES 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



MELINDA L. JOSEPH 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Computer Science 



MARGARET I. JOYCE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



MARY S. JOYCE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




MICHAEL P. JOYCE 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



SUSAN M. JUDGE 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



VYTAUTAS P. JURGELA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



LISA A. KACHNIC 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



DAVID R. KAISER 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

Philosophy 




TIMOTHY FRANCIS 
KALER 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



ALLISON KANE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



JACQUELINE E. KANE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Art History 



JOHN F. KANE 

School of Management 

B.S. Econoinics 

Finance 



SUZANNE E. KANE 

.Arts Ji: Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



Seniors / 381 



KENNETH B. KARAN STACEY A. KARDAMIS 



Alls &• Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



Si liool 1)1 Management 
B.S. Marketing 



KATHRYN A. 
KARLONAS 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



SILVIA KARMAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Art History 



TANYA L. KAROLY 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Economics 




SUZANNE E. KARPICK PAMELA KASPARIAN CAROLINE P. KATES KATHLEEN A. KAVEY 

School of Management Arts & Sciences Arts 8c Sciences Arts Sc Sciences 

B.S. Finance B.A. Speech Communication B.A. Economics B.A. English 



ROBERT J. KAVEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




KARIM T. KAWAR 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Computer Science 



JOAN F. KEANE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



MAURA T. KEANE 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



ANNE M. KEARNEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Mathematics 



EILEEN M. KEEFE 

School ot Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




MARGARET M. KEEFE MATTHEW E. KEEFE 



Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



KEEN A. KEEGAN 


KELLY A. KEELAN 


SUSAN R. KEENEY 


School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 


.Arts ic Sciences 
B.A. Economics 


School of Education 
B..\. Moderate Special Needs 



382 / Seniors 





■tf^^ 



ELIZABETH A. KEERS NANCY L. KEERS 



Scliool oi Kdiualioii 
B.A. Karly C;hil(l — .S|)cc iai Va\ 



Si IkioI (iI Manat,'i-iiK'iil 
li.S. Accoiinliiij; 




TIMOTHY C. 
KELLEHER. Ill 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



CHRISTOPHER J. 
KELLEY 

School ol Management 
B.S. Finance 




DIANA R. KELLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



,>^>J^'^ 



PETER M. KELLEY 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

Economics 



^^-^"^0^1 








RICHARD W. KELLEY STEPHEN S. KELLEY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 

Political Science 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



ROBERT KEIMIG 

St liool ni M.lll.l^cinflll 

li.S. Business A<im. 



RENEE KELLAN 

Alls iV S( iflK CS 

\^..\. (.oiniiuiiiicatioiis 



JACQUELINE J. 
KELLEHER 

Arts & Sticnci-i 
B..\. Omimimiralions 




Ah youth! The spark within us that can never quite be ex- 

— Scampeline Smithers 



tinguished 



Seniors / 383 




DAVID G. KELLY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psycholog\ 



JOHN J. KELLY 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

General Mgmt. 



KAREN P. KELLY 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



KAREN S. KELLY 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



LESA A. KELLY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



LORI A. KELLY 

Arts ic Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



NORA LEARY KELLY 

School of .Management 
B.S. Finance 




PATRICK W. KELLY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Psychology 

Philosophy 



PAUL F. KELLY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Fnglish 



PETER J. KELLY 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



ROBERT F. KELLY 

.Arts t<: Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



TIMOTHY G. KELLY 

.\rts S; Sciences 
B.S. Biochemistry 



384 / Seniors 




PATRICK J. KELTER 



School ol Maniigcnicnt 
B.S. Finance 



MARGARET M 
KENNEDY 

Alts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



JOHN M. KENNEY 



Sihiiol ol MaiKigemcMl 
B.S. Marketing 



MARY E. KENNEY 



School ol Managi-rncMl 
B.S. Accouiiliiig 



PHILIP J. KENNEY 

Arts & .Sciences 
B..\. History 




SEAN P. KEOHANE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Theater Arts 



JAMES S. KERNAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



BRIAN J. KERSHAW 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



NICOLA J. KERWIN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 

Romance Language 



BETHANY KESSLER 

School of Education 
B.A. Elem. — Special Eciucation 




PAUL T. KEVENY SYLVIE D. KHORENIAN CLARKE E. KHOURY 

School of Management Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 



B.S. Marketing 



B.S. Biology 



B.A. English 
Philosophy 



AUGUSTINE J. 
KIDWELL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



STEPHANY T. KIELY 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




MIKI KIKUSHIMA 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



EILEEN A. KILKELLY 

School of Education 
B.A. Middle School 



JAMES J. KILLEEN CHARLES E. KILMAIN 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



KAREN D. KILROY 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



Seniors / 385 



NANCY H. KIM 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



PATRICIA A. KINAHAN 

School ol Manaj^cnicnt 
B.S. Management 



DIANA KING 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. An History 



JEFFREY D. KING 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



JOHN P. KING 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Marketing 




NEIL J. KINKOPF 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 
Political Science 



ELIZABETH A. KINVILLE 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.S. Mathematics 



KARI BETH KIPF 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



NATASH KIRBY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



ANNE M. KIRITSY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 




PETER T. KITSILIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



LAURA M. KLANIAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



DONNA L. KLIGERMAN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 

English 



JOHN A. KLINE. JR. 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 

Psychology 



BARBARA A. KLOECK 

School of Education 
B.A. Earlv Childhood 




SUSAN M. KMIETEK 

School of Education 
B.A. Early Childhood 



STEVEN J. KNIGHT 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



SARAH I. KOEHNE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



KATHLEEN M. KOEN KIMBERLY KOHOSKIE 



School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



.Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



386 / Seniors 



FRANK R. KOLUCKI 

Alts &: Stienccs 
B.S. Biology 



MARK G. KOMAR SHELLY M. KOPRUSAK GRETCHEN M. KORN 



Arts iL- Sciciitcs 
B.A. Economics 



Ai Is i^ Sciences 
B.A, Ojmmunications 



Alts iL: Sciences 
B.S. Mathematics 



RICHARD L. 
KORZELIUS 

School 1)1 Management 

li.S. Finance 

(lompiiter Science 




WILLIAM G. KOTZUBA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



DEMOS KOUVARIS 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



GEORGINA L. KRAIN 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



KIMBERLY A. KRAL 

School of Education 
B.A. Elem. — Special Education 



CATHERINE M. 
KRENICKY 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




KARL L. KRESHPANE 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 




ANGELA M. KUHNEL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 




Seniors / 387 



DOROTHY J. KUKFA 

Arts 8c Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

English 



KYRA A. KULIK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



PATRICIA A. KUSTER 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



MARGRET L. LABORE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



LISA A. LABELLA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 





ROBERT R. LABENSKI 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MARGRET LABORE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




MARINA LABOY 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



ALYSON P. 
LADENDORFF 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. History 
Communications 




HOPE J. LAFFERTY MARY E. LAFLAMME 



Alts &: Sciences 

B.A. Psvchologv 

Sociology 



.Arts S: Sciences 
B.S. Biocheniistrv 



388 / Seniors 




ROSEMARIE LAFLEUR 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



JULIA LAFOND 

School o( Manageniciu 
B.S. Finance 



LEIGHANNE LAKE ELIZABETH M. LAMB PATRICIA M. LAMB 



Alls & Sciences 
B.A. Knglish 



.\iis S: .Sciences 
B.A. ( ioniinunicalions 



S( lio'il of Nursing 
B.S. .Nursing 







VINCENT W. 
LAMPARELLI 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



WILLIAM FISK 
LANDERS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



DIANA E. LANE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



MARY T. LANE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



KERRY A. LANGDON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




MONIKA LANGE 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



MONICA C. LAPIERRE PETER F. LAPOINTE 

Arts & Sciences School of Management 

B.A. Studio Art B.S. Marketmg 



JOY A. LARAMIE 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



LAURA C. LARKINS 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. English 
Communications 




ELIZABETH A. LATTA MAUREEN A. LAURIE ANDREW J. LAB ASH CATHLEEN M. LAVEY 

Arts & Sciences School of Education Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Computer Science B.A. Elementary Education B.A. History B.A. Computer Science 

English 



JEFFREY C. LAVEY 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 

Finance 



Seniors / 389 



SUZANNE M. LAVIN OWEN W. LAWLOR SIOBHAN T. LAWLOR JENNIFER E. LAYNE 



Arts it: Sciences 
B.A. Communiialions 



Scliocil ol Miin.igemeiit 

B.S. Finance 

Marketing 



Arts it Sciences 
B.A. English 



Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



MARY P. LEAHY 

•Xrts Ji: Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




MARGUERITE A. LEARY PATRICIA A. LEARY TIMOTHY V. LEBLANC LISETTE J. LEBRUN 

Arts 8c Sciences School of Nursing Arts & Sciences Arts 8c Sciences 

B.A. Philosophy B.S. Nursing B.A. Economics B.S. Chemistry 



CYNTHIA E. LEE 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




DEBRA LEE 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



KARL LEE 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MONICA LEE 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Art History 



SELENA LEE 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



KEVIN LEHNER 

School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 




JACOB D. LEHRER KENNETH J. LEITNER 



School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



LAUREN J. LEJA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



PAULA C. LELAND 

.\rts &: Sciences 
B.A. ComniiHiications 



MARY E. LEMAY 

School ot Education 

B.A. English 
Romance Language 
Secondar\ Education 



390 / Seniors 




STEPHEN J. LEMPITSKI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




JILL A. LENKOWICZ 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Marketing 




/ used to think that anyone doing anything weird was weird. I suddenhj realized thai 
anyone doing anything weird wasn't weird at all, and that it was the people saying 
they were weird who were weird. — Paul McCartney 




■V- 





MICHAEL T. LEONARD PATRICIA A. LEONARD 

School of Management Arts Sc Sciences 

B.S. Finance B.A. Theology 

Economics 



NICOLE J. LEPOUTRE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Romance 

Language 



ROBERT G. LEVY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biochemistry 



ANNETTE E. LEWIS 

School of Management 
B.S. Unclassified 




BRIAN E. LEWIS 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



CATHERINE M. 
LIBERATORI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



JOY MARIA LIBERTINI 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 

Finance 



KRISTIN M. 
LIFVENDAHL 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



JOSEPH P. LIMONE 

,\rts S: Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



Seniors / 391 



MYRNA A. LINARDOS PAMELA J. LINDGREN 



Alts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 
ClompiUcr Science 



Alts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

Philosophy 



MARY K. LINDLEY 

Alts S; .Sciences 
B.A. English 



JOSEPH R. LINNEHAN : LLOYD LIPSETT 



School ol Management 
B.S. MaikctMig 



Arts it- Sciences 
B.A. Political .Science 




THOMAS J. LIVACCARl TIMOTHY A. LIZOTTE JEANNE M. LOFTUS 

School of Management School of Management School of Eciucation 

B.S. Finance B.S. Accounting B.A. Elementary Education 



JODI M. LOLIK 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

English 



PATRICK M. LONG 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




School of Management 
B.S. .Accounting 



392 / Seniors 



i / 




CLARA E. LOPEZ 

Arts & SciciKcs 
B.A. Econoinics 



VIVIENNE E. LOPEZ GERARD F. LORDEN FREDERICK B. LORENZ ERIN M. LORSUNG 



S( liool of Kdiualioii 
li.A. KlciiiciUary Kdiualioii 



S( IkidI (iI Mariagfiririii 
B.S. KiiiaiKi- 



S( liiirjl III Maiiaj;ciMciil 
B.S. Kiiiaiuc 



.Arts Sc S(iiiKi-s 
B.S. Biology 




ANTHONY P. LORUSSO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



PATRICIA C. 
LOUGHMAN 

School ot Education 

B.A. Human Development 

Psychology 



JOHN H. LOUTH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ADAM A. LOWE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 
Political Science 



MICHAEL LUCAS 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




JANE C. LUEDERS 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



RANDALL LUI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



ROBERT K. LUM 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



JEANNE M. 
LUNGHAMER 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Romance 

Language 



ALLISON M. LUPPINO 

School ol Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




JUD I. LUPPINO RICHARD S. LUPPINO 



School of Management 
B.S. Business Adm. 



School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



JOHN J. LYNCH 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. History 

Secondary Education 



MARK D. LYNCH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



PAUL F. LYNCH 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



Seniors / 393 







TIMOTHY P. LYNCH RACHEL A. LYONS LOIS K. MACULUSO DAWN M. MACASKILL 



Alls & SticiKi's 
B.A. Psychology 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



Arts &: .Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



DOUGLAS 
MACDONALD 

.\rts & Sciences 
B..A. Theology 

Latin 




KATHLEEN F. 
MACDONALD 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



MARIA M. MACDONALD OLAVO B. MACEDO 

School of Management Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Computer Science B.A. Political Science 



JAMES P. 
MACGILLIVRAY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



DUNIA E. MACGREGOR 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 




KIMBERLY A. 
MACHADO 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



LYNN MACKEY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 
Communication 



ELIZABETH A. 
MACLEAN 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



MICHAEL P. MACLEAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



FRANCIS P. 
MACMILLAN, JR. 

.Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Economics 




MARY P. MACPHERSON DEAN E. MAFEI 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



School o( Management 

B.S. Economics 

Finance 



CHRISTINE M. MAGGIO 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



FREDERICK E. 
MAGUIRE 

•Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 

Communications 

Mathematics 



JOHN K. MAGUIRE 

.Arts i: Sciences 

B.A. PsvchologTi 

English 



394 / Seniors 



RICHARD J. MAGUIRE 

Alls c<; Sriciucs 
B.S. Biolofry 



MARILYN MAH 

Sdiixil 111 M.iiKimiiuiil 
U.S. M.irkiMiii)^ 



ROBERT J. MAHONEY KARL E. MAIER 

School of Management School of Management 

B.S. Finance B.S. Marketing 



Vs W '^' 




>v- ■ ; 



CHRISTOPHER B. 
MAIONA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



ANN M. MAJEWSKI 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



ANDREW J. MAHFOOD 

Si llOiil (t| M.in.l^CIIKIll 

U.S. linaiicc 
C^(>iiij)ui<.T Science 

1,( ()ii()iiii( s 





SUZANNE T. MAJEWSKI KENNETH F. MALE 

School of Management School of Management 

B.S. Finance B.S. Marketmg 
Human Resources Mgmnt. 



MEGHAN E. 
MAHONEY 

Arts & SciciKcs 
B..^. Clonwminicilions 



PETER S. MAHONEY 

.\l Is \; St iflKis 

B.S, Physics 




We're getting older as time goes by, a little with every day. 
We were the children, yesterday. — Cat Stevens 



Seniors / 395 




We have lived and loved together 
Through rnanij changing years 
We have shared each other s gladness 
And wept each other s tears 



And let us hope the future 
As the past has been will be 
I will share with you my sorrows 
And you your joys with me. 




MARIA J. MALIN 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. English 
Communications 




ANN C. MALLY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psycholog)' 




JOHNNA S. MANCA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



MARK MANCINELLI, i RICHARD J. MANGANO 

Arts Sc Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics B.A. Economics 



JAMES F. 
MANISCALCO 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



CAROL A. MANNING 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




LISA A. MANNING 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



CHRISTOPHER MARA MARIA C. MARINA 



School of Management 
B.S. Management 



■"Vrts &: Sciences 
B.S. Economics 



DIANE P. MARKART KATHERINE I. MARKEY 



School ot Management 
B.S. Finance 



School ol Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



396 / Seniors 




CHRISTINE E. MARR JAMES E. MARRAN PATRICIA A. MARRO LISA B. MARSEGLIA JOHN A. MARSHALL 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



Alts & Scienn-s 

B.A. English 
Communications 



Alls t^- St K-IK fS 

B.A. Sociology 



S( honi of I.(lu( .liioii 

B.A. Human Development 

Studio Art 



.\l Is \: S< K-iM e 
B.S. Biulogy 




KENNETH D. 
MARSHALL 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



ALICIA M. MARTEN 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



KAREN L. MARTIN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Biology 
Political Science 



KAROL-ANN MARTIN 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



KELLY A. MARTIN 

.Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Computer Science 




KELVIN B. MARTIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



MARGARET A. MARTIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 
Romance Language 



MARY E. MARTIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ANNE E. MARTINELLI 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



JOHN MARTINEZ 

Arts S: Sciences 

B..\. Psychology 

Art History 




KIMBERLY A. 
MARTONE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



MICHAEL J. MASCOLL STEPHEN MASIELLO KAREN M. MASKARA DEBORAH A. MASONE 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences .Arts &: Sciences School of Management 



B.A. Communications 



B.A. English 
History 



B.A. Political Science 
English 



B.S. Marketmg 



Seniors / 397 





mmk 



ELIZABETH A. 
MASSARO 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 

Maikelinf^ 



RAYMOND M. 
MASTROIANNI 

School ol Management 
B.S. Finance 



JENNIFER R. CHARMAINE J. MATTIS ■ JAMES V. MAURO 

MATTHEWS .\ns & Sciences ,\rt.s & Sciences 

Arts & Sciences _ B-A- English B.A. Kconomics 

B.A. Romance Language 



Communications 




ANNE M. MAXWELL 


DEBRA A. MAYNARD 


DYANN C. MAZZEO 


SUSAN J. MCALEAVEY 


PAUL B. MCALEER 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


B.A. Psychology 


B.A. Psychology 


B.S. Biology 


B.A. Communications 


B.A. Economics 




EILEEN T. MCALLISTER 


GERALD N. MCAREE 


KAREN J. MCCABE 


KATHLEEN E. 


MARK MCCAFFERTY 


Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Romance Language 


School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 


School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 


MCCAFFERTY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Psychology 

Philosophy 


School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 




MARGARET M. 
MCCAFFREY 

School of Education 

B.A. English 
Human Development 



KATHLEEN P. MCCALL BRIAN C. MCCANN 



School of Education 

B.A. Elementary Education 

English 



Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 
Communications 



MARK R. MCCANN 

.Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. English 



SUSAN P. MCCANN 

.Arts &■ Sciences 
B..-\. Economics 



398 / Seniors 




PAULA A. MCCARRON EILEEN MCCARTHY JUSTIN E. MCCARTHY MARY K. MCCARTHY 



School of Managcnicnl 
B.S. Accounting 



Arts it Sciences 

B.A. Kcononiics 

English 



Alts & S< icMd-S 
B.A. Ooinnuniiiations 



,S( houl (il M.in.igcrniiii 
B.S. Marketing 



MARY LOUISE 
MCCARTHY 

SthcHjl c)l .\ursjng 
B.S. Nursing 




NANCY E. MCCARTHY 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



PATRICIA M. 
MCCARTHY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



SUSAN ANN 
MCCARTHY 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



SHARON A. MCCARTY SHARON E. MCCAUL 

Arts &: Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications B.A. English 




HEATHER M. 
MCCAULEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 




HOLLY A. MCCAULEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



m 



Iv 




These are the days to remember, cause they will not last forever. These are the times 
to hold on to, 'cause we won't although we'll want to. 



Seniors / 399 







ELIZABETH A. 
MCCLAIN 

School ol M,im;ij;ciii(IiI 
U.S. M;iiki-linn 



MOIRA M. MCCOLLAM 

Alls c<: SticiKc-s 

14. A. Political Siiciicc 

Ooninuiiiicacions 



jF-—*^- 




CHRISTINE M. 
MCCONVILLE 

Arts iK: Stifiites 

B.A. English 

I listoi V 




X 




/ still know quite certanly that just to be alive is a grand 
thing. — Agatha Christie 



JACQUELINE A. 
MCCOURI 

School ol Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JOHN A. MCDADE 

S( IkxjI (»1 Management 
B.S. Finance 




JOSEPH A. MCDADE VICKIE R. MCDANIEL 

School of Management School of Management 

B.S. Marketing B.S. Marketmg 




JOHN P. MCDERMOTT 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



CHRISTOPHER M. 
MCDEVITT 

.Arts ii: Sciences 
B.S. Biolog\- 




BRIAN MCDONALD ELLEN M. MCDONALD 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 
Accounting 



School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



400 / Seniors 



HUGH M. MCDONALD KEVIN P. MCDONALD LISA M. MCDONALD 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



Alts it Sciences 
B.A. Coinmunicalions 



.School ol Nuisiiij; 
B.S. Nursing 



MAUREEN P. 
MCDONALD 


TIMOTHY J. 
MCDONOUGH 


Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 


Arls & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




JAMES C. MCELENEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



COLLEEN C. 
MCFADDEN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



PAUL J. MCGAHREN LORRAINE A. MCGEE 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English B.S. Biology 



RAMONA MCGEE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




PATRICK C. 
MCGILLICUDDY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ERIN B. MCGINLEY 

School of Education 
B.A. Elem — Special Education 



JAMES J. MCGINN THOMAS H. MCGIRR SARA A. MCGOVERN 

Arts & Sciences Arts 8c Sciences .^rts &: Sciences 

B.A. English B.A. Economics B.A. Communications 




SHELLEY A. MCGOWN MARIE E. MCGRAIN 



School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



MEGAN MCGRATH 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



SUSAN E. MCGUIRK 

.Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Communications 



DONNA P. MCINTYRE 

School of Education 

B.A. Human Development 

Romance Language 



Seniors / 401 



PAUL M. MCINTYRE PETER F. MCINTYRE 



A US & Sciences 
B.A. English 



School of Management 
U.S. Accounting 



TARA MCKENNA 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 

Philosophy 



KAREN J. MCKENZIE :MARIBETH MCKEON 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B. A. Communications B.A. Communications 




H. BROOKS MCKINLEY JILL A. MCKINNON 

School of Management School of Nursing 



B.S. Marketmg 



B.S. Nursing 



BRENDA A. 
MCLAUGHLIN 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



COLLEEN MCLAUGHLIN 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



DANIEL P. 
MCLAUGHLIN 

.Arts i' Sciences 
B.A. English 




KATHLEEN 
MCLAUGHLIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



PAUL G. MCLAUGHLIN M. DANIEL MCLEOD 

School of Management School of Nursing 

B.S. Accounting B.S. Nursing 



ANNAMARIE 

MCMAHON 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 

Philosophy 



DANIEL H. MCMAHON 

.Arts lii; Sciences 
B..A. Economics 




MARY MEEHAN 
MCMAHON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Theology 



THOMAS N. MCMANUS DANIEL E. MCMARTIN JEAN M. MCMILLAN 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



.Arts & Sciences 

B..A. Communications 

Sociology 



THOMAS J. 
MCNABB. JR. 

.Arts i: Sciences 
B..A. Political Science 



402 / Seniors 




MAUREEN K. MCNALLY BRIAN R. MCNAMARA 



Alls &r Siicntcs 
B.A. Political Science 



Ai Is Ji: SiifiKcs 
B.A. Coniniuiiicali()n.s 



KATHLEEN A. 
MCNAMARA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



MARTHA E. 
MCNAMARA 

Alts & .Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



MARGARETE A. 
MCNEICE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 









CYNTHIA M. MCPHIE HELEN P. MCSWEENEY 

School of Nursing Arts & Sciences 



B.S. Nursing 



B.S. Geology 



JOANNE M. MEAD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



MATTHEW MEADE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



MELISSA MEADE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 




JANET A MEE 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



KRISTIN M. MEHOLIC CHRISTINA B. MELADY KEVIN P. MELANCON SHERYL A. MELANSON 



Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



.•\rts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 

Philosophy 




PAUL MELIAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



STEPHEN J. MELSON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



IRENE P. MELVILLE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



KAREN M. MENDALKA 

.\rts & Sciences 

B.A. Romance Language 

Political Science 



PHILIP G. MENNA 

.Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



Seniors / 403 



KELLY A. 


MENNENGA 


PETER MERAI 


MICHELE M. MERCIER 


JENNIFER H. 


'ELLEN J. MESROBIAN 


School 
B.S. 


ol Nursing 
Nursing 


Arts & Scif ncx'S 
B.S. Biology 


Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 

Philosophy 


MERRIFIELD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Romance Language 


School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




LUCAS D. MESSIA 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



DAVID W. MEYERS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



IVAN D. MEZA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



CHANTAL MICHEL 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. History 



CHARLES D. MICOL 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 




^Jh^i^tMd 



RICHARD P. 
MIESZCZANSKI 

School of Management 
B.S. Human Resources Mgmnt. 



CHRISTOPHER J. 
MILANI 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



STEPHEN T. MILLAN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 

History 



BRIAN A. MILLER 

.Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. History 

Economics 



JANET MILLER 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




PAUL MILLER 

School of Management 
B.S. Management 



REHNA A. MILLER 

Arts &■ Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



ROBERT M. MINGIONE 

.■\ris it Sciences 

B..\. Romance Language 

Economics 



ANDREA G. 
MINICHIELLO 

School of Ninsing 
B.S. Ninsing 



DENIS N. MINIHANE 

.Arts &: Sciences 
B..\. Economics 



404 / Seniors 




CHARLES P. MIRABILE 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.S. (Chemistry 




SUSAN E. MISASl 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




The finest years I ever knew were all the years I had with you. Nobody else could 
ever know, the part of me that can't let go. — Bread 




DANIELLE H. MISTELE AILEEN P. MITCHELL 

School of Management Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Computer Science B.A. Economics 

Finance 



BARRY P. MITCHELL 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Marketing 



KATHLEEN C. 
MITCHELL 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



KELLY A MOHAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




ARIANE MOHIT 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



ELISABETH S. MOLINA JOHN K. MOLLOY 



School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



JOHN R. MOLORI 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



KATHLEEN A. 
MOLUMPHY 

.Arts ic Sciences 
B..A. Communications 



Seniors / 405 



JOHN J. MONAHAN 

Arts & Siicnccs 

B.A. Ooiiipulir Science 

Mathematics 



STEPHANIE A. 
MONAHOS 

Arts 8c Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



JEFFREY D. MONIZ HUGH M. MONTAGUE 

School ol Management School ol Management 



B.S. Accounting 



B.S. Economics 



CHRISTINE M. 
MONTENEGRO 

School of .Management 

B.,\. .\ccounting 

I'hilosophy 




1 



^M^^ 



MARIA F. MONTUORI KELLY A. MOONEY JENNIFER A. MOORE JOHN R. MORAN 

Arts & Sciences Ans & Sciences School of Education Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science B.S. Biology B.A. Human Development B.A. Economics 



CHRISTOPHER J. 
MORANO 

School ol Manageinent 
B.S. Finance 





BRIDGET T. MORGAN 

School ol Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




NORAH A. MORGAN 

.\rts Ji: Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



406 / Seniors 



NICOLE A. 
MORGANTHALER 

Arts S: Sciences 
B.A. Polilleal Science 



KAREN A. MORIARTY 

Ail> & Siiciucs 
B.S. Biology 



LAURA MORGAN 
MORITZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ANN MORLEY 

.S( Jiool <il .M.iti.i^cnienl 
B.S. Management 



KATHRYN M. MORLEY 

Si llCKil ol Nlll Mllg 

B.S. Nursing 




TERESA A. MORREALE KELLY MORRELL 

School of Nursing School of Education 

B.S. Nursing B.A. Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 



CLAUDIA R. MORRIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



JOSEPH E. MORRIS 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



JOHN E. MORSE 

School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 




KEITH P. MORTENSON GILES E. MOSHER 

Arts & Sciences School of Management 

B.A. Economics B.S. Marketmg 



MARYANN MOSHIRI KAREN B. MOSTELLER 

Arts & Sciences School of Management 

B.A. Psychology B.S. Human Resources Mgmnt. 



ANDREA S. 
MOYNIHAN 

.\rts & Sciences 
B..A. Philosophy 




SIOBHAN T. 
MOYNIHAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



TIMOTHY J. JULIE E. MUELLER PAMELA B. MUGFORD SHARON M. MULLANE 

MOYNIHAN School of Management School of Nursing .Arts S; Sciences 

School of Management BS- Marketmg B.S. Nursing B.S. Biology 
B.S. Finance 



Seniors / 407 



CHRISTINE G. MULLEN JOHN C. MULLIGAN 

Scliool ol Kdinatioii Alls K: Scionccs 

B.A. Elem. — Special Education B.A. English 



WALLACE P. MULLIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KIRSTIN M. MUNDY 

Arts it Sciences 
B.A, Mathematics 
Computer Science 



VINCENT C. MUNN 

.•\rts Ji; Scieiues 
B.A. Communications 




JAMES E. MURPHY, JR. 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



KAREN M. MURPHY 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



KATHLEEN MURPHY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



KIMBERLY A. 
MURPHY 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



MARGARET L. MURPHY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

Theatre 




MARIANNE MARTHA 
MURPHY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 
Computer Science 



MICHAEL MURPHY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



PETER P. MURPHY RICHARD P. MURPHY SHEILA J. MURPHY 



Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Economics 



School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Human Resources Mgmnt. 



School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




ANN C. MURRAY 

Arts it Sciences 
B.A. Romance Language 



KAREN E. MURRAY 

School ol Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



LISA A. MURRAY 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MICHELLE M. MURRAY SUSAN A. MURRAY 



School oi KdiKvitic^n 
B..\. Human Development 



School ol Managemem 
B.S. Finance 



408 / Seniors 






WILLIAM S. 
MURRAY, JR. 

School ol ManancMU'Til 

B.S. AccoLiMliiig 

Finance 



CHRISTINE M. MYERS JODIE L. MYERS 

Ai Is &.■ S( ii'iiifs Silidcilol M, III, 1^(111(111 
B.A. Malhciiuilics IVS. Maikciiii^; 

Clonipuld Sc icncc 



ANNA M. MYKIETYN ROBERT G. NAJARIAN 




MADHAV B. 
NARAYANA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biochemistry 



GEORGE NASSER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




MARIE C. NAVEIRA 

School of Management 

B.S. Computer Science 

Finance 



LOUISE C. NEARY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Psychology 

Romance Language 




ELISABETH 
A. NEELON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



KIMBERLY A. NEHILEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



.Alls <V S( icn( cs 

B.A, PhiloMipliy 

MaliicMialics 



S( IliMil ol M.lll.lHCIIK III 

B.S. Atcuunting 




Love, n: a temporary insanity curable by marriage or by the 
removal of the patient frorn the influences under which he 
incurred the disorder. — Ambrose Bierce 



Seniors / 409 




f\NCE J. NELSON 


LINDA NELSON 


LISA A. NERSESIAN 


WENDY CAROLYN 


Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

Economics 


School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 


School of Management 

B.S. Economics 

Marketing 


NEUMAN 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. English 



MICHAEL V. NEUMANN 

.Arts c<: Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

Economics 

Computer Science 




PETER E. NEUMEIR ALICE ANNE NEVILLE 



Arts is; Sciences 
B.A. History 



.Arts X: Sciences 
B.A. Commiinicalions 



HUYEN-ANH C. 
NGUYEN 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MAUREEN C. NICKELS KELLY NICKESON 



School ol Manaj;cmonl 
B.S. .Accoinuini; 



.\rts &: Sciences 
B..\. Communications 



410 / Seniors 



CHRISTIE L. 


SEVIANTO NISMARA 


ELSIE T. NOLAND 


LINDA M. NOONAN 


MICHAEL NOLAN 


NICOLAIDES 

School ot Miinaj^t'iiK'iU 
U.S. Maikcliiig 


S( hool (>l M.iii.imMiR'iil 

U.S. Finance 

Economics 


.\lls X; S( icMi cs 

B.A. Kngiish 
Connnunicalions 


S( iioiil oj M.iii.i]'i-iri(-n[ 
B.S. Marketing 


Alls & Sticnccb 
B.A. History 




ROBIN L. NORDLINGER GEORGE M. NORMAN PHILIP J. NORTON, III SHAWN D. NORTON BRUCE H. NORWELL 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences School ol Management .\rts & Sciences 

B.A. English B.A. Economics B.S. Marketing B.A. Political Science 



B.A. Communications 




PATRICIA G. NOVAK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



NANCY NOVO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Psychology 

Economics 



ANDREA P. NUGENT 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



DAVID R. NUGENT EILEEN P. NUGENT 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



School ol Education 

B..\. Human Development 

English 




MARGARET E. NUGENT MICHAEL NYHAN 

Arts Be Sciences School of Management 

B.A. Communications B.S. Accounting 



CHRISTINA O'DAY SUZANNE O'GRADY 



.Arts & Sciences 
B..A. History/Spanish 



.\rts ic Sciences 

B.A. 

Philosophy/Communications 



KATHLEEN E. 
O'MALLEY 

.Arts &: Sciences 
B..\. Romance Language 



Seniors / 411 



STEPHEN P. 
O'SULLIVAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



RICHARD D. OBER 

Arts ii: Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



LEAH L. OBIAL 

Schofjl ol ManaKcnicnt 
B.S. Marketing 



CATHLEEN M. O'BRIEN CHRISTINE O'BRIEN 



School ol Managcniciu 
B.S. Finance 



.\ns & .Sciences 
B.A. Classics 




JOHN M. O'BRIEN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



MAUREEN E. O'BRIEN PATRICK D. O'BRIEN STEPHEN E. O'BRIEN THOMAS H. O'BRIEN 

Arts & Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Management 

B.S. Biochemistry B.S. Finance B.S. Accounting B.S. Finance 





^ \ 



MARIA VITTORIA 


CANDACE A. 


KATHLEEN M. 


NANCY M. O'CONNELL 


GWYNETH E. 


OCCHI 


O'CONNELL 


O'CONNELL 


School of Nursing 


O'CONNOR 


Arts &: Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


B.S. Nursing 


School of Education 


B.S. Biology 


B.A. Elementary Educaton 


B.A. Studio Art 




B..\. Elementary Education 
Severe Spec. Needs 




RICHARD P. 
O'CONNOR 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



THOMAS J. 
O'CONNOR 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



MAUREEN A. O'CONOR AURELIE A. ODEA 



School of Managemenl 
B.S. Human Rcs<iurces Mgnnil. 



School ol Ninsiuij 
B.S. Nursing 



ELIZABETH A. 
O'DONNELL 

School ol Management 
B.S. Finance 
Accoimting 



412 / Seniors 




MAUREEN R. 


SCOTT M. O'DONNELL 


ANNE L O'DWYEK 


NANCY F. O'GARA 


O'DONNELL 


Scliool ol Manafferiiciil 


Alls X: S{ icru ts 


Si hijol (il |-,du( .iiioii 


School ol Education 


B.S. Accounting 


B.A. I'syeliology 


li.A. Karly Child — Special Kd 


■ A. Severe Spec. Needs 


I'inancc 







Alls A; St lences 

U.A. Cloiniiiunications 

Philosophy 




DIANE E. O'HARA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 
Computer Science 



JOSEPH F. O'HARA 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 




KATHLEEN L. OLIVIERI 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 





I 


^ 




1 


1 


^ 


m 




I 


'' 


M 


1 


1 


„ '*■ 


J' 


i 









ANNE M. O'MALLEY 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



4iiAm 



SUSAN K. 
OHRENBERGER 

School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



WILLIAM JOSEPH 
O'KANE 

School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



JEFFREY PETER 
OLIVER 

School of .Management 
B.S. Marketing 




Seniors / 413 




JEFFREY OMALLEY 

S(. hool ()1 MaM.i_m'iiK'ni 
B.S. Business Mgiiit. 



KATHLEEN E. 
OMALLEY 

Alts & Scifiucs 
H.A. Roniaiuc Languages 



COLIN M. O'NEIL MARYELLEN C. O'NEILL : KATHLEEN T. ONG 



Alls I'v; SticiH cs 
B.A. Political Sciciuc 




/ ahvaysfelt that the great high privilege, relief and comfort 
of friendship was that one had to explain nothing. 

— Katherine Mansfield 



Alt>> cV' SliL-MlL-S 

li.A. Kcononiics 



Arts \: S< iciKi-s 
li.A. Poliiical Science 




CHRISTOPHER F. 
O'REILLY 

School ot Management 

B.S. Marketing 

Finance 



KELLY A. O'REILLY 

School of Education 
B.A. Elem. — Special Education 




MARIA ORLANDO MICHAEL J. ORRICK 



.Arts ic Sciences 
B..^. Psychology 



Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. English 




CHRISTOPHER S. 
ORTEGA 

.Arts ^- Sciences 
B..A. Computer Science 



MAUREEN OSCHELL 

.\rts t'i; Sciences 
B..A. Mathematics 



414 / Seniors 



KEVIN T. OSGOOD 

Alls S; S( iciKcs 

B.A. (loiniiuinitalions 

I'.iij^lisli 



KIERAN K. 
O'SHAUGHNESSY 

Arts it S( iciKcs 

B.A. Knglish 
Conimunitalions 



KEVIN P. O'SHEA 

Alls & .Sciciitcs 
14. A. Hislory 



WILLIAM F. O'SHEA 

Alls I'v: .S< iciufs 
li.A. I'i>lili(al Scii'iitc 



CAROL ANN 
OSTROWSKI 

Alls & .SciciRi's 
B.A, Fsy< li(.li)g>' 




JAMES T. OSTROWSKI 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



KATHRYN 
O'SULLIVAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Psychology 



STEPHEN P. 
OSULLIVAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



KAREN M. O'TOOLE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



TIMOTHY J. O'TOOLE 

.Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biochemistry 




KARA E. OTTONE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



JAMES J. OWENS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



KAREN E. PACE 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



PETER J. PACELLA 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



KIM PACHETTI 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Social Sciences 




NORMAN PAGE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Romance Language 



MARCO R. PALMER 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



LOUIS R. PALMIERI 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Theology 

Philosophy 



JOANNE M. 
PALUMBO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



SUZANNE C. PANNUTO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



Seniors / 415 



DANA M. PANTOS 

School of Maiiam'iiU'iil 

U.S. liiiaiKC 

Computer Science 



JOHN S. PAOLILLO LINDA PAPARGIRIS DONNA M. PARADIE : HILLERY A. PARKER 



Alls & Sciences 
15. A. Mathematics 



School o( Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



S( IhjoI of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



.Arts & Sciences 
B..\. I'oliiical Science 




WILLIAM E. PARSLEY MARTIN J. PASQUALINI CHRISTOPHER 

School of Management Arts & Sciences PATTERSON 

B.S. Finance B.A. Political Science School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



AMY L. PAUL 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



ELAINE NINON PAUL 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




MARGARET PECHILIO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



ALISON R. PECK 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Marketing 



SANDRA L. PEDROTTY 

School of Education 
B.A. Elem. — Special Education 



MICHAEL J. 
PEKKARINEN 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 

Finance 



SUSAN E. PEKOCK 

School ol Eclucatit)n 
B.A. Human Development 




ANTHONY PELINO LISA M. PELLEGRINO CAMILLE M. PELLETIER DONNA J. PELLETIER MICHAEL J. PELLINI 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Romance Language 



School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



.•\rts ^- Sciences 

B.A. Psychology 

Econiiniics 



School ol ManagcnuMU 
B.S. Markeluig 



.Arts is; Sciences 
B..A. Economics 



416 / Seniors 



WENDY M. 
PENNINGTON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. C^oniinunlcalioiis 



JOSE CARLOS PEREIRA MARIA C. PEREZ MARGARET S. PERKINS DANIEL D. PERLEY 



Sdidol ()( MaiMf^c'incnl 
U.S. liiiaiKc 



Arls He Sciences 
b.A. Psychology 



S( hool o) K(iu( anon 
IVA. I'.lenicnlai V Kducalioii 



Arls & Siieni cs 

li.A. Comniunitations 

Theater Arts 




KATHRYN PEROTTI 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A.Romance Language 

Philosophy 



ROBERT E. PERRY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Enghsh 



KATHRYN M. PETERS KATHLEEN M. RUTH A. PETIT 

Arts & Sciences PETERSON School ol Education 

B.S. Psychology School of Education BA. Human Development 

B.A. Elem. — Special Education 




JOHN J. PETOSA 

School of Manageinent 

B.S. Economics 

Accounting 



LUIGI R. PETRUZZIELLO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



MICHAEL T. PFAU 

Arts Sc Sciences 

B.A. Psychology 

Philosophy 



MARY T. PHAYRE 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



PATRICIA A. PHENIX 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




ANNE M. PHILBIN 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



CONNIE ANNE 
PHILLIPS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



PHO T. PHUNG 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Computer Science 

Mathematics 



KATHERINE M. PICK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



DAVID R. PICKETT 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Romance Language 

Philosophy 



Seniors / 417 




mtCft^:^ 



JOIE M. PIDERIT 


PATRICIA A. PIECHOTA 


CYNTHIA A. PIERCE 


MICHAEL W. 


: DENISE C. PINAUD 


Arts & .S( iciKcs 


Alls i<.- Sticiucvs 


Arts i^- ScifiMcs 


PIETKIEWICZ 


School of Nursing 


B.A. Philosophy 


B.y\. I'ohliciil Sticntc 


B.S. Biology 


Arts &L Sciences 


B.S. Nursing 


Mathcnialics 




Psychology 


B.A. Economics 






ANDREA W. PINGETON DIANE T. PINTABONE 

School of Nursing Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Nursing B.A. Classics 



ALICE F. PIPPITT 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 
Computer Science 



MARGARET PIRKINS MARGARET A. PITTS 



School of Education 
B.A. Education 



.Arts &: Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 




PAUL E. PLISSEY 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. English 



JOHN M. POLLOCK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



DAVID J. PLUNKETT 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Sociology 

Philosophy 

Communications 



DIANA M. PLUNKETT 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 
Computer Science 



KIMBERLEE A. 
POLGREEN 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



GREGORY E. POLLARD 

.Arts &: Sciences 
B.,\. Psychology 




JACQUELINE M. 
POLSELLI 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



CARA E. POMPONIO 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Romance Language 



THOMAS R. PORELL 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 

Economics 



MAURA F. PORTER 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



418 / Seniors 




KAREN E. POWER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



RACHEL M. POWER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



BONNIE J. POWERS 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



MARY E. POWERS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



STEVEN J. POWERS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 




THOMAS F. POWERS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



ANN MARIE PRATT 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



CHRISTOPHER J. 
PRATT 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Computer Science 



JOSEPH L. PREMUS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Mathematics 



LAURA J. 
PRENDERGAST 

School of Education 

B.A. English 
Secondary Education 



Seniors / 419 



MICHAEL E. 
PRENDERGAST 

Alls & Sciences 
B.A. Kconomics 



COLLEEN M. PRESTON 

Ails & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



ELIZABETH A. 
PRITCHARD 

Ans & Sciences 

B.A. Theology 

Philosophy 



ELVIRA N. PROFACI : HAZEL MAE J. PRYCE 



Ans & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



Arts & .Sciences 
B..\. Psychology 




MATTHEW J. PUGLIESE ANDREW QUAN KIMBERLY M. QUANDT MARIANNE QUERCIA PAMELA D. QUINLAN 

Ans Sc Sciences School of Management Ans & Sciences Ans &: Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications B.S. Computer Science B.S. Mathematics B.A. Psychology B.A. Political Science 

Finance 




We'll drink and dance with one hand free, and have the world so easily. And oh well 
be a sight to see, hack in the high life again. 




KRISTIN QUINN 

.-\ns &: Sciences 
B.A. English 




MATTHEW I. QUINN 

.■\ns t*i: Sciences 

B..-\. English 
Communications 



420 / Seniors 




'W^^HI 




PAUL PATRICK QUINN MARIBEL QUINONES LAURIE A. QUINT EDUARDO QUINTANA DEBRA QUINTILIANI 



Alls & Sciciuc.s 
B.A. History 



Alls it- S( iciKcs 
B.A. I'sy<li<>li)f^y 
(ioniiminitalions 



S( lloril 1)1 l-.<liu,llicill 

B.A. IlLiniaii DcvclopiMcnl 



At Is ^- St ifin rs 
IJ.A. I'sychology 



S{ lllllll III .MjlLiecllKIII 

B.S. Markcdiig 




SUSAN E. RABESA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biochemistry 



RICHARD RACANA 

School of Management 
B.S. Business Mgmt. 



RICHARD M. 
RACANELLI 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MARIA L. RACELA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



CHERYL RENEE 
RADACHOWSKY 

Aris ii: Sciences 

B..^. Computer Science 

Mathematics 




CATHERINA A. RAFFA DAVID L. RAFTERY 

School of Education Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Early Childhood B.A. History 



CYNTHIA A. RALEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



CARLOS G. RAMOS 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



STEPHEN J. RAPP 

.\rts ic Sciences 
B.,\. Political Science 




STEPHANIE A. 
RAUDONIS 

School of Education 

B.A. English 
Secondary Education 



SUZANNE M. RAYNOR 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



SHAUN B. REAL 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



JENIFER L. REARDON 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



CHRISTOPHER M. 
RECUPERO 

Arts &-• Sciences 
B.A. Psychology' 



Seniors / 421 



DANIEL R. 


SUSAN M. REDDY 


JOHN A. REDFIELD 


AIDEN J. REDMOND 


REDDINGTON 


Alls & Sciences 


Arts it S( ic-nccs 


Arls & Sciences 


Alls & ScieiKcs 


B.A. Psychology 


B.A. Mathematics 


B.A. Political Science 



B.A. Kconomics 



MARIE E. REED 

Schocil 111 .Managenienl 
B.S. Accounting 




DENNIS R. REGAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MARIANNE E. REGAN 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



CHERYL M. REHAK 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



MIMI REHAK 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 

Economics 



MARIA MARGARITA 
REICHARD 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 




JANICE E. REID 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



CHRISTINE M. REILLY 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



CHRISTOPHER D. 
REILLY 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



ELIZABETH K. REILLY 

School of Education 

B.A. Secondary Education 

Mathematics 



KENNETH W. 
REISMANN 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 




VINCENT A. RELLA CARMEN L. RENEDO JENNIFER A. RENNA 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



Alts cl: Sciences 
B.A. An History 



.\rts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



DOROTHY C. 
REYNOLDS 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketnig 



JOHN R. 
REYNOLDS. JR. 

.\ils 61; Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



422 / Seniors 



SUSAN M. REYNOLDS DENISE S. RICCIARDI NATALIE A. RICCIUTI ENZA RICERCA PAMELA G. RICHARD 



School ol Managi'iiiciil 
B.S. I'iiiante 



Arls t^- S( icru fs 

B.A. Sotiolof^y 

P.sy( holoj^y 



S( liool of Maii.igcriK-ril 

B.S. Markclinj; 

Human Rcsomxcs .Mv;iiini. 



.\l Is &: Scitliti;.s 
B.S. Biology 



.\|LS He StICIKCi 

B.S. Biology 




DEBRA A. 
RICHARDSON 

School of Management 

B.S. Computer Science 

Finance 



JOSEPH P. RICHER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 




MICHAEL J. RIDDLE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



CHRISTOPHER J. 
RIDINI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 




CATHERINE L. RIEDER CHARLES V. RIGOLI 

Arts & Sciences School of Management 

B.A. Economics B.S. Marketmg 




Seniors / 423 




MARY ELIZABETH 
RIORDAN 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



AGUSTIN E. RIOS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



ROBERT L. RIOSECO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



SUSAN RIPLEY 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



KENNETH M. RIPP 

.Arts &; Sciences 
B.S. Biolog\ 




RONALD L. RITCHIE JOSE E. RIVERA 



School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



Arts ^c Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



MAURA A. ROACH 

.\rts &: Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



JANET ROARKE 

Scliool of Etiucalion 
B..\. Elementary Education 



DIANE ROBERTS 

School of Man.igenicnt 
B.S. Business .-Xdm. 



424 / Seniors 



KATHLEEN M. 


PETER J. ROBERTS 


NORMA ROBINS 


ELIZABETH L. 


MARTHA L. ROBIN 


ROBERTS 


Alls &.• Sc icnccs 


Alls X; S( iciKcs 


ROBINSON 


S( ImhiI of NllIMII^; 


Ai ts & Sciences 


B.A. History 


H.A. Kiiglisli 


Art.s & Sciences 


li.S. Nursing 


B.A. Psychology 






B.A. Economics 






JOSE AMERICO ROCHA 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



DENNIS E. ROCHE 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Computer Science 



PATRICIA A. ROCHE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Theater Arts 
Communications 



SUSAN D. ROCHE 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



ELIZABETH A. 
ROCHFORD 

School ol Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




KATHLEEN B. ROCK 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



KATHY M. ROHAN 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



MARC A. ROLLO 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. English 

Economics 



MARY E. RONAN 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Marketing 



SARAH E. RONAN 

School of Education 
B..-\. Elementary Education 




ALFRED C. RONZONI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



CLARE M. ROONEY 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. English 



JAMES M. ROONEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



MICHAEL ROONEY 

School of Management 

B.S. Computer Science 

Finance 



GEORGE P. ROPER 

.\rts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



Seniors / 425 



E, 








21 



JILL ROSA 

School ol M.iti.i^'iiiiLiil 
B'S. (Ji-Mcial Mgnit. 



RONALD G. ROSAL MONICA M. ROSE 



Alls iV- S( iciufs 
B.A. All llislory 



Arls & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



REBECCA E. ROSE 

School ol Kducalioii 
B.A. Eleni. — Special Kclucalion 



ROBIN L. ROSE 

S( hool ol Nursing 
B..S. .Nursing 




PAUL A. ROSELLI 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



GAIL C. ROSS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



MICHELE S. ROSSI 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



JAMES J. ROTH 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



FREDRICK C. ROTTJER 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




ANNA ROUNBEHLER LISA ROWAN-GILLIS 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Computer Prog. B.A. English 



JOHN M. ROWE 

Arts 8c Sciences 
B.A. History 



BRENDA 
RUEL-SHARTON 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



ANTHONY G. RUFO 

.Arts ^- Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




VINCENT M. RUGGIERO JENIFER C. RUSH JOHN H. RUSHFORD 



School ol Management 
B.S. Finance 



,'\rls &: Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



.'\rls X: Sciences 

B.A. English 
Political Science 



ANNE E. RYAN 

.\rls i: Sciences 
B.A. PsychologN 



ANTONY PARKER 
RYAN 

Arts Jc Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 

Philosophv 



426 / Seniors 




i^ 



JEFFREY T. RYAN KATHLEEN A. RYAN 



Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Economics 



S( liddl <il Niirsiiij^ 
B.S. Nursing 



KATHLEEN M. RYAN KATHLEEN M. RYAN 

Siliiiolol l-.diK .iliuri S( liDol ol l.diu.ilioii 

15. A. Knglisli 15. A. ElcmcnUiry Education 
Sccontlai V Education 



MARK D. RYAN 

Alls & Silences 
B.A. Economics 




f^WH^t 






MARY L. RYAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



MAUREEN A. RYAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biochemistry 



PETER J. RYAN 

School of Education 

B.A. Human Development 

English 



ROBERT P. SABELLA FERIT FAIK SAHENK 

Arts & Sciences School of Management 

B.A. Philosophy B.S. General Mgmt. 




DAVID A. SALVATORE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




NANCY M. SAMMARCO 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




Those crazy nights, I do remember in my youth. I do recall those were the best times 
most of all. 



Seniors / 427 



SHELLEY A. 
SANCHIRICO 

Alls ii: Siiciiccs 

B.A. C^ompmci Science 

PsvcIidIoj^v 



DAWN M. SANDAK 

Alls it- ScioiKfS 

B.A. Economics 



MARK P. SANPHY SOBEIDA M. SANTANA 



Arts & .Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




In order to be irreplaceable one must always be different. 

— Coco Chanel 



Si liool (il M;in;igcniciil 
B.S. Miirkcling 



JOHN P. 
SANTOSUOSSO 

Scliool <il .ManagciiH-nt 
B.S. Coniputcr Science 

.■\( ( Miiniiir' 




KEVIN C. SANVILLE 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



CATHERINE C. 
SARDARI 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




FRANKLIN R. SARRA 

.Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. History 



JULIA M. SATTI 

.\rts &: Sciences 
B.S. Biology 
Psychology 




ANDREA D. SAURO JOHN D. SAVAGE 



School ot Managemeni 
B.S. Markclnig 



.Alls i; Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



428 / Seniors 



NANCY B. SAVAGE 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



NICHOLAS G. 
SCANDALIOS 

School of Managcnicnl 
U.S. Finance 



THOMAS P. SCANLON 

Alls t<.- Sciences 

li.A. Knglish 

I'hilosopliy 



KENNETH MARK 
SCHEEL 

School (}l Kflucalion 

B.A. Human Uevelopnienl 

Maihcmalics 



CHARLES A. SCHICK 

Al Is & S( KIHCS 

li.S. Biology 




^(UV;^^ 




SHARON A. SCHICK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Romance Language 



WILLIAM G. SCHIERL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Ps ychology 



KATHLEEN A. 
SCHILIRO 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



LAURIE A. SCHMAIZL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



CHRISTOPHER 
SCHMITT 

Arts X: Sciences 
B.A. English 




DEAN E. SCHNEBLE 

School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



CHERYL D. 
SCHOENFELD 

Arts & Sciences 



CHRISTINE M. 
SCHOFIELD 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MICHAEL A. 
SCHREMPP 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



KAREN F. SCHROEDER 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




KIMBERLY A. SCHROLL ANN M. SCHWARTA 



School of Education 

B.A. Human Development 

Communications 



School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



CHERYL 
SCHWEIHOFFER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



LISA M. SCIACCA 

.■\rts &: Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



DAIVD F. SCIMONE 

Arts &: Sciences 
B..A. Economics 



Seniors / 429 



.* *■ 




Ms^M 




DANIEL B. SCOTT 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 
Political Science 



^j^l 



THOMAS W. SCOTT 

School ol Maiiageincnt 

B.S. Finance 
Quantitative Analysis 



CATHLEEN SCOTTI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Economics 



WENDY A. SEELEY SHANTA E. SENGUPTA 



School of Education 
B.A. Earlv Child Ed. 



School ol Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




hi^^i^^^d^^ 



SPIROS SEREMETIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



JOHN SERENA 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



CATHLEEN LOUISE 
SERIL 

School of Manag;ement 
B.S. Marketing 



DAVID J. SERPA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



GUILLERMO J. 
SERRITIELLO 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.S. Economics 




^HM 




MARIA LOURDES 
SEVILLE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



NORMAN E. SEWELL 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. History 

Philosophy 



CHRISTOPHER 
SHACHOY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



EDWARD L. SHAFFER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



CHARLES G. 
SHAHNAIAN 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 

Finance 




STEPHEN P. 
SHANAHAN 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 

Finance 



DANIEL J. SHEA 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 

Finance 



JAMES A. SHEA 

.■\rts &■ Sciences 
B.A. History 



BEVERLY J. SHEATS 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



KATHLEEN M. 
SHEEHAN 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



430 / Seniors 




LESLIE M. SHEEHAN 

School ol Nursiiiji; 
B.S. Nursing 




JOHN J. SHELLY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Economics 




Wg laughed until we had to cry 

We loved right down to our last goodbye 

We were the best 

I think we'll ever he 

Just you and me 

For just a moment. 




ERIC T. SHERBACOW 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



JOHN G. SHERLOCK 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 

Finance 



BETHANY B. 
SHERMAN 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. English 



ELISABETH SHERMAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Economics 



AMY B. SHERTS 

Arts &; Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 




MAJkd^ 




SUSAN K. SHEY 

School of Education 
B.A. Communications 
Human Development 



PETER C. SHIELDS 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



STEVEN V. SHIELDS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



MARY M. SHIMER 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



ERIC G. SHOBER 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



Seniors / 431 



GREGORY SICARD 


SANDRA L. SIENICKI 


MATTHEW E. SIMMONS 


JULIE M. SIMONS 


T LAURA SIMONY AN 


School ol Manancincnl 
U.S. Marketing 


Alls & Sciences 
B.A. Communicalions 


Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 


School ol Kflucation 
B.A. Human Development 


Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




SUSAN J. SINGER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Romance Language 



ALINA M. SINZ 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



KYPARISSIA 
SIRINAKIS 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MIRIAM F. SITTENFELD MARITZA SKELTON 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Psychology B.A. Psychology- 




Keep smiling, keep shining, knowing you can always count on me, for sure. That's 
what friends are for. 




SHAWN J. SLATTERY 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 
General Mgint. 




SHAWN M. SLATTERY 

.-\rts S; Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



432 / Seniors 



BRIAN G. SLAYNE, JR MYRON O. SLEEPER 



Alls & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



Arls & Sciences 
B.A. History 



ERIC S. SLIFKA 

.'\its & Scieiues 
li.A. Political Science 



KEVIN SLINEY 

School ol .\t:iMii);einenl 
U.S. Accounting 



JAMIE A. SMIDA 

.Scli(K)l ol Kdiuation 
B.A. t:arlv C;hildli<MMl 




ANDREW H. SMITH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



CARRIE SMITH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



CHRISTINE M. SMITH 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



DANIEL A. SMITH 

School of Education 

B.A. Secondary Education 

English 



IRENE E. SMITH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




KATHLEEN J. SMITH 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MICHELLE R. SMITH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



PATRICIA A. SMITH 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



RENEE M. SMITH 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



SARA E. SMITH 

Arts &.- Sciences 
B.S. Economics 




SUSAN J. SMITH WILLIAM J. SMITHERS JUDE L. SMULSKY 

School of Management School of Management Arts &: Sciences 



B.S. Computer Science 



B.S. Marketmg 



B.A. Mathematics 



PATRICK SMYTH 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



AMY C. SNEERINGER 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



Seniors / 433 




-^A Mw 




STEPHEN M. SNOW 

School ol Maiuigi-iiK-iH 
B.S. Atcounting 



BETTY C. SO 

School of Maiuif^L-incnt 
B.S. Finance 



LESLIE SOLER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



SERYEON SONG 

Arts S; Sciences 
B.S. Physics 



JADE SOOHOO 

School 1)1 .Maiiaj^enieni 
B.S. .\ccounting 




^tfU 



MAN-YUM S. SOOHOO JAMES F. SORRENTO CHARLES T. SPADA 

School of Management Arts & Sciences School of Management 

B.S. Accounting B.S. Biology B.S. Finance 



KRISTIN L. SPADA 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Psychology 

Philosophy 



JOANNE C. 
SPADORCIA 

.\rts Ji: Sciences 
HA. Mathematics 




CRAIG W. SPANO 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



JEFFREY S. SPANO 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



REBECCA SPECTOR JOSEPH E. SPELLMAN 

,\rts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



."Krts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



Philosophy 



Communications 



JO-ANN SPERA 

.\rts S; Sciences 
B.A. English 




SILVANA M. SPINELLI DOUGLAS SPINK. Ill 

Arts & Sciences .Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Psychology B.A. Economics 



JENNIFER A. ST. 
GERMAIN 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



ELIZABETH STALCUP 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



STEVEN 
STAMATOPOULOS 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



434 / Seniors 



JULIE STAMOS 

Alls Sc Sciences 
B.A. ComniuiiicaUons 



TIMOTHY J. STANSKY 

Sthool ()i M;in;i^fnicnl 

B.S. Qu;irililalivf Analysis 

Maikclin^ 

Finance 




SIDNEY STAUNTON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



BRIAN F. STECKEL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biochemistry 




BRIAN W. STEEL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



JOSEPH E. STEEVES 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 




JEFFREY S. STEIN 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



LISA M. STEPAN 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



CATHERINE M. 
STANTON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. C^ommunications 



ROBERT J. STARK GEORGE S. STATHAS 

Si hoiil (j| M.iiianc-nic-nl .\fis i .Sciences 

B.S. Hinancc B.A. Economics 




Time it was, and what a time it was. A time of innocence, a 
time of confidences. 



Seniors / 435 




KATHLEEN M. 
STEPHENS 

Arls & Sticnccs 
B.A. Romance Language 



DEBORAH A. 
STERNSTEIN 

School of Education 

B.A. Severe Spec. Needs 

Psychology 



KEVIN M. STEVENS 

Alls & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



BETH A. STEVENSON 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



ELAINE STILLMAN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 
Pohtical Science 



HAROLD R. STONE ANNEMARIE C. STOUT 



Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Economics 



School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 




ELIZABETH S. 
STRICKLER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



MARLENE STRUTZ 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Marketing 



SHERRIE A. STUCKEY LYNDA J. SHUGHRUE SUSAN M. SULESKY 



.Arts Ji: Sciences 
H.A. Economics 



School ot Managcmciu 
B.S. Marketing 



School ol Education 



436 / Seniors 








^j^WV^ 



BARBARA G. SULLIVAN BRIAN C. SULLIVAN DANIEL J. SULLIVAN 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. (Communications 



Alls it SiiciKcs 
li.A. Matlu-matics 



Alts & Si iciitc-s 
li.A. History 



ELIZABETH A. 
SULLIVAN 

Arls & Sciciitcs 
B.A. Mathematics 



KAREN A. SULLIVAN 

.S( lioifl oi NiJi Mii^ 
li. S. Nursinn 




KATHLEEN A. 


KERRY A. SULLIVAN 


LINDA SULLIVAN 


LORI J. SULLIVAN 


MARK J. SULLIVAN 


SULLIVAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 


Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 


School of Management 
B.S. Business Mgmt. 


Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

Philosophy 


Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




MICHAEL P. SULLIVAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



TERRENCE SULLIVAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



THERESA N. SULLIVAN 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



PATRICIA A. 
SUMMERS 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



ANN M. SUPPLE 

.Arts ic Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




DAVID K. SUVAK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Studio Art 



BRAD T. SWEENEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



MARY E. SWEENEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



MAURA J. SWEENEY 

Stiiool of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



MEGAN B. SWEENEY 

School of Education 
B.A. Elem. — Special Education 



Seniors / 437 



KATHLEEN M. SWEET LYNN M. SYMANSKI G. MICHAEL TAHAN WILLIAM B. TALBOT - YOLANDA C. TAM 



Ails & Siicnccs 
B.S. Sociology 



SiliDol (A Man.im-iiiciU 
B.S. Marketing 



.'\rls K: Sciences 
B.A. Political .Science 



.Alls X: Sciences 
B..\. History 



.SdionI (j| M.m.i^eiiienl 
B.S. Accounting 




RITA E. TAMARGO AILEEN J. TAMAYO 



School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Psychology 



LAWRENCE J. 
TAMBASCIO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Computer Science 

Mathematics 



ANNE M. TANIN 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



STEPHANIE F. TANKI 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




J. CHRISANN TARAS 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. English 



REYNALDO G. 
TARICHE 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



STEPHEN G. TAYLOR TYRONE TAYLOR DENNIS B. TEE-KING 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



.\ns ic Sciences 
B.S. Biolog\ 




JAMES W. TELLA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



NORA TERPANJAIN 

School of Management 
B.S. Business IVIgmt. 



JACQUELINE A. 
TESSIER 

Arts S; Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



JOANNE P. TETREAULT JULIE A. THERRIAULT 



.\its i^c Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



Scluiol ot Education 
B.A. Unclassified 



438 / Seniors 



TRACEY L. THIELE 

Arts & SciciKi's 
li.A. Psythology 



ELIZABETH THISTLE GALINI THOIDIS 



Alls ^- Stifiit fs 
B.A. Coniiiiuiiitatioiis 



Alls i<: S( icim-s 
U.S. UiiHliciiiislry 



JOAN T. THOMAS MICHELE A. THOMAS 



Alls ^- S( iciii cs 
ii.A. (>>iiiiiiuiiiLatiun!> 



Alls & Siitriics 
li.A. I'sychulogy 




GUINEVERE M. 
THOMPSON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Art History 



JULIE C. THOMPSON 

Arts 8c Sciences 
B.A. English 




PATRICIA TIERNEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Romance Language 




RICHARD P. TIERNEY 

School of Management 

B.A. Finance 

Computer Science 



LESLIE THOMPSON RENEE B. THOMPSON PAMELA J. THORNTON 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences School of .Managciiicni 

B.A, English B.S. Marketing 



B.A. Communications 




Seniors / 439 



MARY K. TILL MARGARET TIMMONS MARGARET E. TIMSON ROWENA I. TINIO ■ PATRICIA TINNEY 



School ol Maiui^i'iiiciU 
B.S. Actoiintiiig 



School ol M.iiKij^criK'nl 
B.S. Maikcliiig 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Polilical Scic-iicc 



.Alls &: .Sciences 
B.S. Psychology 



School ol Kduiaiion 

B..A. Hlemcntary Kducation 

Romance Language 





GREGORY J. TOBIAS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Theology 



LAURA TOBIN 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




MARIA J. TOCCO STEPHEN A. TOLERICO 



School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




JEREMIAH J. TOOMEY ARTHUR G. TORIGIAN 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



.Arts &: Sciences 
B..\. Communications 



440 / Seniors 



CAMILLE TORONSKI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



REGINA M. TOSCA MICHAEL F. TOUHEY 



/\l !S ^- S( IC'IKC'S 

B.A. English 



S( iiooi ()1 M.iii.i^ciiifiit 
B..S. Maikc'lliig 



TERESE TRAFAS 

Sc huiil 111 |-.ilu( .inoM 
H.,\. Iliiiii.iri 1 )c-velopmt'ni 



RICHARD E. TRAINOR 

S( IiodI nl M.ill.igtMjclil 

B.S. Accounting 




LUCIA M. TREVINO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 

Political Science 



TRACEY L. TRIFARI 

School of Education 

B.A. Secondary Education 

Mathematics 



CATHERINE T. TRIFILO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



JANE C. TROMBLY 

School of Education 

B.A. Mathematics 

Secondary Education 



ELIZABETH M. TROY 

.■\rls &: Sciences 

B..-\. Psychology 

Philosophy 




CHIEH-JU TSAI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



LINDA M. TSE 

School of Management 

B.S. Computer Science 

Finance 



CHRISTIE J. TUCKER 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

Psychology 



REGAN L. TUERFF 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. Sociology 

English 



SALVATORE TUFANO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




JEANNINE H. TURENNE NICOLE S. TURILLON THOMAS A. 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences TURLEY, JR. 

B.A. Political Science B.A. Psychology Arts & Sciences 

Sociology B.A. Economics 



MARY G. TUTHILL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Romance Language 



MARYBETH TYER 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



Seniors / 441 



MELISSA M. TYRRELL CHRISTOPHER S. 

Sduiol i)t M.iM.iKL-iriLrU TZIANABOS 

U.S. Maikcling Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Ktonomics 



MARGARET M. 
UHLMAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



DAVID L. UNDERWOOD OARIO D. VACCINI 



Scliool ol Maiianc-niciil 
B.S. Accouiiliiig 



.S( fiofjl of .Maiia^emeiit 
B.S. Niarkcting 




JOANNE M. VACIRCA MARY E. VAIRO JOHN E. VALERI, JR. VICENTE M.P. VALERO CARMELA S. VALIENTE 

Arts &: Sciences School of Education Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences School of Nursing 

B.A. Mathematics B.A. Human Development B.A. Sociology B.A. Economics B.S. Nursing 
Computer Science 




ELISE T. VANETZIAN WILLIAM VANPELT 

Arts Sc Sciences School of Management 



B.A. Sociology 



B.S. Finance 
Accounting 



KAREN J. VANRIPER 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. English 



ROBERT J. PHILLIS A. VANVUGT 

VANVOLKENBURGH School of Management 

School of Management BS- Marketnig 

B.S. Accounting Psycholog\ 




INGRID M. VANZON ROXANA VASALLO SHEILA M. VAUGHAN EDWARD F. VAZQUEZ PAMELA J. VENTOLA 



Arts & .Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



School ol Maiiagemcnl 
B.S. AccoiMiting 



.\rts S; Sciences 
B.A. Studio .Vrt 



.\rts S; Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



442 / Seniors 







1 



KIM M. VENTURA 

Alls & Sc'iciR'cs 
B.A. Coniiminicatioiis 






KRISTEN VERBECK CHRISTINE VIGLIANO KRISTIN J. VINIOS VIONETTE VISSEPO 



Alls & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



S< lidol <)I M.in.i^crncnl 
li.S. liiLiiicf 



,\i Is ^- St iciu cs 
B.A. Siudio An 



.\i Is ^ Sciences 
B.A. Communicaiions 




VICTORIA A. VITALE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Philosophy 

Economics 



AMY T. VITKAUSKAS 

School of Education 

B.A. Human Development 

Communications 



JUDITH A. VOGTLE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



DONNA VOSS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ANN M. VOVAKIS 

School of .Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




AIMEE A. WALKER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



KAREN A. WALKER SIRDEANER L. WALKER ELIZABETH A. WALL JAMES P. WALSH 

School of Management Arts & Sciences School of Management 



School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



B.S. Accounting 



B.A. Communications 



B.S. Finance 




JULIE A. WALSH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



KIMBERLY D. WALSH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



JOSEPH P. WALTER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



GEMMA M. WARD 

.Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



MARY E. WARE 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



Seniors / 443 




KATHLEEN A. WARREN MICHELLE R. 

Arts & Siiciiccs WARREN 

B.A. tnglish School of Education 

B.A. F.lcnicmary Education 



PETER E. WASMER JOAN G. WATERBURY ' SHEILA S. WATTS 



Scliool ol Manaeemcnl 
B.S. Marlicting 



School (jl Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



.Arts S: .Si icnces 

B..-\. Economics 

Philosophy 




STEVEN A. WAXMAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



DONNA L. WAYMAN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 
Political Science 



LISA A. WEBER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



CAROL A. WEGMAN 

School of Education 

B.A. Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 



MARY E. WEIBEL 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




ROBERT J. WEINER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ANNE WEINSTEIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



STEVEN T. WELCH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



LAURA WELDON 

Arts S; Sciences 
B.S. Biochemistry 



COLIN P.J. WELLS 

Arts S: Sciences 
B.A. English 




SUSAN G. WENGER CECILIA D. WENTZEL JEANETTE M. WENZKE JOHN J. WERNER 



School ol Education 



Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. English 

Germanic Studies 



School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



.-\rts t<.- Sciences 
B..\. Political Science 



KAREN J. 
WESOLOWSKI 

Arts &: Sciences 
B..\. Romance Language 



444 / Seniors 




PAUL WESTERKAMP 

Arts X: Scic'iucs 
U.A. S()(ii)li)gy 




BRENDAN WHALEN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 




Always look forward, for excitement lies in tomorrow. 

— Natalia Makarova 




CAROLINE S. WHEELER GREGORY A. WHITE MICHAEL G. WHITE 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



WILLIAM H. WHITE JUSTIN J. WHITLOCK 

School of Management .Arts &: Sciences 

B.S. General Mgmt. B..A. English 




DAVID S. WHYTE 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



DAVID H. WIDELL 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



RICHARD A. WIELAND 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



JOAN WILEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



LAURA M. WILLIAMS 

School of Education 
B..A. Human Development 



Seniors / 445 



MICHAEL Q. WILLIAMS SCOTT D. WILLIAMS SHONII T. WILLIAMS STEPHEN J. WILLIAMS MICHAEL A. WILSON 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



School ol Kdiualion 

B.A. Human Development 

Communications 



Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 
Political Science 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




LINDA M. WINDERL 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



SUSAN M. WINFIELD 

Arts 8c Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



JANE WINKEL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ADAM B. WINKLER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ERIC WISE 

School of Management 
B.S. General Mgmt. 





CHRISTINE G. 
WISLEDER 

School of Management 

B.S^ Marketmg 

Human Resources Mgmnt. 




VALERIE WITTEK 

.\rts &: Sciences 
B..\. Romance Language 



446 / Seniors 



STEPHANIE C. 
WOERNER 

School ol MaiiagcmciU 

B.S. Oomputcr Science 

Accountiiif; 



CHRISTOPHER J. 
WOLKOWICZ 

Alls & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



CATHERINE E. WOOD 

.Alls X: Sciences 
B.A. K.iiK'lish 



NANCY L. 
WOODHOUSE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



BRENDA L. WOODING 

St huol ol .Manaucninti 
B.S. Marketing 




JANET L. WOODKA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



ELIZABETH WOODS 

School of Education 
B.A. Moderate Special Needs 



LESLIE J. WRIXON 

Arts 8c Sciences 

B.A. Communications 

English 



JEFFREY G. WYMAN 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. History 



WENDY E. WYRWA 

School ol Education 
B.A. Elenieniarv Education 




KIMBERLY M. WYSON 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



RUTH YANG 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



DARLENE VANKOWSKI KATHRYN L. YATES 

Arts & Sciences Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. English B.A. Communications 



VICTORIA L. YATES 

.Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




MINA YAZDANIAN 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Marketing 



CAROLINE B. YEE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Romance Language 



THOMAS W. YEE 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



ANI M. YESSAILLIAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



STEPHEN E. YOCH 

.Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 
Political Science 



Seniors / 447 



JOHN P. YOUNG 


CHRISTINE G. YU 


ROBERTO 


JEFFREY S. ZDUNCZYK ' 


DAVID R. ZENGA 


Alls & Sciences 


Ans t^v: Scieiues 


ZACCARDELLI 


Arts & .Sciences 


School of Management 


B.A. Kconoiiiics 


li.S. Biology 


Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

Philosophy 


B.A. History 


B.S. Marketing 




MARY W. ZINITI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



JOHN T. ZOGBY 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. History 



HORACE J. ZONA, III 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. English 

Economics 



MICHELE A. ZONA KATHLEEN ZORTMAN 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 

Finance 




Ti7ne — our youth 



it never really goes, does it? It is all held in our minds. 

— Helen Hooven Santmeyer 



448 / Seniors 



Seniors / 449 



INDEX 



Academics — 262 

After Hours — 250 

Air Band — 248 

All Nighters — 238 

Bopst — 264 

Band — 156 

Basketball, Mens — 108 

Basketball, Womens — 104 

Boston — 16 

Boston College — 36 

Bruskiewitz, Lenny — 194 

Busses — 244 

Callahian, Chiristina — 196 

Career Center — 274 

Cheerleaders — 160 

Ctiristmas — 232 

Clar1<, J.R. — 190 

Classes — 226 

Cleveland Circle — 224 

Clinical — 276 

Computers — 272 

Cross Country, Men's — 100 

Cross Country Women's — 98 

Current Events — 48-61 

Dance Ensemble — 138 

Dowling, Kerry — 188 

Drama, mainstage — 168 

Drama, second season — 174 

Drinking Games — 240 

Dustbov\/l — 218 

Eating — 204 

Exams — 284 

Fall — 222 

Field Hockey — 94 

Fleabag — 148 

Football — 66 

Giambanco, Peter — 198 

Going Home — 234 

Golf — 82 

Haiti — 164 

Halloween — 220 

Heights — 152 

Hockey, men — 124 

Hockey, v^/omen — 122 

Homecoming — 214 

Houses — 256 



I.D.'s — 258 

Indoor Track, men — 132 

Indoor Track, women — 130 

Internships — 278 

In the In-between — 246 

Jesuits — 270 

Jobs — 208 

Junior year abroad — 282 

Keene, Joan — • 192 

Monan, Father Donald — 286 

Murphy, Pat — 186 

O'Brien, Jim — 136 

O'Neill — 266 

Opening — 1-15 

Perspectives — 180 

Professors — 268 

Rat — 166 

Red Tape — 236 

Regatta — 216 

Roomates — 260 

Rugby, men's — 90 

Rugby, women's — 88 

Sailing — 80 

Seniors — 316-449 

Soccer, men's — 76 

Soccer, women's — 72 

Skiing — 134 

Student teaching — 280 

Study habits — 212 

Swimming, men's — 118 

Swimming, women's — 114 

Spring Break — 254 

Table of Contents — 16-17 

Tailgating — 210 

Tempest — 170 

Tennis, men's — 86 

Tennis, women's — 84 

Theme Parties — 202 

UGBC — 150 

Valentines Day — 252 

Volleyball — 92 

Walking — 228 

Water polo — 120 

Winter — 230 

Wrestling — 102 

WZBC — 144 



COLOPHON 

The 1987 edition of Sub Turri is the 75th 
volume of the book, with a press run of 2100 
copies printed in April 1987 by Hunter Publish- 
ing Company of Winston-Salem, North 
Carolina using offset lithography process. 
Publishing representative was Arnold 
Lohmann. The cover has been embossed 
with a gold, metal applique with a spot rub. 
Gold mylar process was applied to all em- 
bossed lettering on both front lid and spine. 
The cover was designed by Christopher H. 
Botelho and Mimi Rehak. The Boston College 
Seal is duplicated from the cover of Sub Turri 
1979. The endsheets are 651b. cover weight, 
tinted, stock #111, Lively Ivory. The design that 
appears on the front endsheet was drawn by 
our Layout Editor, Annamarie McMahon, and 
was printed using special PMS maroon ink. 
The majority of the paper used in this book 
was 801b. text weight dull paper stock with 
the exception of Boston section which was 
printed on 1001b. lustro color text stock. All 
color photographs were printed from color 
transparency separation. Primar/ typeface is 
Avant Book, with the senior names in Souvenir 
Medium. Times Roman was used to add 
authenticity to newspaper — format layouts. 
The student life section was allowed more 
reign in choosing spot colors and typestyles. 
Portraiture for the senior secture was primarily 
dcrie by Harold Dodge of YeartDook Associates, 
Millers Falls, Ma. Portraiture for the Per- 
spectives section was done by Geoff Why, 
Photography Editor, Sub Turri 1987. 

Many thanks, as always, to Mom, Dad, 
Stephen,, and Susan; B. Blaney, K. Johnson, S. 
Oliver; to Father Monan, Kerstin Gnazzo, The 
Heights, OSPAR; Amie Lohmann, Tracy Holtz- 
man, and Hunter Publishing; Ed Ralicki, 
Harold Dodge, and Yearbook Associates; 
1987 Patrons, Benefactors, Advertisers; and 
the Class of 1987. 

Copyright by the 1987 Sub Turri, the Year- 
book of Boston College, 
Christopher H. Botelho, Editor-in-Chief. 



450 / Index / Colophon 



IN MEMORIUM 




Father Leo J. McGovern S.J. 

Advisor. 
Friend. 



Memorium / 451 



Organizations 




Alpha Sigma Nu 

LEFT TO RIGHT: Leslie Thompson (President), Robert J. Cheney SJ (Advisof) 




Bellaimlne Low Academy 

LEFT TO RIGHT: Margaret Pechilio. Fr. Mohoney (Ivloderator). Timothy Flaherty 



Campus Cnisade lor Christ 

LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOt\/l ROW: Gail Bough. Lynmarie Rittger (Exec- Coordinator). Ruth Yang (Pres ]. Bill Talbot. 
Karl Lee 1st ROW: Kelly Ann Ryan. Suzanne O'Fiarrell. Ivllchael Formichelli 2nd ROW: Groce lyicKinnon. Ellen 
Talsky. Nancy Gonella 3rd ROW: Horry Ofaguro. Linda Nictrals. Daisy TTxxougtigood. Sophy Keo 4th ROW: 
Lynne Bercaw. Hannah Goon. Marty McComber. Bobbie LeViness 5th ROW: Ian Cotonite. Andre Wu. Pete 
LeViness 




Computer Science Academy 

LEFT TO RIGHT Joyce Kimtxjll (Secretary). John E. Hatem (Vice President). Philip Cooper (President) - 
Hoskins (Treasurer. r»t In ptioto) 



Him Board 

LER TO RIGHT: BOTTOM ROW: Susan Benoit. Lorraine Haley (Secretary). Joyce Kimball. Meg Fitzpatrick 
(Chairperson) TOP ROW: Joe Gesmundo (Organization Co-ordinator). Lisa Fucile (Treosurer). Kelly Alieme. 
Patricio Dentremont. Joseph R. Kolinski (fylembership Director) 



452 / Organizations 




Hnance Academy 

LEFT TO RIGHT: Kathle Horrigan (President), Karlm Kawar (Treasurer), — Not available for photo: G. Scott Gibson 
(Vice President), Cottiy Burgess (Secretary), Tom Downs (Faculty Moderator) 



Gold Key Society 

LEFT TO tJIGHT: BOTTOM ROW: Dave Conrad (Asst, to Secunty), Irene Melville (Exec, Vice President), Mak 
Froncesconi (President), Mary Gallagtier (Sopti. Representative) MIDDLE ROW: Susonne Dilco, Mary Ellen 
Long (Sopfi, Rep), Bemadette Bruno, Lisa Fuclle TOP ROW: Ken Karon. Poul Andrews (Servjtor). Polo 
Abbonizio (Treasurer), Larry Tombascio, Vytoutas Jurgela (Seaetory) 




Hellenic Society 

LEFT TO RIGHT: Jotin Vardls (President). George Lambrou (Vice President) — not available for ptioto: Nick 
Lombios (Secretary), Steptianie Callas (Special Events), Ctiristos Stamatos (Treasurer) 



Invertment Club 

LEFT TO RIGHT: BOnOM ROW: Ron Gendron, Bob Lum (President), Pom Lindgren. Connie Caroloze MIDDLE 
ROW: Zandra Sherrington, Thomas Quinn. Michael Leonard, Keitti J, Longson TOP ROW, Madeline 
Claushuis, Dawn Aiello, Harvey Felman 




MarketliM Academy 

LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM ROW: Kathy Desmond (Treasurer), Sheila Gorman (President), Andrea Bianchi 
(Secretary) TOP ROW: Tina Emanuel fChair. Social Comm.), Kim Machado (Chair, Seminar Comm.), Kim Wyson 
(Chair. Career Night and Advert.). I<athleen Zortman (Chair. Fundraising Comm.) 



MASSPRIG 

LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM ROW: Bernard Gallaagher, Mary Briody, Mary Guerrero. Laurisa Atanorosky 
MIDDOW ROW: Lori Caatollozzi (Staff Advisor). Leigh Anthony (Clerk), Susie Sonnebom (Treasurer), Dan 
Esposito, Grace McKlnnon, Jennifer Camino. Jeanne M. Hegner TOP ROW: Dan Sandman, Tom Mucker 
(Chpt. Chairperson), Patti Crisafulli (State Board Rep). Geoffrey Smith (State Board Rep), Roger Willson. 
Maggie Flood, Roon Hebshie, Brendan Conway 



Organizations / 453 




Mendel Club Middle Eastern Club 

LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM ROW: Jill Hendrzak, George Nasser (Vice Pres.), Richard J. Maguire (Pres), Ghandi LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM ROW: MIna Yazoanlon (Treasurer), Samar Sousou (Secretary). Lumo Halazon (Newslet- 
M, Moussa (Secrelarv), Shawn M. Slattery (Caretaker) TOP ROW: Luis Caneiro, Philip Ginccchiaro, Mike ter), Isabelle GarbanI (Social CommJ MIDDLE ROW: Dimitri Corey (Academic Comm), Lutol Awdeh (Vice 
Berarduccl. Edward P.D.W. Barry, Kent G. Cloud, Phillip A, Pike Pres). Karim Kawar (Pres.) TOP ROW: Paotrick Zlmmermann (Sports Coor.), Hassan ShoborshI (Public RelotKms 

Chair.) 




Musical Guild Murray House 

LEFT TO RIGHT: Nick Scandalios (Treasurer). Laura Barlos (Secretary). MIcheie Ttiomas (Pres.) — not avail- LEFT TO RIGHT: Joe Walter. John DesRoches. Ellen Heavey 
able for photo: Lisa Miyoshira (vice Pres.). Kevin Sanville (Program Director) 




Nuraing Senate Observer 

LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM ROW: Marttia Roblnoon. Karen Murray. Mary Betti Hirsch, Sheila McCarthy, LEn TO RIGHT: BOTTOM ROW: Jeffrey Eost (Managing Edit), Joseph Mcl^obb (Publistierl, Stephen Tomaseili 

Klmberty Kelly, Nancy Sammarco, Krista Durant TOP ROW: Christine Pope. Kim Owens. Kate Zimmerman. (Bulsn. Edit). Jonathan MacLean (Sport Edit.J. Eilse H Saiek (Editor). Katie Conion TOP ROW: Frank Sorra 

Kottiy MICuilough. Kim Mar1<ey. Leslie Peitz. Valerie Sioras. Lynmarie RIttger. Gretchen Berkowltch. Sharon [Photographer). Slivestre Fontes (Ass. Sports Edit.) — not available for ptX)to: Cindy Hill (Layout Mgr). Lisa 

Harrington Evangellsta (Advertising) 

454 / Organizations 




O'Connell House 

LEFT TO RIGHT: Marie Murphy (1st Lady of Crime), Paui PatTicl< Tremer ili ("Busted"), Mary Betti Martin ( Assauit & 
Battery with a Dead Squlrrei), Mart<us J.J. Necl<ermann (Macro Biotic Arson, MBA). Karen Bronctietti (Breal<ing 
and Entering — Federoi Offense) 



' O.I.S.A. 

LEFT TO RiGHT: BOnOM ROW: Arthur DortX-i' ■ 
ROW: Pablo Liodo. Mariri Occhl. Paul Pacht-iL. 



Jrutz, Jovlef Moflca. Aniorteto MoncMI TOP 

ombfou. Claudia Gaitan 




O.LA. 

LEFTTO RIGHT: BOTTOM ROW: Stephen T. Miilan (Publicity Chief), Andres M. Romero (Vice Pres.), Loma M. Colon 
(Pres.), Daniel Velez (Sociel Coord.) TOP ROW: Christine J. Kilduff (Secretary) — not available tor photo: Roxana 
Vasallo (Treasurer) 



Paraprofesslonal Leadership Group 

LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM ROW: Margie Zoiive. Jeffrey King. Karen Sullivan. Maribal Quinor>es. Sandy Jonks. 
John Rushford, Mory Kenny. Dorothy Kukfo MIDDLE ROW: Stephen Fenuci. Angelo Jennings. Donno May 
Graham, Dessy Legates, Larie Mott, Christine Potter. Virginia Rit>eiro. Mindy Oliver. Brendo McDorxxjgh, 
Gregory Pollard, Elizabeth Robinson. Kothy Depies. Rosemane LoFleur TOP ROW: Denise Ricciardi. Step- 
hanie Raudonis, Kothleen McCall, Koren Maskara, Claire Luttmer, Dovid Degeorge, Daniel Sfiea, Rob 
Andrews, James Hurley, Patrick Delaney. Jeff Card 




Political Science Association 

LEFT TO RIGHT; Susan Roche. Margaret Pechilio, Gemma Ward 



Som Senate 



Organizations / 455 



BENEFACTORS 

As Sub Turri is an organization independent from the University, we receive 
neittier University funds nor a portion of the activity fee to defray production 
costs. Therefore, the staff of Sub Turri would lil<e to extend its gratitude to 
parents, friends, faculty members and alumnae who generously contrib- 
uted to the 1987 edition of Sub Turri. 



456 / Patrons 



GOLD BENEFACTORS 

Dr. 8c Mrs. Stuart W. Anken 

Joe Arriola 

Mr. Bruce A. 8c Mrs. Virginia M. Barry 

Carl 8c Peter Barry 

Elisa B. Bautista 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Anthony J. Bertolino 

Mr. 8c Mrs. E. Peter Bouclnard 

Mr. 8c Mrs. John G. Breen 

Mr. 8c Mrs. John V. Brennan 

Drs. Jose 8c Pros Cabezon 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Thomas J. Cashman 

Dr. 8c Mrs. Nicholas J. Christ 

Dr. 8c Mrs. Dean Crocker 

Dr. 8c Mrs. Jack H. Dadaian 

Mr. 8c Mrs Fred M. Dellorfano, Jr. 

Mr. 8c Mrs. John L. Dentzer 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Daniel J. Doherty 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Peter Brown Dolan 

Paul J. 8c Nancy H. Drago 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Don Drew 

Mr. 8c Mrs. John F. FarrelL Jr. 

Dr. 8c Mrs. Carlos A. Garcia 

Dr. 8c Mrs. Nicholas J. Garritano 

John Gehl 

Paul J. Gross, Inc. 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Halim A. Habib 

Dr. 8c Mrs. Edward Hallisey 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Edward J. Harkins 

Mr. 8c Mrs. John Adam Hillenbrand II 

W. Drew Hoffman 

Joan 8c Richard Horan 

Mr. 8c Mrs. James E. Keegan 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Robert Kirchner 



Edwin F. Langhenry 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Edward C, Latek 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Harold R. Lifvendahl 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Rosario Limone 

Leo 8c Connie Linbeck 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Eugene H. Lorden, Jr. 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Louis P. Massaro, Jr. 

Mr. 8c Mrs. J.R. McDougall 

Mr. 8c Mrs. George A. McLaughlin 

Anne 8c Duke McMahon 

Mr. 8c Mrs. John A. McNeice, Jr. 

Dr. 8c Mrs. Francis X. Meehan 

Mr. 8c Mrs. J.A. Morano 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Giles E. Mosher, Jr. 

Charles F. 8c Anita R. Murphy 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Thomas L. Nordlinger 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Norbert C. Nyhan, Jr. 

Dr. 8c Mrs. Gaudencio S. Obial 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Bernard W. Odoy 

George 8c Alicia OToole 

Mr. 8c Mrs. James W. Quinn 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Martin J. Racanelli 

John R. 8c Anna-Mary L Riley .8c Family 

Senator Phillip J. Rock 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Alfred C. Ronzoni 

Mrs. Barbara Sanchez 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Norman J. Shachoy 

John 8c Catherine Shea 

William Sitar 

Fred 8c Gilda Slifka 

Mr. 8c Mrs. David Watson Smith 

Mr. 8c Mrs. John R. Strachan 

Tom 8c Joy Tierney 
Mr. 8c Mrs. James J. Tinney 

William J. Voute 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Pedro E. Wasmer 

Mr. 8c Mrs. J. Wayne Wheeler 

Charles G. Woram 



Patrons / 457 



SILVER BENEFACTORS 

Albert 8c Patricia Brackley 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Brian P. Burns 

Norma 8c Gordon Busching 

Maryann 8c Dennis DeLucia 

Brian J. Farrell, Law '66 

Roland 8c Kay Garneau 

M. Frank Higgins '57 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Raymond C. Holland 

The David lies Family 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Daniel Mahedy, Jr. 

Carlos M. Maldonado 

Alicia Martin 

Dr. 8c Mrs. Raymond McCaffrey 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Patrick G. McKeever 

Mr. 8c Mrs. John H. Monahan 

Mr. 8c Mrs. David R. Perkins 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Richard G. Phillips 

Dr. 8c Mrs. Salvatore J. Recupero 

George 8c Zee Sirinakis 

Drs. Plaridel 8c Ofelia Tee King 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Thomas A. Turley 



458 / Patrons 



PATRONS 

Mr. & Mrs. Munir Abu-Haidar 

Mr. & Mrs. Gustavo Acosta 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph T. Afflitto, Sr. 

Jose Almeida, M.D. 

Carmen & Modesto Alonso 

Mr. James & Mrs. Norma Alvarez 

Mr. &. Mrs. James R. Alvord 

Mr. & Mrs. Steptien Anderson 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Andrews, Sr, 

Dr. & Mrs. Joseph Robert Anthony 

Mr. & Mrs. Phillip Anthony 

Vincent &. Lenora Antignani 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Arbisi 

Dr. & Mrs. Alfred F. Arcieri 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael F. Austin 

Sedat M. Ayata, M.D. 

Dr. & Mrs. Jose G. Bacallao 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Baggett 

Robert &. Diane Baker 

Mr. & Mrs. James V. Barilaro 

Mr. & Mrs. Ronald R. Barlow 

Roger & Dee Barous 

Mr, & Mrs. J. Fernando Banrueta 

Joan Baulos 

Mr. & Mrs. John R. Bayliss 

Mr. & Mrs. Rene C. Beauchemin 

Charles & Marie Beagan 

Mr. & Mrs. John Belasco 

Mr, & Mrs. Norman Belliveau 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Benedetti 

Mr. & Mrs. David Bennett 

Mr. & Mrs. Bennie R. Berardi 

Norman & Joyce Beretta 

Raphael Beriro 

Marianne Bielinski 

Louis &. Jeanne Billera 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond R. Bilodeau 

Paul Birmingham 

Roland & Priscilla Blier 

Mr. &. Mrs. Larry K. Boe 

Joanne P. Boiardi 

Mrs. Andrew Bombara & Bob 

Dr. & Mrs. R.J. Bortnick 

John & Claudia Bosack 

Mr. & Mrs. Louis C. Bosco, Jr. 

Jim & Terry Bowler 

Terry & Barbara Breiding 

Marie & Peter Breingan 

Mr. &. Mrs. Donald P. Brennan 

Mr. &. Mrs. Thomas A. Brennan, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Leo J. Breslin 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles W. Bresnahan 

Pat Brigande 

F.X. Bnjton, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Enrique D. Buenviaje 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis M. Bums 

Daniel D. Button 

Luis J. Caballero 

Dr. & Mrs. Gustavo Calderon 



: 



Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Calefoti 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles P. Callaghan 

James & Nancy Callahan 

Dr. & Mrs. Michael R. Camino 

Mr. Anthony J. Caracciolo 

Gene & Mary Carey 

Dr. & Mrs. Joseph T. Carey 

Mr. & Mrs, Pete Carrozza 

Mr. & Mrs. Barry J. Carroll 

Mr. & Mrs. J.F. Caruso 

Dr, & Mrs, Louis A, Casale 

Mr. & Mrs. Matthew Casamassima 

Mr. & Mrs. Arthur F. Casavant 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph F, Castaldi 

Dr, & Mrs, Santo Cataudella 

Mr, & Mrs, Greg J. Catenza 

Mr, & Mrs, Robert J, Cavanaugh 

Michael & Catherine Chrismer 

Lillian & Jack Clopeck 

John & Mary Cogavin 

Sandy & Frank Colangelo 

Mr, & Mrs, Richard M, Colley 

Mr, &. Mrs, John J, Conroy, Fr, 

Mr, & Mrs, Stephen R, Cooney 

Macy G, Cooper 

Dr, & Mrs, John J, Corcoran 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Cosgrove 

Mrs. John I. Coster 

Mr. &. Mrs. George E Cote 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis J. Crane 

Margaret E. Crehan 
Mr. & Mrs. Timothy H. Cronin 
Mr. & Mrs. James L. Cummings 
Mr. & Mrs. Anthony J. Cuomo 
Dr. Joseph A. Cuozzo 
Mr. &. Mrs. J. Stan Curran 
Dr. & Mrs. John Cywinski 
Mr. &. Mrs. William C. Dailey 
Mr. & Mrs. P.G. Danis, Jr. 
Ed & Judy Daudelin 
Peter & Susan DeGirolamo 
Mr. & Mrs. William J. Delayo 
Dr. &, Mrs. Salvatore A. DeLuca 
Mr. & Mrs. James L. DeLucia, Jr. 
Dr. &. Mrs. P.J. DelVecchio 
Janet & Rudy Demasi 
Mr, & Mrs, John F, Dempsey 
Mr, & Mrs, Arthur E, Dentremont 
Mr, &. Mrs, Paul A, DeWinter 
Mr. & Mrs. Bowen S. Dieterle 
Mr. & Mrs. Gonzalo C. Docal 
Mr. &. Mrs. Robert K. Doherty 
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas H. Dolan, Jr. 
Mr. & Mrs. Harry C. Dombrowski 
Mr. &. Mrs. James C. Donahue 
Raymond J. Donahue 
Mr. & Mrs. Richard Donofrio 
Mr. & Mrs. William A. Donovan 
Mrs. John W. Dooley 
Eugene & Helen Dorsi 



Patrons / 459 



: 



Mr. &. Mrs, Joseph J. Dow 

Mr. & Mrs. Jack H. Doyle 

Mr. & Mrs. John T. Driscoll 

Barbara & Robert Duffy 

James L. & Marguerite Giles Durkin 

John & Theresa Dwyer 

Mr. & Mrs. Forrest A. Eaton 

John & Hilary Edmondson 

Mr. & Mrs. Edmund M. Erickson 

Bonnie Kay Essman 

Mr. & Mrs. Daniel P. Fabrizio 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael P. Fare 

Phillip W. Farmer 

Neal &. Barbara Farrell 

Bob & Arlene Fatovic 

Nancy Cartnick Fay 

Mr. & Mrs. Gilbert H. Feldman 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis J. Felix 

Vincente J. Fernandez 

Mr. & Mrs. Ferrer! 

Mr. & Mrs. William Fidanza 

Mr. & Mrs. William B. Finneran 

Mr. & Mrs. Calvin D. Fish 

Kathleen Fitzmaurice 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard B. Fitzpatrick 

Dr. & Mrs. George Flood 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Flynn 

Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Frigerio 

Gerald & Ellen Frost 

Dr. & Mrs. Antonio C. Gallon 

Robert & Joan Gallagher 

Ed & Carmen Gamalinda 

Garret Family 

Mr. & Mrs. John Gavin 

Dr. & Mrs. Frederick L. Geary 

Dr. & Mrs. Gerald Geisler 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard Gendron 

Dr. &, Mrs. J.M. Gerend 

Melina Gerosa 

Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth A. Gerstyle 

Mary A. Gervais 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Bernard J. Gillon, Jr. 

Mrs. Barbara A. Gindhort 

Kenneth & Kaye Gnazzo 

Betty & Joe Goldberg 

Dr. & Mrs. Severino G. Gomillo 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry Gonzalez, Jr. 

Mr. &. Mrs. Wm. Goodwin 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul Goon 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph B. Gora and Sons 

Edward Gormley 

Lorraine & Bob Graham, '61 

Mr. & Mrs. Harold O. Grant 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph P. Grant 

John & Carol Greeley 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter Grewe, Jr. 

Dr. &. Mrs. John F. Griffin 

Eugene &. Virginia Grimm 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard Grizzetti 

Margie & Allan Grody 



: 



Mr. & Mrs. Charles J. Groppe 

Frank Grupski 

Louise M. Gudelis 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard Guerini 

Margo & Dan Guzowski 

Dr. & Mrs. F.A. Habra 

Mr. & Mrs. Alfred L. Haffner, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. John G. Hall 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Brooke Hamilton, III 

Robert &. Patricia Hannon 

Mr. & Mrs. John T. Hdmgy 

Mr. & Mrs. William J. Harrington 

Dr. H.A. Haser 

Mr. &. Mrs. Timothy Hayes 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas E. Healy 

Mr. & Mrs. Patrick A. Heffeman 

Thomas G. Hellgeth 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward Hendrzak 

Mr. & Mrs. John J.C. Herlihy 

Mr. &. Mrs. John A. Hemandis 

Barbara F. Hickey 

Mr. &. Mrs. B. Albert Higgins 

James F. Higgins 

Jane Y. Hill 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert T.J. Hirsch 

Mr. & Mrs. John R. Hoffman 

Mr. &. Mrs. John J. Hogan 

Mr. & Mrs. James E. Honan 

Mr. & Mrs. William J. Horrigan 

Mr. &. Mrs. Peter D. Howley 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward J. Hughes 

Mr. & Mrs. William Hyland 

Mr. & Mrs. E. William lovanne 

Dr. & Mrs. Lawrence Jacobs 

Frank & Sylvia Jakubowicz 

Dianne & Daniel James 

Dr. & Mrs. Gerald J. Jeffry 

Warren Jeppeson 

Mr. 8f. Mrs. Warren W. Johnson 

Mr. & Mrs. Kennth F. Joyce 

Thomas & Mary Joyce 

Mr. &. Mrs. Vytautas Jurgela 

Dr. &. Mrs. James R. Kanski 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul Kanzler 

Dr. & Mrs. James J. Karo 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas E. Karpick 

Michael & Catherine Keating 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis J. Keefe 

Mr. &. Mrs. Robert J. Kelley 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph B. Kelly, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert F. Kelly 

Mr. &. Mrs. Thomas C. Kelly 

William & Pauline Kelly 

Mr. & Mrs. John G. Kenney 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond J. Kenney, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. John Keohane 

The Keman Family 

Mr. & Mrs. John F. Kidwell 

Mrs. Dianne Killeen 

Michael D. Kinsella 



460 / Patrons 



Mr. & Mrs. John D. Kinville 

Mr. &. Mrs. Paul A. Kiritsy 

Dr. & Mrs. John A. Kline 

Bernie &, Judy Kole 

John & Rosemary Kowalski 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard F. Krai 

Dr. & Mrs. Peter T. Krenicky 

Mr. & Mrs. Kari A. Kreshpane 

John C. Kudzma 
Dr. & Mrs. Stephen R. Kuhnel 

Dr. Ik-Whan Kwon 

Salvatore &, Virginia LaBella 

Dr. & Mrs. Ralph D. Loch 

Mr. & Mrs. Edmund Ladendorff, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Lapierre 

Mr. &. Mrs. V.S. Laramie 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert K. Larkins 

Mr. & Mrs. Louis LaRocco 

Craig & Madeline Larson 

Nancy A. Lavash 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael A. Lavey 

Tom 8c Nancy Lavin 

Mr. &. Mrs. Robert A. Leingang 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles C. Leonard 

Dr. & Mrs. David L. Levy 

Max &. Cathy LidI 

Mr. & Mrs. Costas Linardos 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph R. Linnehan 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert B. Lochrie, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. John M. Long 

Joan & Bob Louth 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert W. Lowe 

Francis E. & Maureen Lynch 

Dr. & Mrs. Richard A. Mackey 

Mr. & Mrs, William A. Maguire 

Mr. & Mrs. Al J. Maiolo 

Mr. &. Mrs. Frank J. Moloney 

Mr. & Mrs. E. John Manca 

Mr. & Mrs. James J. Manfieid, Jr. 

Mr. &. Mrs. Thomas D. Manning 

Mr. & Mrs. John F. Mannix 

Michael & Patricia Marco 

Sharon Marques 

Barbara J. Marran 

Mr. & Mrs. Edv\/ard Martel 

Mrs. John S. Marten 

Dr. & Mrs, R. Matteucci 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas B. McCabe, Jr. 

Cathleen & John McCarthy 

Michael B. McCarthy 

Mr. & Mrs. Herbert N. McCauley 

Mr. & Mrs. A. R. McDevitt, Jr. 
The Family of Brian R. McDonald 

Ed & Dot McDonald '42 

Mr. & Mrs. Edv\/ard J. McDonald, Jr. 

Lisa M. McDonald 

Richard & Teresa McDonnel 

Mr. & Mrs. William G. McGagh 

Elizabeth & Eugene D. McGahren 

Joseph L, McGavick 



: 



Dr. & Mrs. Edward M. McGinley 

James & Sheila McGinn 

Mr & Mrs. Joseph D. McGuire 

Mr. & Mrs. Louis T. McKenzie 

Mr. & Mrs. John B. McKinnon 

Mr, & Mrs. Daniel J. McLaughlin 

Mr, & Mrs, John & Alyce McLauglin 

Mr. & Mrs. Frederick R. McNomara 

John & Mary McNeill 

Mr. & Mrs, Fredrick S, Meils 

Mr, & Mrs. Arthur Mella 

Mr, & Mrs. William P, Melville 

Veena Merchant 

Mr. & Mrs. Messia 

Alfred Metellus 

Fritz R, Michel 

Mr, & Mrs, Edward J. Miller 

John M. Mingione 

Mr. &. Mrs. Susumu Miyashiro 

Michael M. Moheet 

Mr & Mrs. Molloy 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry J, Monaco 

Jeanne Montenegro 

Mr & Mrs, Thomas J, Moody 

Mr. & Mrs. James J. Moron 

Dr. &. Mrs. Vincent J. Moriorty 

Mr. & Mrs. William Penn Mott 

Ray & Janis Mouton 

Timothy & Claire Mo/nihan 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert W. Murphy 

Tom & Charlotte Murphy 

Mr. & Mrs. Harry L. Murray 

Mr. & Mrs. John T. Murray, Jr. 

L. & V. Murray 

Frank Myers 

F.A. Neelon 

Mr. &. Mrs. Arc Nersesian 

Mar/ M. Neville 

Timothy F. Nevils 

Mr. & Mrs. James A. Nolen, ill 

Russell L. Noll, Jr. 

Marjorie D. Noonan 

Mr. & Mrs. A. Dale Norman 

Mrs. Sandra Jean Norton 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph F. Nugent 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas H. O'Brien 

Mrs. Elizabeth A. O'Connor 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. O'Connor, III 

Mr. &. Mrs. John O'Leary 

The Raymond J. Omerza Family 

Mr. & Mrs. William O'Neill, Jr. 

Mrs. W. J. O'Sullivan, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. William Owen, Jr. 

Mr. &. Mrs. James J, Owens, III 

Mr. &. Mrs. Nicholas Pacella 

Warren C. Page 

R.G. & J.M. Parsons 

Mr. & Mrs. Alfred N. Paul 

Carol & Raymond Pekock 

Joseph R. Pelletier 



Patrons / 461 



: 



LTC &. Mrs. Paul A. Pelletier 

Jane &. Arthur Perley 

Mr, & Mrs. Leonard J. Phillips 

Mr, & Mrs. P.J. Pick 

John F. & Mary E. Pickett, '51, '55 

Mr. & Mrs. Mathew S. Piechota 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard J. Pineau 

M.L. Bud Pratt 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph J. Prendergast 

Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Principe 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert F. Pugliese 

Dr. & Mrs. John K. Quinlivan 

Mr, & Mrs, Eugene J, Quinn 

Mr. & Mrs. Carl M. Racuya 

Mr, & Mrs. Charles W. Rath 

Mr. & Mrs. F. Ian Ravenscroft 

Jack & Jane Real 

Mr. & Mrs. Fred L. Reed, Jr. 

Arlyne & Walter Rehak 

The Renna Family 

Ton! A. Reynolds 

Mr. & Mrs. John Ricciuti 

Mr. &. Mrs. H.R. Rice 

Mr. & Mrs. Jose A. Rionda 

Dr. & Mrs. George L. Riojeco 

Mrs. Helen Rocco 

Mr. & Mrs. Gary Roche 

Mr. & Mrs. Antonio Romano 

Mr. & Mrs. Alberto Romero 

Mrs. Lawrence Francis Rooney 

Mr. & Mrs. Antonio Rosal 

Mr. &. Mrs. Ronald Rose 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert M. Roselli 

Jack &. Alana Rosshirt 

Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Roy 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Russell 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert Sablone 

Mrs. Vita D. Salamone 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael F. Sammarco 

Mr. & Mrs. Alfonso P. Sanchez 

John & Aileen Sanders 

Mr. & Mrs. E. Jerome Schaub 

Mr. &. Mrs. Richard Schuessler 

Joseph & Judith Scully 

Lyman &. Elizabeth Sheafs 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul F. Sheehan 

Gerald & Carol Sheldon 

Dr. & Mrs. Harold J. Sherrington 

Don & Dolores Sherwood 

Deborah C. Shey 

Mr. &. Mrs. Thomas Silvia 

Mr. & Mrs. George T. Simmons 

Mr. & Mrs, Richard A. Simmons 

Mr. & Mrs. Gary Simonyan 

Henry & Cristina Singer 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward F. Smulsky 

Mr. & Mrs. Eugene M. Sneeringer 

A. Sollecito 

Mr. & Mrs. James A. Smida 

David & Kathleen Smith 



: 



Mr. & Mrs. Edward L, Smith, Jr, 

Nicholas & Elizabeth Smyth 

Mr. & Mrs. James M, Sokolich 

Mr, & Mrs, Albert Spada 

Mr. &. Mrs. Richard P. Spicuzza 

Dr. & Mrs. Richard B. Sriubas 

Charles & Helen Stamos 

Dr. & Mrs. William Stephan 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles R. Stuckey, Jr. 

Mr, & Mrs, Sullivan 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael'Suilivan 

Tony & Sharon Suppelsa 

Frederick John & Michele Tate, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Alfred Telia, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Theodore M. Tetreault 

Dr. & Mrs, Eugene W, Till 

Mr. &. Mrs. Ferdinand S. Tinio 

John Tirpak III 

Tom Mike 

Jerry Toomey, SOM '53 

John & Rose Mary Tosca 

Lecil & Betty Townsend 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard J. Troy 

Mr. &. Mrs. John F. Trueman 

Janet &. Paul Tuerff 

Dr. &. Mrs. Donald Tunks 

Andre &. Joyce Turenne 

Mr. &. Mrs. Leroy W. Twombly, III 

Dr. & Mrs. C.V. Valiente 

Mr. & Mrs. William H. Van Pelt, III 

Laurence E. Vienneau, D.M.D,, '50 

Joseph & Jane Vogtie 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Walsh 

Joseph &. Patricia Walsh 

Mr. & Mrs. Howard Wegman 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul Welch 

Mr. & Mrs. Volkmar K. Wentzel 

Mr. & Mrs. E. Donald White 

Mr. &. Mrs. James J. Wiley 

Cordell D. Williams, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Wayne E. Williams 

Judge & Mrs. Raymond D, Williamson 

Mr, & Mrs, H.F. Winderl 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Wise 

Mr. &, Mrs. Richard J. Wood 

Mr. &. Mrs. Dana F. Woodbury 

The Woodka Family 

Silas H.L Wu 

Mr. & Mrs. William G. Wyman 

Mr. &. Mrs. Frank P. Young 
Mr. & Mrs. Horace J. Zona, Jr. 



: 



462 / Patrons 



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Ads / 463 



Compliments of 

the Bellarmine Law 

Aoademy 




Congratulations and Best Wishes 

to tine class of 1987 

from 

Yearbook Associates 

Official School Photographers 

Millers Falls, MA 



464 / Ads 



CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES 

TO THE CLASS OF 1987 

FROM 



THE BOSTON COLLEGE BOOKSTORE 





Ads / 465 



Congratulations 

Jean^ Ted^ Karen^ Susie^ Lauren^ Denise^ John^ Matt^ Erica^ Maria^ 
John^ Sean^ Jeanie^ RockO; Dear John^ and the 

Class of 1987 

from 



Widits 



Keep 



Hlgfc_ 



in touch v/ith Boston College. 

has been the paper of record for Boston College 
since 1917 That^s a long tradition of student- 
run journalism. The Heights was there for you 
during your BC career^ and will be there for you 

in the future. Giving you the same great coverage of Eagle Sports. 

Giving you the scoop on the uncensored news from the Chestnut 

Hill. Giving you the feel of the arts in Boston. 

Keep up with the Eagles. Subscribe to The Heights today. 

For subscription or advertising rate information^ call or write: The Heights 
Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02167. (617) 552-3512 



466 / Ads 



Compliments 
of 

Hunter Publishing 

Company 

P.O. Box 5867 

Winston-Salem, North 

Carolina 27113 



GOOD LUCK 

CLASS OF 1987 

FROM THE STAFF OF 

SUB TURPI 



Ads / 467 



Sub Turri 
'^ Staff 
1987 



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468 / Staff 




photographers: jan linert, joe maloney 



staff/ 469 



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470 / Staff 



Joanne palumbo — activities editor 




sports editor 



judy vogtle 

senior section editor 



staff/ 471 




•?2 f~ 



472 / Staff 



A Note to ftie Staff, 




^%^%^ 



chris botelho 
editor-in-chief 



Wtien I occepted ttie position of Editor-in-Chief at the end of my junior year . 
I greatly underestimated botti its demands and its benefits. I did not wont ttijs 
bool< to be a one-man stvjw; believe me, I do not have ertougti creativilv to 
fill 488 yearbook pages. This book could not have been successful if it 
represented only my perspectives, my views, my skils. I never saw this only as 
"my book." 

My greatest challenge this year was to organize this staff and to rrxMrvate 
each individual to do his best work. I wanted this book to reflect o group ef- 
fort, providing a multi-faceted view of Boston College through the eyes and 
talents of the entire staff. I knew that this staff had a great ttvxjgh untapped 
potential to work, together and individually, to produce ttie highest quolity 
yearbook. And although I am very proud of my creative input and ttie overall 
design of the book, I hove found the most meaningful success in the tremen- 
dous success of this staff. 

The technical aspects of yearlDOOk production are not incredibly difficult to 
leam. However, they do require a time commitment to learn ttiem and even 
more time to become comfortable with these skills. On some staffs, only a very 
small group is comfortable and familiar with these skills. They lead ttie ottier 
editors by the hand, doing the necessary work for them. The ottier editors are, 
therefore, reduced to mere gophers. They are editors in name only. They have 
no voice, no opinion. 

This was not the case on the 1987 Sub Turn staff. 

Neither myself nor the other managing editors covered any bases for any of 
you. We worked with you, but we never worked for you. Every one of you was 
expected to be familiar with all aspects of yearbook production. You were 
given free reign in the overall designs of your individual sections. You ctxjse 
your themes. You researched your accompanying articles. You devised 
layout schemes. You made the important decisions. And you were respon- 
sible for the successful completion of your sections. 

The net result Is more then this yearbook that you hold in your hands. It is ttie 
honestly that we con all feel knowing that we were not a staff in name only. 
The 1987 Sub Turri is, in every way, the result of a combined effort of every per- 
son who devoted his or her time to its production. 

Yearbook production is very special work. We get no money, no applause, 
no standing ovations. Yet it is ultimately rewarding. When you look at a layout 
that you designed or a photo that you took I wont you to realize how unique 
that piece of work real ly is. No other person but you could have prepared that 
work in exactly the same way. You conceived that image in your mind and 
then translated that image into reality and presented it to the public in the 
form of this txxDk. That is quite a unique and personal gift to give of oneself. 

This book cost over $50,000 to produce; that is a great deal of money for a 
student to manage successfully. There is some form of copy on every page. 
Nearly every photo, excepting the portraits in the senior section, was shot and 
developed by our photography staff. 488 pages were conceptualized. 
designed, and laid-out by our production staff. 

I could name each one of you individually and praise you endlessly with 
the utmost sincerity. But I won't. You all know how much you hove worked, 
thought, laughed, and sacrificed while creating this book. Congratulations 
from me are not necessary. I want you to congratulate yourselves. I want you 
all to respect your own work and your own devotion as much as I do. I want 
you to realize that the success of this book reflects the success of this staff. 



Staff/ 473 




474 / Gariery 




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Gallery / 475 




476 /Gallery 




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Gallery / 477 




480 / Gallery 



















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Gallery / 481 




482 / Gallery 




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Gallery/ 483 




486 / Closing 




Geoff Why 



Closing / 487 




488 / Closing